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Old June 29th, 2014, 12:06 AM   #10841
SE9
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Stratford Plaza | Stratford E15

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=332673

Official website: http://www.telfordhomes.plc.uk/stratfordplaza/



Project facts
  • Developer: Telford Homes
  • Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
  • Floors: 26
  • Homes: 198



The latest at Stratford Plaza. Photos by Retro Specs:



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Old June 29th, 2014, 12:18 AM   #10842
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5 Broadgate | City of London EC2

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1186395

Official website: http://www.5broadgate.com/



Project facts
  • Floors: 13
  • Floorspace: 111,000m²
  • Trading floors: 4 (each accommodates 750 traders)
  • New UBS London headquarters
  • Completion: 2016



Update by Core Rising:



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Old June 29th, 2014, 12:25 AM   #10843
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The Peninsula Tower | Greenwich Peninsula SE10

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=632984

Official website: http://www.thepeninsulatower.com/



Project facts
  • Developer: Grove Developments
  • Architect: Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands
  • Floors: 24
  • Homes: 100



Update this week by Core Rising:

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Old June 29th, 2014, 12:33 AM   #10844
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Greenwich Peninsula Regeneration | Greenwich Peninsula SE10

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=632984

Official website: http://www.greenwichpeninsula.co.uk/



Project facts
  • Developer: Knight Dragon
  • Cost: £5 billion ($8bn)
  • Homes: 10,000
  • Site area: 190 acres



Construction update by Core Rising:




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Old June 29th, 2014, 09:14 PM   #10845
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Great stuff.
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Old June 29th, 2014, 11:04 PM   #10846
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Not only the UK. The likes of France (Paris) and particularly South Korea (Seoul) have a main city that's substantially larger by population and economy than the others in their country.

Being able to attract the skilled (especially the skilled young) helps to make a city successful. A successful city will attract people to it, which is what London has increasingly done since the period of decline in the late 20th century. Skilled migration, which is what London intakes, has a net economic benefit to the destination. It's in London's interest to encourage migration whilst investing in homes and the necessary infrastructure. It's not in London's interest to curb its success (thereby curbing migration) or curb migration (thereby curbing its success). They go hand in hand.
However, cities like Toulouse succesfully do something pretty specific (i.e. aerospace) and attract many people in the field (also quite a lot of international students thanks to courses exclusively in English). Cities like Manchester and Birmingham could (and should) do something that London currently doesn't.
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Old June 29th, 2014, 11:30 PM   #10847
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However, cities like Toulouse succesfully do something pretty specific (i.e. aerospace) and attract many people in the field (also quite a lot of international students thanks to courses exclusively in English). Cities like Manchester and Birmingham could (and should) do something that London currently doesn't.
Cities like Cambridge do something pretty specific (i.e. technology) and attract many people in the field.
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Old June 29th, 2014, 11:33 PM   #10848
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However, cities like Toulouse succesfully do something pretty specific (i.e. aerospace) and attract many people in the field (also quite a lot of international students thanks to courses exclusively in English). Cities like Manchester and Birmingham could (and should) do something that London currently doesn't.
Cities apart from London do have specific industries like Aberdeen ie the energy sector. Which attracts a lot of investment and jobs into the oil and gas sector. Also Glasgow has a thriving financial services and renewable energy sector. These cities may not be the powerhouse that London is but they do well for there size and are thriving.
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Old June 29th, 2014, 11:55 PM   #10849
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One of the great failures in the UK's economic transition was neglecting to nurture a luxury clothing and goods industry like France and Italy. England was famous across the world for shoes, suits, shirts, ties, etc. Nowadays there are basically no domestic producers of any of these things, even though they are extremely lucrative and they would be great for diversifying the economy and reducing reliance on finance/services.

Even in very recent years, Burberry has shut down British factories and moved production abroad (mainly to China).
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Old June 30th, 2014, 12:10 AM   #10850
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Quote:
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However, cities like Toulouse succesfully do something pretty specific (i.e. aerospace) and attract many people in the field (also quite a lot of international students thanks to courses exclusively in English).
You can still feel the spirit of brisavoine here.
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Old June 30th, 2014, 12:21 AM   #10851
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Originally Posted by Infinite Jest View Post
One of the great failures in the UK's economic transition was neglecting to nurture a luxury clothing and goods industry like France and Italy. England was famous across the world for shoes, suits, shirts, ties, etc. Nowadays there are basically no domestic producers of any of these things, even though they are extremely lucrative and they would be great for diversifying the economy and reducing reliance on finance/services.

Even in very recent years, Burberry has shut down British factories and moved production abroad (mainly to China).
I think you'll find the material used in some major luxury fashion brands are sourced from the UK. For example, Chanel use harris tweed etc in their clothing lines and they're arguably the biggest fashion house on this planet.
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Old June 30th, 2014, 12:55 AM   #10852
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Nowadays English Mills are dwarfed by the Italian cloth industry, though. A few decades ago the UK was one of the largest cloth producers in the entire world, despite being a tiny nation. English wool is still regarded as the best cloth in the world by connoisseurs, but this country has completely failed to market it internationally (or nationally) as a luxury product worth spending extra on.

Recently a lot of English Mills in Huddersfield and cloth merchants in London have closed down. All of the Macclesfield silk printers (for tie silk and the like) also closed down and we are left with only one (called Adamley).

Similarly Northampton shoemakers moved most of their production to India, when England used to be world famous for its shoes.

Same goes for umbrellas.

Most of Savile Row was left to collapse and rot, too. Almost all of the tailors are foreign-owned now, and most have thrown out their commitment to handmade perfection which made the place famous. And the whole UK ready-to-wear suit industry has shut down entirely: I don't think there's a single factory left. All the while Italian firms sells millions of suits per year at outlandish prices and 1000% profit margins.

These are all goods which could be produced and sold as luxury goods today, and the French and Italians base much of their economies on exactly that.

Coal mines had to be shut down for obvious reasons, but these clothing and apparel industries could still thrive today. Indeed, we are seeing a modest revival in some of these industries as British style has become "fashionable" again, but the factories are gone, as are the skilled workers, and "British" fashion is now made in Italy at the luxury end, and Turkey or India at the high-street end.

Last edited by Infinite Jest; June 30th, 2014 at 01:07 AM.
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Old June 30th, 2014, 02:22 AM   #10853
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However, cities like Toulouse succesfully do something pretty specific (i.e. aerospace) and attract many people in the field (also quite a lot of international students thanks to courses exclusively in English). Cities like Manchester and Birmingham could (and should) do something that London currently doesn't.
Birmingham and the west Midlands have for the first time beaten London in the first quarter of gross exports. It traditionally is known as the manufacturing heartland of the UK and the main area for car production and technology.

It is also the only region in the UK who has a trade surplus with China of some 1.7 billion.

So it is doing something different. It's exporting more goods to the world than London.
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Old June 30th, 2014, 06:02 PM   #10854
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'Bridge East London: could Eastenders finally get this 'crucial missing link'?
Debated for the past 70 years, the plan for a bridge in east London has been subject to endless delays and inquiries. Now it's being called a no-brainer. Is the time finally right?'

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddes...sport-relaunch
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Old June 30th, 2014, 11:45 PM   #10855
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Yes the time is right. It's been right for ages. The only question is: how many bridges. One might not be enough unless it's a massive multilayered thing.

Really, I think Crossrail has opened Londoner's eyes to the realities of contemporary infrastructure projects. And made them more pliable when it comes to public support on the issues.
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Old July 1st, 2014, 12:20 AM   #10856
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stravinsky View Post
However, cities like Toulouse succesfully do something pretty specific (i.e. aerospace) and attract many people in the field (also quite a lot of international students thanks to courses exclusively in English). Cities like Manchester and Birmingham could (and should) do something that London currently doesn't.
Manchester has a massive student population. And is one of the most prominent centres for technology research in Europe. Because of this it has a much younger population than London (the youngest of any city in the UK). It's also the most racially and ethnically diverse city outside the capital, with a disproportionately large LGBT community and nearly a quarter of people identifying as non-religious.

As a result, it's economy is the fastest growing in the UK and it's population experienced the third fastest growth of any city in the British Isles during the last census band. It has the tallest buildings outside of London, with a genuine skyscraper skyline that few others have achieved. It's everything you want a 21st century city to be. It's a city for the people on the internet. The young, fashionable and well-educated generation 2.0 who dictate the cultural zeitgeist of the entire western world.

Manchester is positioning itself as the most left-wing city in the country: smart, innovative, accepting and diverse. A Labour stronghold with fiercely progressive attitudes towards race, religion and sexuality. Building for 2050 not 1950; with the Graphene Institute and Media City and all that international award winning jazz. It's doing this because it can. Because it started so small, and it didn't have any baggage.

London has always been a diverse city. But it has also been hamstrung - as all major cities are - by a conservative core being backed into a corner. Look at Westminster and all the new projects it opposes on an almost daily basis. Or the difficulties in getting any new housing built. Or the runway situation or the Mayor, for Christ's sake. Manchester doesn't have any of that bullshit. It has other bullshit, but 21st century bullshit. That's preferable, in my mind.

You say Manchester has to do something London isn't. Well, it's not only doing something that London isn't, it's doing something that London couldn't, even if it wanted to.

Look, I'm a Londoner. But I've noticed it among colleagues and myself. Eyes starting to look north with a hint of envy. There's a lot of crap in London that I wish we could get rid of. Crap they don't have in the first place. If nothing else, that's a freedom to choose that London doesn't have. London has to evolve, it can't reinvent itself like Manchester has.
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Old July 1st, 2014, 01:50 AM   #10857
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Manchester has a massive student population. And is one of the most prominent centres for technology research in Europe. Because of this it has a much younger population than London (the youngest of any city in the UK). It's also the most racially and ethnically diverse city outside the capital, with a disproportionately large LGBT community and nearly a quarter of people identifying as non-religious.

As a result, it's economy is the fastest growing in the UK and it's population experienced the third fastest growth of any city in the British Isles during the last census band. It has the tallest buildings outside of London, with a genuine skyscraper skyline that few others have achieved. It's everything you want a 21st century city to be. It's a city for the people on the internet. The young, fashionable and well-educated generation 2.0 who dictate the cultural zeitgeist of the entire western world.

Manchester is positioning itself as the most left-wing city in the country: smart, innovative, accepting and diverse. A Labour stronghold with fiercely progressive attitudes towards race, religion and sexuality. Building for 2050 not 1950; with the Graphene Institute and Media City and all that international award winning jazz. It's doing this because it can. Because it started so small, and it didn't have any baggage.

London has always been a diverse city. But it has also been hamstrung - as all major cities are - by a conservative core being backed into a corner. Look at Westminster and all the new projects it opposes on an almost daily basis. Or the difficulties in getting any new housing built. Or the runway situation or the Mayor, for Christ's sake. Manchester doesn't have any of that bullshit. It has other bullshit, but 21st century bullshit. That's preferable, in my mind.

You say Manchester has to do something London isn't. Well, it's not only doing something that London isn't, it's doing something that London couldn't, even if it wanted to.

Look, I'm a Londoner. But I've noticed it among colleagues and myself. Eyes starting to look north with a hint of envy. There's a lot of crap in London that I wish we could get rid of. Crap they don't have in the first place. If nothing else, that's a freedom to choose that London doesn't have. London has to evolve, it can't reinvent itself like Manchester has.
Nice speech. But I think you're in the wrong thread. Not to mention that a lot of your points are debatable at best.
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Old July 1st, 2014, 01:56 AM   #10858
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That's a good answer. What I meant, and I probably expressed in a rather subtle way, is that, internationally, Manchester does not have that prominent cultural image that London has.

What you have written about is not really well known to the outside world, especially considering the amount of marketing we all constantly get about London.
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Old July 1st, 2014, 02:13 AM   #10859
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Very debatable. One. Birmingham demographics actually place it as the youngest city in Europe doesn't it? Maybe Manchester has moved continents. ;-) ... Anyway, it's been a while since we've seen a biggie proposed in London. It's overdue like Yellowstone.
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Old July 1st, 2014, 05:50 AM   #10860
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Stratford Plaza..love the cladding
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