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Old November 5th, 2013, 07:15 PM   #8441
SE9
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Google $1bn London Headquarters | King's Cross N1C

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=505188


Google have today announced that they are scrapping current plans for their new $1 billion office in London, approved in September. Google stated that the current plans are not ambitious enough, and have instructed their project team to create a superior proposal in scope and design. The redesign will delay the project's completion by a year:

- Property Week: Google goes back to the drawing board on King's Cross

- The Telegraph: Google delays UK HQ move

- Building Design: Google sends AHMM back to the drawing board

- The Next Web: Google wants a new design for its ultra-ambitious London HQ, and could delay it until 2017

- Engaget: Google scraps London HQ design in favor of something 'even better'
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Old November 5th, 2013, 07:18 PM   #8442
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Italiano95 View Post
What is planned to be built on the empty spot beside one commercial street and aldgate tower and between them and Altitude in Aldgate?

edit: saw that the the planned building was called aldgate place, any renders?
Here's the Aldgate Place thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1646861
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Old November 5th, 2013, 07:19 PM   #8443
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Birmingham View Post
Bricks - I think I speak for everyone. Go away already!!
First you hijack the thread by turning it into an rule Britannia kinda thing, then you get angry when people actually challenge you. Good job! If you don't want an argument don't start one ffs!

Quote:
Originally Posted by virtuesoft
BTW. Roman architecture is Roman. Well done on that. But it was still used in the UK


You mean in the province Britannia.


No please cut the crap and go back on topic.
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Old November 5th, 2013, 07:30 PM   #8444
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bricks View Post
Maybe you should be bothered to some research? You are making an absurd statement - you provide the facts! Take a look at your neighbor, France, and how architecture has changed there over the last 2000 years. The list will be equally impressive. But why don't you tell the Chinese, who were building cities when people in Britain (and most of Europe) were living like beasts, that the history of British architecture is the most impressive in the world.
Chinese cities are actually very lacking in historical architecture compared to Britain's, and ancient Chinese buildings are almost non-existant. That's partly because the Chinese built in non-durable wood, and also because the Chinese, in contrast to Europeans, never preserved old buildings, such that Chinese cities never became repositories of centuries and centuries of architecture piled up layer upon layer. That's why there is no Chinese equivalent of London, Paris, or Rome.

Middle Eastern cities are the world's oldest, and rival European cites for a continuous architectural record still extant today. (Though in most cases they have "gaps", just like cities in Europe.)

I happen to think the London's architectural variety is almost unrivalled. Maybe Paris and Istanbul come closest, but they keep their old and new buildings much further apart than London. Rome has a hugely impressive collection from ancient times until the C18th, but Rome's architectural offering from C19th, C20th, and C21st centures is very thin.

Can you think of any urban district with more architectural variety than the central London? I can't...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bricks View Post
Oh and btw, Roman architecture is Roman, not British. Don't confuse what has been built by a culture that could be described as "British" with what was built by other cultures in what today is Britain.
It's a moot point given that Britain has few intact Roman buildings, but where they do exist, they're part of our history and architectural heritage, just as British-built buildings in far-flung parts of the British Empire are part of those countries' architectural heritage as well as ours.
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Old November 5th, 2013, 10:37 PM   #8445
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Is that Alucobond cladding??
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Old November 5th, 2013, 10:42 PM   #8446
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bricks View Post
First you hijack the thread by turning it into an rule Britannia kinda thing, then you get angry when people actually challenge you. Good job! If you don't want an argument don't start one ffs!
I think Bricks you should go back to the very beginning. Firstly, I didn't hijack this thread. I'm here all the time (more so than you) and i'm sure others will vouch for that. Secondly, how it all started was a simple statement. I said "I think Aldgate will have a fantastic streetscape in 5-10 years" ... Not exactly banging the "Rule Britannia" drum was it?? You're either really ignorant or very dumb. And thirdly, how contradictive do you want to be?? I defended MY OPINION. Where as you felt the need to slate somebodies opinion believing nobody else can have a ******* say!! I don't want an argument because It's pathetic. You never stop. You're acting like a spoilt brat!!
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Old November 5th, 2013, 11:00 PM   #8447
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Quote:
Originally Posted by virtuesoft View Post
China isn't even close. They remained loyal to classical Chinese architecture for centuries. The same with Japan.
Although I disagree with Mr Bricks's contentious style, I think he's absolutely right that you are being extremely narrow-minded.

Taking China as an example, I don't know how you can say such a massive and ancient country "remained loyal" to one type of architecture. Let me just show you a tiny sample of the different styles of architecture in China:




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Old November 5th, 2013, 11:27 PM   #8448
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Originally Posted by Langur View Post
Chinese cities are actually very lacking in historical architecture compared to Britain's, and ancient Chinese buildings are almost non-existant. That's partly because the Chinese built in non-durable wood, and also because the Chinese, in contrast to Europeans, never preserved old buildings, such that Chinese cities never became repositories of centuries and centuries of architecture piled up layer upon layer. That's why there is no Chinese equivalent of London, Paris, or Rome.
What a load of absolute bullshit which you've clearly just made up on the spot to make yourself sound knowledgeable. Shame on you.

The Chinese, pre 1911 at least, have greatly revered everything old, preserving ancient buildings and objects with a diligence unseen anywhere in the West.

In fact, the Chinese Emperor and the entire ruling class lived for 500 years in the exact same complex of buildings, architecturally unchanged, from c. 1400-1911.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 01:36 AM   #8449
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Didn't realise this was a Chinese architecture thread now...
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Old November 6th, 2013, 02:28 AM   #8450
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gehenaus View Post
Didn't realise this was a Chinese architecture thread now...
No, but I think this thread needs it so that in the future it can stay focused. Examples from chinese architecture proves a specific statement from a user in this thread completely wrong and made up, as usually happens when a case for national exceptionalism is made.

London's a global city and loved by many myself included. However, exaggerated nationalism/city patriotism coupled with ignorance is really putting people off. I really don't think or hope that some of the views of a minority of the users of this thread is representative.

It seems as there's the notion of british exceptionalism, just as its american cousin and both are equally disgusting to me as well as other kinds of nationalistic excess which I guess most cultures have been through from time to time.

You're f***ing London. You don't need to behave as a Eurovision host from Kabarakhstan. Focus on the projects and let the dick measuring with Paris (which is quite one-sided on ssc I'm afraid) and New York (which is also quite one-sided I'm afraid) stay in the local pub, or at least in the local forums...Just a suggestion. There's a reason this debate is brought up again and again.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 03:37 AM   #8451
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheNorthRoad View Post
No, but I think this thread needs it so that in the future it can stay focused. Examples from chinese architecture proves a specific statement from a user in this thread completely wrong and made up, as usually happens when a case for national exceptionalism is made.

London's a global city and loved by many myself included. However, exaggerated nationalism/city patriotism coupled with ignorance is really putting people off. I really don't think or hope that some of the views of a minority of the users of this thread is representative.

It seems as there's the notion of british exceptionalism, just as its american cousin and both are equally disgusting to me as well as other kinds of nationalistic excess which I guess most cultures have been through from time to time.

You're f***ing London. You don't need to behave as a Eurovision host from Kabarakhstan. Focus on the projects and let the dick measuring with Paris (which is quite one-sided on ssc I'm afraid) and New York (which is also quite one-sided I'm afraid) stay in the local pub, or at least in the local forums...Just a suggestion. There's a reason this debate is brought up again and again.
Fair post....

If only you hadn't made the predictable mistake of attributing a different kind of exceptionalism to the Brits - namely that they are the only ones who engage in silly dick measuring exercises. It's a characteristic that afflicts every nationality and every forum on SSC.

Enough of this tedious finger pointing by all concerned and please let's get back to the real substance of this thread.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 06:48 AM   #8452
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International cities have many styles of architecture representing many different cultures, times in history, and mindsets of their builders. Any city that has existed longer than one architectural style will have a vast mix of styles.

END OF DISCUSSION on that topic!
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Old November 6th, 2013, 07:23 AM   #8453
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steppenwolf View Post
You certainly do not speak for everyone!

Bricks can be excellent - They can age well and soften as opposed to getting streaked and dirty like cladding. They last longer and they can be used to tie in a development with it's local and London context. Good bricks are not a developer's first choice because they're very good quality and therefore expensive, which is why developers prefer very cheap render, panels and such which almost always age badly and end up looking rubbish.

Architects are readopting brick as London’s building block
Financial Times



Cities were once built from the earth from which they were extruded: Rome from its creamy travertine; Bath from its warm limestone; Paris from its cooler, bluer limestone; Glasgow its ginger sandstone; Jerusalem from Jerusalem stone. Others were built of the mud excavated from beneath the site or from timber from the woods which engulfed them. London, meanwhile, is built on soft clay and owes everything to those compacted, fired blocks of its substrata.

The fabric of London is brick. The city’s key landmarks may be dressed in stone but the buildings which form the backgrounds to the everyday domestic lives of London’s citizens are of solid brick. From St James’s Palace to elegant Queen Anne terraces, from genteel Georgian garden squares to stolid Victorian streets, the fabric of the city’s domesticity is invested in bricks and mortar – a term which has become synonymous with property.

Brick, however, was not generally seen as the material of modernity, a movement more readily associated with the slippery transparency of glass and steel. Brick evoked dark interiors, soot-stained stations and oppressive mills. Construction techniques changed, as steel frames, cavity and curtain walls obviated the need for brick. When it was used it was often as a cladding material, which raised issues about Ruskinian honesty – such as, should a material which appears structural be used as a decorative skin? Such modernist dogma appears to have subsided.

Brick survived an onslaught of glass and steel and thrived in a line of extraordinary buildings from the vast Battersea Power Station (reputedly made of 66m bricks) to the British Library in St Pancras.

London’s most architecturally inventive buildings are also built from brick, from William Morris’s Red House in Bexleyheath to JF Bentley’s awesome, neo-Byzantine Westminster Cathedral. A whole language of 20th-century brick forms emerged embracing Charles Holden’s inventively moderne Underground stations, the London County Council’s Dutch- and deco-influenced social housing, garden suburb arts and crafts and the endless rows of bypass semis.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 07:26 AM   #8454
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Crown Estate’s ($1.6bn) Revamping Project of Regent Street in London Gets Underway
November 4, 2013



The Crown Estate’s £1 billion ($1.6 billion) regeneration of Regent Street has reached a new milestone as on site work starts at Quadrant 2 South.

The project follows in the footsteps of previous redevelopments that have seen the Regent Street Quadrant in London transformed into a destination for fashion, lifestyle and business. Regent Street is owned by The Crown Estate in partnership with Norges Bank Investment Management.

Previously completed projects to date include the landmark Quadrant 3 scheme, a £400 million ($643 million) mixed-use redevelopment covering 270,000 square feet of space. The successful project includes Al Gore’s Generation Investment Management and Telefonica Digital amongst its office tenants.

The works at Quadrant 2 South will see the Grade II listed properties redeveloped to provide new, modern office space and this way building further up Regent Street’s reputation as a destination for global businesses. The project, a wholesale retrofit of Quadrant House and 7-9 Air Street, is expected to be completed by early 2015.

http://www.cpexecutive.com/regions/i...gets-underway/
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Old November 6th, 2013, 07:31 AM   #8455
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Hong Kong investment group spends £666 million ($1.1 billion) on Greenwich development
5 November 2013



Hong Kong investor Knight Dragon has taken full ownership of a development in Greenwich after buying out the remaining 40% stake held by its British partner Quintain Estates.

Knight Dragon, an investment vehicle owned by Henry Cheng Kar-Shun, the chairman of New World Development Co, bought a 60% share in the development last year for £480m. The firm reportedly paid £186m for the remaining 40%. The development is one of several investments made by Asian investors in central London in recent years.

Last week Oxley Holdings, a Singapore based developer, bought another one of London’s largest development sites, the Greenwich scheme, which is near the O2 concert venue. It will contain more than 10,000 homes.

http://www.londonlovesbusiness.com/p...h/6717.article
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Old November 6th, 2013, 09:14 AM   #8456
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SE9 View Post
Google $1bn London Headquarters | King's Cross N1C

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=505188


Google have today announced that they are scrapping current plans for their new $1 billion office in London, approved in September. Google stated that the current plans are not ambitious enough, and have instructed their project team to create a superior proposal in scope and design. The redesign will delay the project's completion by a year:

- Property Week: Google goes back to the drawing board on King's Cross

- The Telegraph: Google delays UK HQ move

- Building Design: Google sends AHMM back to the drawing board

- The Next Web: Google wants a new design for its ultra-ambitious London HQ, and could delay it until 2017

- Engaget: Google scraps London HQ design in favor of something 'even better'
Any picture of the new Google HQ?
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Old November 6th, 2013, 09:15 AM   #8457
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Singapore developer buys £200m ($320m) Royal Wharf scheme
6 November 2013



Site with planning consent for Glenn Howells and Feilden Clegg Bradley scheme described as ‘blank canvas’

The Royal Wharf development site has been bought by a Singapore developer which has announced plans for “an entirely new district for London”.

The deal was welcomed by London mayor Boris Johnson who heralded it as evidence of appetite among Far Eastern developers to invest in the capital.

http://www.bdonline.co.uk/news/singa...063027.article
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Old November 6th, 2013, 10:30 AM   #8458
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post
Although I disagree with Mr Bricks's contentious style, I think he's absolutely right that you are being extremely narrow-minded.

Taking China as an example, I don't know how you can say such a massive and ancient country "remained loyal" to one type of architecture. Let me just show you a tiny sample of the different styles of architecture in China:
I didn't say that China remained loyal to one architectural style over its entire history. I said that it remained loyal to one architectural style for centuries. This is because their dynasties typically lasted far longer than UK kings or queens did. For example, from 1368 to 1911 there were only two dynasties (Ming and Qing). Compared to the UK, there were very few architectural changes during this period.

Posting a load of pictures of different buildings from China doesn't really prove anything. Many of them are religious buildings that are built in almost every country in the world. I wouldn't class them as architectural styles used in a specific country. London has dozens of mosques but I didn't list them as an architectural style did I? Some of the other buildings are most likely rare examples. You could do this for any country on earth and make it look like that country has an incredibly diverse range of architectural styles. For example, would you class this building as an architectural style of the UK...



I wouldn't. Yet, it is the Brighton Pavillion.

Here is the best list of Chinese architectural styles I could find...

Imperial, Chinese Buddhist, Taoist, Garden, Hutong, Pai Fang, Feng Shui

That's not including the more modern styles that most countries have universally adopted since 1911.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 11:36 AM   #8459
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Originally Posted by Loathing View Post
What a load of absolute bullshit which you've clearly just made up on the spot to make yourself sound knowledgeable. Shame on you.

The Chinese, pre 1911 at least, have greatly revered everything old, preserving ancient buildings and objects with a diligence unseen anywhere in the West.

In fact, the Chinese Emperor and the entire ruling class lived for 500 years in the exact same complex of buildings, architecturally unchanged, from c. 1400-1911.
You're patronising to assume that you've superior knowledge of China. I first visited China in 1996, and I've lost count of how many visits I've made since. I've explored every great Chinese city, and dozens of lesser ones. I've studied China to postgraduate level - not its architecture specifically - but rather Chinese language, history, and politics. My wife is Shanghainese, and we'll raise a bilingual family. For all these reasons, China is not a place I feel ignorant about, at least not compared to other Westerners.

I think you're totally wrong about China preserving cities and objects with the same diligence as the West. Chinese dynasties typically built new capitals and abandoned the old. Former imperial capitals such as Hangzhou, Nanjing, Kaifeng, now have precious little to show for their former glory compared to peers in Europe, Middle East, or India. Beijing is an overwhelmingly modern city, and most of its old hutongs have been destroyed in the last decade or so. This casual destruction of the old has long been a Chinese habit. It's not a mere aberration of the Cultural Revolution. I'm going to quote Ian Buruma, one of my favourite commentators on East Asia...

There is no Chinese, Rome, London or Paris, a repository of centuries of civilization, to be handed on from one generation to the next, cherished as a precious heirloom, meant to last forever. Mao Zedong may have been one of the great vandals of all time, but long before the Chairman was born, travelers in China remarked on the nonchalance with which Chinese let the vestiges of the past rot away. Instead of preserving the old, people would rebuild in the same style. Hence a pagoda erected during the Tang Dynasty, but entirely rebuilt in, say, 1912, would still be regarded as ancient, for it is not so much the age of the bricks as the style or even the site that counts.

It is also true that Chinese connoisseurs tended to make a fetish of the ancient, which explains why China has the oldest industry in fake antiques in the world. But fake, to a Western ear, has a pejorative sound not entirely appropriate to the common Chinese view that a good immitation can be admired in its own right.

Instead of eternal cities, China had eternally shifting cities. With a new dynasty often came a new capital, whose layout was based on geomancy and other signs of auspiciousness. These seats of administrative power sometimes lasted about as long the dynasties that built them were blessed with heaven's mandate. Thus once great cities - Changan, Kaifeng, Hangzhou - are now provincial towns, with only a few monuments, frequently rebuilt throughout the ages, as reminders of past glory.
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Last edited by Langur; November 6th, 2013 at 01:24 PM.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 11:56 AM   #8460
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheNorthRoad View Post
No, but I think this thread needs it so that in the future it can stay focused. Examples from chinese architecture proves a specific statement from a user in this thread completely wrong and made up, as usually happens when a case for national exceptionalism is made.

London's a global city and loved by many myself included. However, exaggerated nationalism/city patriotism coupled with ignorance is really putting people off. I really don't think or hope that some of the views of a minority of the users of this thread is representative.

It seems as there's the notion of british exceptionalism, just as its american cousin and both are equally disgusting to me as well as other kinds of nationalistic excess which I guess most cultures have been through from time to time.

You're f***ing London. You don't need to behave as a Eurovision host from Kabarakhstan. Focus on the projects and let the dick measuring with Paris (which is quite one-sided on ssc I'm afraid) and New York (which is also quite one-sided I'm afraid) stay in the local pub, or at least in the local forums...Just a suggestion. There's a reason this debate is brought up again and again.
Oh I'm with you don't worry, I just wish people would take their debates elsewhere or pm each other.
I just ignore all that nationalistic crap that people spew out.
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