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Old March 9th, 2013, 10:16 AM   #5721
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Amazing for a Big city. I grew in a small town near Lille where we had this lines along roads
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Old March 9th, 2013, 06:31 PM   #5722
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I just hope they don't make the cycle lane blue, it looks really awful.....a road surface should NEVER be blue!!!!!
It has to be distinctive from roads, bus lanes and pavements, so blue is the natural choice. People will get used to it over time.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 10:34 PM   #5723
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If it's properly segregated from the roads by a kerb as I've seen them do in Denmark (and as is proposed in the picture above for Embankment), then there's no need to have any colour differentiation.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 10:55 PM   #5724
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blue for boris
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Old March 10th, 2013, 04:56 PM   #5725
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London Skyline from Gipsy Hill by Arpad Lukacs Photography, on Flickr
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Old March 11th, 2013, 04:21 AM   #5726
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Imperial seeks partners to join new west London research and innovation campus



Imperial will today launch its vision for Imperial West, its new seven acre research and translation campus in White City, west London.

Imperial College London will today launch its vision for Imperial West, its new seven acre research and translation campus in White City, west London, at an event attended by David Willetts, Minister for Universities and Science, and Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London.

The centrepiece of the major new campus, the £150 million Research and Translation Hub, will provide state-of-the-art space for academics and business partners that can be adapted to keep pace with the changing demands of scientific discovery and innovation.

At the heart of the vision for Imperial West is a new approach to creating a university campus: potential partners from business, industry, the NHS and other global universities are being invited to co-locate on the campus and collaborate directly with the College's world-leading experts in science, technology, engineering, medicine and business.

Imperial bought the land for the new campus from the BBC in 2009. The first new building, which provides accommodation for over 600 postgraduates and early career researchers, has been occupied since September 2012. Terms of the planning permission for the rest of the site were agreed with the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in December 2012.

Today's launch follows the award from HEFCE in November 2012 of £35 million towards the development of the £150 million Research and Translation Hub via the UK Research Partnership and Investment Fund.

Design work on the Hub, which is also funded by investor Voreda and from the College's own resources, is underway. The College plans to complete the construction in 2015.

When open, the 42,000 square metre Hub will provide facilities for 1,000 scientists and engineers and space that could accommodate 50 or more spin out companies from inception through to maturity, supporting the needs of London's enterprise community. Imperial has produced more spin-out businesses than any other UK university, 140 over the last 10 years, but has been able to accommodate only 10-15 at any one time in its South Kensington Campus Incubator.

At tonight's launch event, attended by 700 guests including representatives from business, government and research funders, Sir Keith O'Nions, President & Rector of Imperial, will say:

"Applying what we discover to the benefit of society and the economy has been in our DNA since we were founded in South Kensington in 1907. In the 21st Century Imperial has the ambition to play an even bigger role in translating ideas for public good and in helping to create industrial and economic competitiveness."

"To make a difference, to solve big problems, we need to bring brilliant people from different fields together and give them time and space. Thanks to Imperial West we have the space, and through launching this vision, we hope to convince potential partners in business, charities, governments, academia and healthcare of the benefits of forming long-term relationships with us at Imperial West."

Imperial West and the College's adjacent campus at Hammersmith Hospital (500 metres away) will become two poles of a major new research quarter for London, reinforcing the capital's position as a catalyst for scientific development and economic growth.

The new campus also represents investment in the White City regeneration area, providing homes, publicly accessible green space, pedestrian subways and leisure and retail facilities. On completion, the campus will generate an estimated 3,200 permanent jobs.

Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, says: "London is home to some of the world's leading universities and sharpest business minds. This fantastic venture will bring the best of both these worlds together turning brilliant ideas into jobs and economic growth and further bolster our reputation as the must-come destination for research and development."

David Willetts, Minister for Universities and Science, says: "Imperial is one of our country's great universities and the new Imperial West campus is a really exciting development. It will focus on translational work - on applying the excellent research that Imperial does to bring benefit to the wider world. The government strongly supports the vision and plans for the new campus and we look forward to seeing it grow and prosper in the future."
http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandev...-3-2013-10-8-9
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Old March 11th, 2013, 05:45 AM   #5727
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Glass pavilion in the sky will transform the Cinderella Southbank



The Southbank Centre is to undergo a radical £120 million transformation that includes a new glass pavilion in the sky, it was announced today.
This looks incredibly similar (almost the exact same) to what was planned for the Museum of Modern Art in Sydney. An enormous glass box floating above the main building. Instead they went with the worst design possible (basically a McMansion attached to a beautiful art deco power house on Circular Quay)
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Old March 11th, 2013, 01:06 PM   #5728
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Old March 11th, 2013, 08:22 PM   #5729
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Almacantar revives flat plans for Centre Point





The owner of London's infamous concrete tower, Centre Point, will relaunch £350m plans to transform the 1960s-built block into luxury flats within weeks.

Developer Almacantar and partner Frogmore want to revamp the area with a new piazza at Centre Point's base next to the junction of New Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road. This has been a well-known haunt of drug addicts, yet the developers' original plans were thrown out by Camden council last September.

The scheme is one of the highest-profile office-to-residential conversion projects in the country, likely to create more than 3,000 jobs during its construction – and involving the replacement of 9,000 window panes with double glazing

Almacantar says the building is too expensive to maintain as a commercial office. Converted into flats, the building will be far more lucrative.

Based on prices at the nearby Fitzroy Place scheme, industry sources estimate the apartments could fetch at least £1m each.

Almacantar is understood to be marketing the flats through property agent Savills.

Buying the tower was Almacantar's first big deal nearly two years ago when chief executive Mike Hussey purchased the Grade-II listed building from administrators of a subsidiary of property group Targetfollow for £120m.

The company wanted to tackle an accident blackspot by closing St Giles High Street under the bridge between the tower and Centre Point House, where pedestrians are forced into the bus lane by poorly designed paving. Camden – which was also concerned about the lack of affordable housing in the original proposal – wants further study into the impact of the road closure on local traffic.

The developer is also looking to assuage concerns over the lack of affordable housing through building flats on the site of the former Intrepid Fox rockers pub, bought by Almacantar last September.

A separate planning application for the piazza will be submitted later, although the developer is at present resisting pressure from the council to accommodate a viewing gallery in its plans.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/bu...t-8528473.html
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Old March 11th, 2013, 11:39 PM   #5730
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London's Crossrail: welcome to the underworld



Far beneath London’s streets, two vast machines called Phyllis and Ada are slowly digging their way through thousands of tonnes of clay (carefully avoiding secret government tunnels) to build Crossrail. Richard Godwin has a preview of the mammoth subterranean engineering project that will transform the way we travel.

To pay a visit to Phyllis, you have to enter the tunnels through the Westbourne Park site, a slim yard between the Westway and the Paddington mainline, where temporary offices are stacked like building blocks and cranes hoik huge sections of concrete tunnel lining from goods’ sidings. The two entrances are only accessible by the temporary service railway that the engineers are building as they go along. Ventilation ducts and conveyor belts protrude from each hole like drip tubes from a hospital patient. ‘The earth is a living, breathing thing,’ points out assistant project manager Greg Reichmann, as we descend in our ‘man-rider’, a cage on wheels with a few seats.

Inside, the smell is damp and clean, the aroma of London clay, combined with those reassuring industrial smells of oil, diesel and fresh sweat. It’s the noise that gets you — the worst thing I’ve ever heard. At the bottom is a scraping low note like a hellish double bass; in the middle periodically shrieking horns; at the top a cranky, scraping rattle that hits the sensitive bits in your teeth. When we reach what they call a California Crossing — the track splits in two so that two locomotives can pass one another — it all erupts. ‘It’s like screaming!’ winces one young engineer, adjusting his ear plugs. I get the sense you don’t get used to it.

At every stage, Crossrail has been a logistical nightmare. The idea of a trans-London railway was first floated in the 1960s, but it took decades of lobbying and politicking to convince the Treasury that there would be economic value in it. Eventually, it was the gumption of the former Labour Transport Secretary Lord Adonis, Boris Johnson and Ken Livingstone that saw it through, with work finally beginning on the £14.8 billion project in 2009.

Only when you take in any of the 40 sites at close quarters do you get an idea of the scale of the operation. Crossrail is essentially like a new London Underground line, only twice as big. It will span 118km of track, 21km of which will be housed in brand-new tunnels like the one I am exploring. The line starts in Maidenhead in Berkshire, taking in Slough, Heathrow airport, Paddington, the West End and the City before branching at Whitechapel, where the northern section will run to Shenfield in Essex, via Stratford and Romford, and the southern section to Abbey Wood via Docklands. There will be 37 stations, eight of which are being built from scratch. Come 2018, we will be able to zip from Heathrow to Tottenham Court Road in half an hour, Paddington to Canary Wharf in a quarter of an hour. Homes along the route, in areas such as Woolwich, Southall and Ealing Broadway, are expected to rise in price by around 25 per cent.

We will get an idea of what the trains will look like in 2014, when the tendering process enters its next phase. We already know that they will be powered by overhead cables (as opposed to the ‘third rail’ on the Tube) and be up to 250m in length (a typical Tube train is 100m). With up to 24 trains per hour and room for 1,500 people on each train, 200 million people will be able to use the service each year, increasing London’s transport capacity by ten per cent.

If the statistics don’t quite evoke the scale, Phyllis certainly does. When I visit, her rear end is somewhere underneath Speaker’s Corner while her front bit is edging slowly towards the newly built Bond Street station. (The tunnels are built on a slight ascent towards the stations and descend coming out of the stations, to help with acceleration and deceleration.) She is less of a machine than a mobile mothership, complete with kitchens, workshops and a rescue pod sufficient to keep 20 workers alive for 24 hours.

The business end of the operation is the 7m circular shield, which exerts 58,000 kilo-newtons per metre of pressure as it drills — enough force to lift 2,900 London taxis. Reichmann, a 32-year-old Australian who began his career in coal mining, says that, although mechanical drills are now used instead of pickaxes, it is more or less the same system that Isambard Kingdom Brunel used to dig the Thames Tunnel in 1825 — pushing a shield against the excavated section as they build behind it. ‘Mining engineers tend to regard Brunel as a bit of a hero,’ he says. ‘This may be a German machine, and the workers from all over, but the British pretty much wrote the book on this stuff.’

Currently in the cockpit is a pilot named Ludwig, who has set all the controls to German. I notice that the machine is 4mm off course. ‘That’s easy to correct,’ I am assured. It may weigh 1,000 tonnes, but the controls — and the safety procedures that go along with them — are so precise as to be almost dainty. Everything is planned with laser-precision. At this depth, there is not much other stuff to avoid (water and electricity pipes and cables are buried much closer to the surface), but there are other Tube lines and there is always the possibility of secret government tunnels. ‘They don’t tell us exactly where they are,’ says Reichmann. ‘They might just tell us to plan the tunnel a couple of metres left or right.’

Most of Central London is built on clay, which is impermeable, malleable and almost self-supporting, making it an ideal substance for tunnelling. Many Londoners assume that there is a lack of Underground lines South of the Thames due to some sort of North London conspiracy, but actually, the further South you go, the sandier the ground becomes, meaning it makes more sense to build overground lines. When the time comes to excavate the Woolwich section, two specialist slurry tunnelling machines, Sophia and Mary, will be used.

Phyllis also builds as she digs. As the huge factory inches forward — average speed 100m a week — it uses its massive hydraulic arms to push another section of concrete tunnel casings into place. Each 1.6m section is made up of eight concrete segments (the factory at Old Oak Common will have to make around 250,000 of them), each one lifted into place by a vast suction machine controlled by a man with a joystick (he calls it his ‘PlayStation’). It’s like using the nozzle of a vacuum cleaner to extract a slipper from under the sofa, only this vacuum can lift 3.5 tonnes.

At the back are the mechanisms for getting rid of the excavated clay — conveyer belts pass out 7,500 tonnes of it each week. Since the machine will have moved 100m forward in that time, the belt must keep getting longer and so a conveyor belt-lengthening station is built in. Ultimately, 4.5 million tonnes of clay will be taken out to Wallasea Island in Essex, where it will become the largest wetland reserve of its kind in Europe.

All of this requires constant manpower. Twenty people work on Phyllis 24 hours a day, in three eight-hour shifts. Then there are the armies of support staff. The driver of our service locomotive, Eamon McDonald, 31, from Palmers Green, is one of 400 apprentices being trained through the new Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy (TUCA) in Ilford, having been directed there through the Jobcentre. ‘I trained as a carpenter but ended up doing a lot of shuttering, which was rubbish, not much skill to it,’ he says. ‘I want to do tunnels now, it’s such interesting work.’ For the moment he is driving Locomotive 7 (and looks mildly disgusted when I ask if he’s given it a name: ‘Never name a train,’ he says). Ultimately, he hopes to become a full tunnelling engineer. It takes around ten years to gain the expertise to pilot a machine like Phyllis.

By then, Crossrail 2 could be under way. The sequel, recently proposed by the lobbying group London First, will run from Wimbledon to Cheshunt via Chelsea and Hackney, thus bringing East London hipsters into uncomfortable reach of West London Sloanes. There are also huge extensions to Victoria station and London Bridge, not to mention the High Speed 2 rail line. And there is demand for tunnelling engineers in Qatar where the preparations for the 2022 World Cup are under way. ‘There’s always work somewhere,’ says McDonald.

I turn to Wyn Bowkett, 48, who trained as a coal miner in Wales, transferring his skills into tunnelling around the time of the 1985 miners’ strikes. His first project was the London Ring Main, the updating of our sanitation system completed in the 1990s. Like many engineers on the Crossrail project, he also helped to build the Channel Tunnel. ‘It’s a shame people never get to see this,’ he says, patting Phyllis. ‘Most people go round on the Tube and just see the shiny stations. They have no idea. Just like they imagine that bridges appear overnight. They never think how they got there.’

http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/...d-8524774.html
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Old March 11th, 2013, 11:48 PM   #5731
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Could this be London's moment - when the tech scene is really about to explode?

Enough of the Silicon Valley comparisons — Matt Cowan of WIRED says the technology cluster on Old Street roundabout is a new world of talent, ambition and global success.

According to the Boston Consulting Group’s latest report, The Connected World, the internet economy’s contribution to UK GDP is, at 8.3 per cent, higher than that of any other G20 nation. The report forecasts that this share will surge to 12.4 per cent by 2016.

By then, almost a quarter of sales in the UK are expected to take place online — more than double the percentage of our projected closest competitor, Germany.

“It’s less than 25 years old but the web is already responsible for more than eight per cent of UK GDP,” said Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt in a speech at London’s Science Museum.

As the internet evolves, many in business and government see London playing a central role in what comes next.

“It is all the great cities of the US in one,” says Joanna Shields, who left the top European job at Facebook to oversee our Government’s Tech City Investment Organisation four months ago. Like Washington DC, she explains, London is the seat of national government. Like New York, it has financial services and thriving art, fashion and media scenes. Like LA, it has creative industries. Like Chicago and New York, it has an advertising world. And technology is playing an increasingly meaningful role in all of these sectors.

Noting that more than a third of London’s population was born outside the UK, Shields says the city is “the most global city in the world. Everything you need is there.”

Big US technology companies such as Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Cisco and Intel have begun to take notice. Facebook recently opened its first engineering office outside the US in Covent Garden. “It’s a huge testament to the talent that’s available here,” says the company’s developer-relations manager, Simon Cross. Indeed, outside California, London has the greatest concentration of software developers working on the social networking giant’s platform.

“The thing that seems to have changed is that London has moved from being a community of extremely technically able people to being a community of extremely technically able people building companies,” says Cross. “The entrepreneurial streak has definitely accelerated.”

Google, too, is betting big on the capital’s start-up potential. In March last year it opened Campus, a seven-storey centre in east London that provides workspaces, free wi-fi and mentorship opportunities to burgeoning small businesses. The head of Google Campus, Eze Vidra, says it is intended to provide “rocket fuel” for a thriving community that is showing considerable promise. “Campus London is the first of its kind anywhere in the world,” he says. “There couldn’t be a more fitting place to break new ground.” Just 10 months later, the company announced plans for a £1 billion UK headquarters in King’s Cross.

In December last year, David Cameron committed £50 million to regenerate the Old Street roundabout area into Europe’s largest indoor “civic space”, equipped with state-of-the-art 3D-printing technology. Microsoft has announced that it will establish a technology centre in east London. Amazon has opened a development centre. Cisco and University College London (UCL) are partnering with publisher DC Thomson to establish an innovation hothouse and Intel is working with UCL and Imperial College to create a new research centre.

“London is inexhaustible,” says Santiago Matheus, who in 2011 set up Method Design Lab, a programme run in conjunction with London’s Central Saint Martins School of Arts and Design. “Even when things are really choppy London keeps flying, because you have the government, the media, the creatives, the finance ... At any one time, even if two or three of those are struggling, the others keep the engine going. That’s what makes London the capital of the Western world.”

Rohan Silva, senior policy adviser to the Prime Minister, agrees. “A lot of the US companies we talk to say part of the reason they want to be in London is that the workforce here is not just international, but more outward- looking. So you can hire people in London and then a year later say, ‘Hey, we want to open an office in Beijing’. London people are very likely to be up for moving to Beijing and setting up an office there.”

The Government has made a series of moves to promote London’s competitiveness in the technology sector. Perhaps most importantly, it has established an entrepreneur’s visa (stealing a march on the US, where the issue has long been debated) and also created tax breaks for early-stage investors. It is also working with investors and the London Stock Exchange to oversee a revamp of the exchange’s listing requirements in order to encourage more homegrown companies to go public in London. “I think a tech scene is probably a bit like a fine cheese — there’s a moment when it all comes together,” says Silva. “I think it’s really about to explode.”

Sitting in the Mayfair offices of Index Ventures, where he’s a partner, Saul Klein, an entrepreneur turned investor, is feeling bullish. “London’s moment has arrived,” he says. “Absolutely. And potentially, London’s role in the global economy for the next period. We haven’t had this role in 100 years or more. We’re not living in a US internet any more but we’re still living in an internet where English is the most important language. The fact that English is so fundamental but we are not American is crucial. The BRIC economies [Brazil, Russia, India and China] and those in Europe and Africa have a better, less suspicious trading and cultural relationship with the UK than they do with the US.”

For Klein this position represents a 180-degree shift from his position in the mid-1990s. After helping to launch Britain’s first online newspaper, Telegraph.co.uk, in 1994, Klein was so discouraged by the slow adoption of the internet (the largest service provider then had a paltry 5,000 users) that he moved to Boston.

He returned to London in 2002 to start the company that would become LOVEFiLM and found it to be “a different world”. Later, he joined Skype which, though headquartered in Luxembourg with a Swede and a Dane as co-founders, owes a good deal of its success to London, where the commercial team was based. Skype went on to become one of Europe’s biggest tech success stories when Microsoft bought it for £5.4 billion in May 2011. “When I compare what the UK looked like 18 years ago to what it looks like today, it’s remarkable,” says Klein.

He is convinced there’s a broad shift happening in technology that favours businesses emerging from urban centres rather than suburban complexes. “I would describe the first phase as the discretionary internet — an internet that concentrated on things like shopping, news and entertainment. All of which are fun and we love them — but if they didn’t exist, we would still live. The phase we are moving into will be about industries we can’t live without, like education, health, transport and food.”

In the world Klein describes, the stakes get ever higher. The global advertising market is worth $100 billion, education is worth more than $3.9 trillion, and we spend at least $1 trillion on telephony. “We should build companies that reimagine healthcare or energy, because these businesses are orders of magnitude larger,” he says.

Still, the view that London’s tech scene has reached a definitive moment will be controversial, because the city has yet to produce the billion-pound deals that grab headlines. Klein urges patience. “Be Chinese, stop being American,” he says. “We’ve got to get ourselves out of the New York/Silicon Valley mindset of everything moving at the speed of light. Great things don’t happen overnight.”

BOOMING LONDON

200 Tech companies in east London three years ago.

1,300 Tech companies in east London in January 2013.

92,000m2 Area acquired by technology, media and communications start-ups in London in the first nine months of last year.

39 Percentage increase last year of City office space rented to tech and media start-ups.

61,300 New businesses launched in London in 2011, up from 51,000 in 2009

http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/...e-8528837.html
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Old March 12th, 2013, 12:58 AM   #5732
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AMAZING! Go London!

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"That’s what makes London the capital of the Western world.”
Even the professionals think so
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Old March 12th, 2013, 11:31 AM   #5733
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Old March 12th, 2013, 03:05 PM   #5734
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“It is all the great cities of the US in one,” says Joanna Shields, who left the top European job at Facebook to oversee our Government’s Tech City Investment Organisation four months ago. Like Washington DC, she explains, London is the seat of national government. Like New York, it has financial services and thriving art, fashion and media scenes. Like LA, it has creative industries. Like Chicago and New York, it has an advertising world. And technology is playing an increasingly meaningful role in all of these sectors.
____
The Government has made a series of moves to promote London’s competitiveness in the technology sector. Perhaps most importantly, it has established an entrepreneur’s visa (stealing a march on the US, where the issue has long been debated) and also created tax breaks for early-stage investors. It is also working with investors and the London Stock Exchange to oversee a revamp of the exchange’s listing requirements in order to encourage more homegrown companies to go public in London. “I think a tech scene is probably a bit like a fine cheese — there’s a moment when it all comes together,” says Silva. “I think it’s really about to explode.”
Wait, I think they meant to say, New York, right? No...?




Does this mean the argument is settled?
Just don't make us say it, we're a proud bunch after all.
Though, I fear you'll still have the Parisians "all up in your grill," so...

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The fact that English is so fundamental but we are not American is crucial. The BRIC economies [Brazil, Russia, India and China] and those in Europe and Africa have a better, less suspicious trading and cultural relationship with the UK than they do with the US.”
The only sentence that has little purchase with me. China, Russia, Brazil, Europe, and maybe Africa...okay....but India?
Then again, maybe the times have changed.
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Old March 12th, 2013, 05:24 PM   #5735
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... well, London is where 'the world does business'. 2,000 years in the making and coming of age.

‘Boris Island 2’ plan for floating Docks village



Britain's largest floating village with homes, hotels and restaurants is to be created at the Royal Victoria Dock in east London.

The 15-acre development will be modelled on successful schemes at Ijbury near Amsterdam and Hafen City in Hamburg and others in Scandinavia. Sitting directly under the new Thames cable car, the capital’s first liquid postcode is part of Boris Johnson’s drive to transform the Royal Docks.

When complete it will be one-and-a-half times the size of Green Park and have a Crossrail station and transport links to Canary Wharf.

The Mayor today launched an international competition at MIPIM, a major property conference in Cannes, to find developers to design and deliver the scheme.

He said: “This site is unique. It has the potential to become one of the most sought after addresses in the capital while breathing new life back into London’s waterways. But it’s not alone.

“Right across London there are incredible investment opportunities that I’m determined to bring to market, creating more homes and jobs for Londoners. My message to the developers gathering at MIPIM is that London is the best place to invest.”

Mr Johnson said the redevelopment of the Royal Docks area was one of his key priorities. He has already opened the Emirates cable car and the Siemens Crystal Centre and there are future developments at Silvertown Quays and Royal Albert Docks. The Mayor was today meeting investors and property developers at the Cannes conference. City Hall is one of the largest owners of public land in London having inherited more than 600 hectares last year under the Localism Act.

The floating village scheme has cross-party support. Labour Newham’s mayor Sir Robin Wales said: “London is moving eastwards and the Royal Docks offer an investment opportunity in scale unmatched anywhere in Europe. This exciting development is a pivotal part of their reanimation.

“As today’s announcement shows, they have the capacity to attract modern sustainable businesses and deliver 21st century growth for the capital. It is essential that the transformation of the area translates into long-term prosperity, growth and jobs.”

The architect behind the 41-floor Gherkin is planning the Square Mile’s tallest tower. Ken Shuttleworth, a former partner of Lord Foster with whom he designed the Gherkin, wants to create a building 100 metres higher on the site of the stalled Pinnacle project. He is one of several architects and developers pitching proposals for a building in its place.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/londo...e-8531083.html
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Old March 12th, 2013, 05:43 PM   #5736
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“This site is unique. It has the potential to become one of the most sought after addresses in the capital while breathing new life back into London’s waterways."

What! directly under the approach to City airport?
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Old March 12th, 2013, 06:12 PM   #5737
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Excellent for bird watching!
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Old March 12th, 2013, 10:09 PM   #5738
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I'd love to see some kind of elevated cycle lanes crossing the city
In the same way that New York built those paths on disused railways.
I'm pretty sure more people would cycle if they did not have cars zooming past them about a foot away.
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Old March 12th, 2013, 11:03 PM   #5739
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 486 View Post
... well, London is where 'the world does business'. 2,000 years in the making and coming of age.

Have a sense of humor... just having a bit of fun.
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Old March 12th, 2013, 11:53 PM   #5740
LondonFox
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gehenaus View Post
I'd love to see some kind of elevated cycle lanes crossing the city
In the same way that New York built those paths on disused railways.
I'm pretty sure more people would cycle if they did not have cars zooming past them about a foot away.


Yes, I would like this also.
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