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Old May 11th, 2008, 09:26 PM   #1221
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wjfox View Post
Skyline review

Boris Johnson is planning to topple Ken Livingstone’s schemes for skyscrapers in London.

Johnson’s team are determined to preserve the capital’s skyline, but privately fear that hopes of blocking some projects could descend into a legal quagmire, with developers and architects seeking compensation.

The new mayor has appointed Sir Simon Milton to lead a review of all high-rises planned for the capital. The Westminster councillor became a strident critic of Livingstone’s plans.

Milton said earlier this year: “[Livingstone] has made it very clear that he and his people want more tall buildings.

“This fetish for tall buildings anywhere and everywhere will be a disaster for London.”
There's no need to be afraid of these developements. Projects that aren't under construction by now won't be built anytime soon. The city has dried out of cheap money, companies releasing stuff already which consequently reduces the need for office space. It doesn't need Boris to stop London rising. Tightened credit conditions are much more effective on that matter.
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Old May 13th, 2008, 10:49 PM   #1222
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St Martin-in-the-Fields

Work has almost finished on the renovation of this church - undoubtedly one of London's finest. For those who don't know, it stands on the north-eastern corner of Trafalgar Square. Built in 1721 by James Gibbs, its design was extremely influential in the United States, where it was copied all over the country.

I was there today and managed to get some pics. The new public area at the back is still behind hoardings, but the front façade is now virtually complete. The whole thing looks wonderful - so clean and gleaming white. You can see the new steps which have been completely ripped out and replaced.

I'm not a religious person in the slightest, but I adore religious architecture, and this church (along with St Paul's) is one of my favourite buildings in London. I hope they restore more of these old buildings in the run-up to 2012.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Martin-in-the-Fields
































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Old May 14th, 2008, 06:36 PM   #1223
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Say goodbye to the Trafalgar Sq
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Old May 19th, 2008, 06:58 PM   #1224
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http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standa...ilt/article.do


The towers that Boris could stop being built

Mira Bar-Hillel and Ellen Widdup

19.05.08

Fourteen skyscrapers planned for London may never be built as the 'Boris Johnson effect' ripples across the capital.

An Evening Standard investigation reveals that 11 out of 21 proposed towers are at risk of being vetoed by the new Mayor.

Three supported by local councils could be kicked out after public inquiries amid growing concern that tall buildings are blighting the London skyline.

A further seven, including the 'Walkie-Talkie' at Fenchurch Street, were given planning permission before Mr Johnson was elected and he can't overturn this.

However, sources today warned that even these projects are at risk from the economic downturn as firms lay off staff and cut office space.

Piers Gough of architects CZWG said: "The mood is very grim because there is just no money to build anything really ambitious. Now we have also got a mayor who is known to be unsympathetic. It is very worrying."

Mr Johnson has warned he will not approve skyscrapers if residents are opposed to them and today confirmed he will redraw the planned skyline as a matter of priority.

Developers and architects are also concerned at the influence of Sir Simon Milton as his new planning adviser.

The former head of Westminster council fought off a succession of skyscrapers in central London, including Victoria station, and is seen by some as a 'fogey' when it comes to tall buildings.

Peter Bill, editor of the influential Estate Gazette, said: "The climate in City Hall will change from eager acceptance of any commercial redevelopment to a more sceptical analysis of why it is needed."

The Mayor has the power to veto any project before it has been given planning permission. But under new powers granted only weeks before Ken Livingstone was ousted, the Mayor can also overrule local councils that have refused developments the go-ahead.

Mr Livingstone, a strong advocate of tall buildings, was set to ignore residents' wishes by approving planned developments such as the 'Penny Whistle' in Ealing.

A spokesman for Mr Johnson said today he would work with boroughs.

He continued: "The Mayor is concerned the London Plan actively promotes tall buildings. He has nothing against tall buildings but thinks they should be placed where appropriate.

"Furthermore, he is concerned that tall buildings in London do not block historic views. The London Plan will be amended to introduce balance on the placing of tall buildings in London."






1. Ealing Broadway Leaf Development (Penny Whistle)

Developer Glenkerrin UK's proposals have been sent back to the drawing board after being rejected by planners thought to be influenced by Boris Johnson's election.

Height: 143 metres (470 feet) and 40 storeys under original plans.

Location: Ealing Broadway.

Status: On hold while developer draws up a new scheme. Planning application for new designs
expected by end of year.

Boris effect: Already a victory for the new mayor as he was known to oppose this suburban tower. Developer now promises tower 'will not be a skyscraper' but Mr Johnson could still object.




2. 100 West Cromwell Road (Tesco Tower)

Nicknamed the Tesco Tower because the land is owned by the supermarket giant, the revised plans offer 367 apartments, a gym, swimming pool, creche and 610 parking spaces.

Height: 82m (270ft) and 24 storeys.

Location: West Cromwell Road W14.

Status: The application was submitted in March after developer Multiplex Living changed the design to try to satisfy Kensington and Chelsea council.

Boris effect: The Mayor's presence in City Hall will encourage the Conservative-run council to reject an unacceptable scheme.




3. Victoria Transport Interchange

Developer Land Securities was forced to change plans from two 128m towers and a third building of 90m after the council said it would ruin the view from Buckingham Palace. Now just one tower will house flats, offices and shops.

Height: 80m (262ft) and 20 storeys.

Status: Planning application due to be submitted in the summer.

Boris effect: A victory for the Mayor as plans have been scaled down massively, but he will be watching the details very closely.




4. The Ram Brewery (Wandsworth Towers)

Two residential skyscrapers supposed to create a 'new urban quarter' and comprising 1,000 apartments as well as 200,000 sq ft of shops, restaurants and offices.

Height: Up to 145m (475ft) with 39 storeys and 29 storeys.

Location: 16.5-acre site of the Young's Ram Brewery, Ram Street, SW18.

Status: Planning application submitted in February and approval for the scheme to be sought before the summer.

Boris effect: If residents around this development express outrage, the Mayor will have to intervene to keep his campaign pledge.




5. Heart of Battersea Towers (Clapham Junction skyscrapers)

Two towers with 500 homes to dwarf buildings for miles around Clapham Junction station. Platforms will also be revamped by Delancey and Land Securities with nine new lifts and the shopping centre will be developed.

Height: 170m (557ft) and 40 storeys.

Location: Clapham Junction.

Status: Plans to be submitted within next month.
Boris effect: The Mayor is likely to bow to local opinion and, if there are objections, intervene.




6. Vauxhall Cross Island Towers

Twin-tower scheme with a mixture of one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments as well as offices and a 220-bed business hotel. Ken Livingstone was instrumental in the Greater London Authority's London Plan which designated Vauxhall an opportunity area — a place 'with potential for significant increase in density'.

Height: one tower of 100m (328ft) and the other 170m (557ft).

Location: Vauxhall Cross SE1.

Status: Planning application still to be
submitted after developer was sent away amid complaints about a lack of affordable housing.

Boris effect: He will examine this one very closely in case the towers affect important views — a key pledge for the new Mayor.




7. Doon Street Tower

Supposed to provide 329 apartments on South Bank as well as a shopping centre, swimming pool, leisure centre and large landscaped gardens.

Height: 144m (427ft) and 43 storeys under the
original plans.

Location: Doon Street, next to Waterloo Bridge, SE1

Status: After massive opposition from English Heritage, the scheme by Coin Street Community Builders went to public inquiry and the result is due from Communities Secretary Hazel Blears in July.

Boris effect: The Mayor could try to kill off this project by making an immediate submission to Ms Blears.




8. Beetham Tower (the Boomerang)

Also known as the Jumeirah Tower, it boasts that each of its 96 flats and 261 hotel rooms would have a conservatory.

Height: 170m (557ft) and 49 storeys.

Location: Junction of Blackfriars Road and Stamford Street, South Bank, SE1.

Status: The design was scaled down from 219 metres and developer the Beetham Organisation eventually won round English Heritage. But it was 'called in' by Hazel Blears for a public inquiry to ask if it will really improve the area.

Boris effect: Another opportunity for the Mayor to lobby the public inquiry into a tower that many say is too close to surrounding tall projects.




9. 20 Blackfriars Road

Tower with 243 apartments, offices and some shops with parking for 82 cars on the ground floor by developer Circleplane.

Height: 148m (485ft) and 43 storeys.

Location: 20 Blackfriars Road SE1.

Status: Approved by Southwark council in January but was called in by Hazel Blears just days after
Mr Johnson won the mayoral election. The prime reason for her move is to examine the appropriateness of a very tall building in this location. There are rumours it has more to do with the forces at work in the Mayor's camp.

Boris effect: Mr Johnson may well try to influence the inquiry into this disputed South Bank scheme.




10. Eileen House

Tower expected to contain 340 flats and offices. Developer Oakmayne says penthouses will be available in the peaked tip of the building and will be higher than the Barbican towers.

Height: 143m (470ft) and 47 storeys.

Location: Newington Causeway, Elephant and Castle, SE1.

Status: Council is in early talks with developers.

Boris effect: The Mayor can get involved at an early stage to prevent 'inappropriate' designs.




11. Cherry Orchard Road

Four skyscrapers will tower over East Croydon station, with three containing 1,300 homes and one reserved for offices. Shops and cafés are also earmarked for the six-acre site. Developer Menta says one of the towers will be the tallest residential building in the capital.

Height: 160m (525ft) and 52 storeys.

Location: Cherry Orchard Road CR0

Status: Planning application due to be submitted in the autumn.

Boris effect: If the council is in favour the location next to a major railway station may convince Mr Johnson not to oppose.




12. 151 City Road

The tower close to Old Street roundabout will include an apartment hotel, shops, bars and a fitness centre. Self-storage spaces would also be stacked vertically instead of horizontally for the first time in London.

Height: 140m (460ft) and 43 storeys.

Location: City Road EC1.

Status: No planning application submitted yet.
Boris effect: The developer may yet lower the height of the tower to avoid a confrontation.




13. Sugar House Tower

The wedge-shaped tower is designed at an angle of 73.6 degrees and is supposed to include 410 flats and 830 square metres of shops.

Height: 158m (518ft) and 44 storeys.

Location: Off Stratford High Street, next to River Lea, E15.

Status: No planning application submitted yet.

Boris effect: A key decision for the Mayor as this is clearly a suburban location and the tower is extremely prominent. However, if there is no local opposition, he is likely to let it happen.




14. Bishops Place

Three towers designed to hold at least 310 flats and an 80-bed hotel. Developer Hammerson is planning other towers nearby but it is bitterly opposed by the Save Shoreditch campaign group.

Height: 160m (524ft) and 50 storeys.

Location: Norton Folgate/Shoreditch High Street EC2

Status: Planning application has been submitted and is due before the planning sub-committee within months.

Boris effect: Given the strength of local opposition, Mr Johnson is likely to act quickly and use his veto.
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Old May 21st, 2008, 12:41 AM   #1225
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How to joke around with a clown

St Paul's gets a face-lift to appease London's new Mayor



Recently the UK's resident 'clown' politician Boris Johnson was appointed as Mayor of London. His manifesto stated that he would protect historical views and in particular, "Reinstate planning rules that protect the views of St Paul’s Cathedral and the Palace of Westminster and reinforce protection around new viewing corridors". In other words he would prevent any tall building in the centre of London that threatens this view.

In the spirit of protecting views of St Paul's, architects Feix&Merlin have come up with a novel idea of how to ensure the historic building can be seen from afar. The company have revealed renders of a 50-storey tower to raise the roof of St Paul's cathedral, so that its trademark dome could be seen above any other tall building.



Merlin explained to WAN why they decided to do the redesign: "It's a response to St Paul's cathedral having a strangle-hold on the London skyline...It's a tongue-in-cheek response to Boris' plans and to say we shouldn't be restricting the upward ascent of London...We want people to think about what they want from London. Do they want a historic relic or do you want it to move forward?"

Although it was designed as a statement, Merlin added that he would be happy to assist anyone who wished to take the plans forward. I wonder if Boris would consider it?..

Niki May Young
News Editor, worldarchitecturenews.com
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 06:02 PM   #1226
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Yes, I understand that the the historical buildings in London need to be preserved, but that can't stop the city moving foreward. High rise buildings are needed in London to try and slow the urban sprawl and keep the city growing.
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 06:29 PM   #1227
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Quote:
Millionaire eyes up Millharbour site for residential tower

MILLIONAIRE Michael Hunt is hoping to build a 227-unit two-tower development in Millharbour.

The Hove-based property magnate is bidding to construct the residential and retail project on the current site of a synagogue at 45 Millharbour.

The dockside scheme is within the Millennium Quarter tower cluster, and just across the water from the residential project being built on the London Arena site.

Mr Hunt's Hovedean Properties company has employed Millbank-based EPR Architects to design two conjoined L-shaped blocks with heights of six, 11, 16 and 22 storeys. Around 38 per cent of the units will be earmarked for affordable housing.
Rest at link above.
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 06:31 PM   #1228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozric View Post
I understand that the the historical buildings in London need to be preserved, but that can't stop the city moving foreward.
My sentiments exactly.

Meanwhile, a scoping application has been submitted for the pub in Canary Wharf that is getting a Norman Foster designed resi skyscraper...

Quote:
Originally Posted by oliviersa View Post
LBTH: Request for draft Scoping Opinion on demolition of City Pride PH and redevelopment to provide a 55 to 65 storey tower comprising hotel and residential accommodation.
Using the average heights for residential towers in Canary wharf, we can determine that this should be between 175m if they go for the shortest option and 210m if they go for the tallest option.

There are two towers of 100m and 140m under construction right next door, and another two planned on the other side of those which should be about 160m and 130m, so it could be about to get very dense on that street.
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 06:38 PM   #1229
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pricemazda View Post
Say goodbye to the Trafalgar Sq
Eh?
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 07:39 PM   #1230
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pricemazda View Post
Say goodbye to the Trafalgar Sq
Confused also..
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Old May 24th, 2008, 10:13 PM   #1231
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The new mayor in London makes a different politic about the city.

Lies, Damned Lies and Newspaper Reports


London's best selling newspaper, the Evening Standard, has been running a lot lately on skyscrapers and looking at how the change of mayor from Ken Livingstone to Boris Johnson could affect things.

Unfortunately in typical Standard style, there's a yawning gulf between the skyscraper loving ex mayor they report about and the reality of the situation.

The article by Mira Bar-Hillel and Ellen Widdup published on the 20th of May specifically attacks Ken Livingstone for being "set to ignore residents' wishes by approving planned developments such as the 'Penny Whistle' in Ealing."

This is totally utterly untrue as the published planning reports on the scheme for the Broadway Leaf that Ken Livingstone signed off on prove.

"The Mayor was particularly disappointed by the unacceptably low proportion of affordable housing within the scheme, and felt that despite the high costs of development, a more significant contribution could have been offered if it had been designed more efficiently. He was also concerned about the failure to resolve the need for an interchange bus terminus...The Mayor indicated that he would be minded to direct your Council to refuse planning permission"

Quite how "minded to direct... to refuse planning permission" morphs into what the Evening Standard is reporting is unclear but what is really shocking is that this opinion from the former Mayor's office doesn't come from secret planning documents that no-one can see - they are all in the public domain and well known within planning circles. The development had even been put on hold before the elections took place.

Of course, as we have already seen, this means that Boris Johnson will be standing up and taking the credit for having had the project shelved even though it already had nowhere to run except a redesign before he was elected.

If want to see what Ken Livingstone really thinks of the Broadway Leaf you can read the report here -
london.gov.uk/mayor/planning_decisions/strategic_dev/2008/20080220/the_leaf_former_arcadia_shopping_centre_report.pdf

Published on 23-05-2008 by James Newman
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Old May 24th, 2008, 10:15 PM   #1232
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Ian Ritchies Daleks Finally Exterminated.

Ian Ritchie Architects has confirmed they have been dumped unceremoniously from the controversial plans by Berkeley Homes to develop Potter's Fields, a site near London's famous Tower Bridge, into eight towers.

The development had proven acrimonious with the architect and developer being opposed by the local council at every step and having to fight a public inquiry to get the go ahead for their project.

At the heart of this was the effect of the eight towers nicknamed "the Daleks" thanks to their cylindrical appearance on the setting of Tower Bridge, and whether they would provide a suitable backdrop or drown out the pastiche Victorian Gothic that the river crossing is famous for.

Even with planning permission eventually secured following a lengthy public inquiry, Southwark Council refused to cooperate with Berkeley Homes and give them the help that they needed to make the scheme happen.

With a new change in mayor for London having happened who is much less sympathetic to developers and clearly mapping out his territory against prominent high-rises, Berkeley Homes has lost their biggest political ally in the capital and finally dropped Ian Ritchie Architects.

Faced with nowhere else to go, Berkeley Homes have now rebooted the scheme to square A and working in close contact with Southwark Council on a new design by an as yet unnamed architect that will please the local politicians, and hopefully prove less controversial.



oh no!
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Old May 26th, 2008, 12:10 AM   #1233
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A video I made today:

http://www.willfox.com/movies/greenwich_peninsula.wmv (3 minutes / 35mb)

This is Greenwich Peninsula, a major regeneration project. I took some pics from Google Earth and combined them with videos from the official website, then added music and a couple of photos.
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Old May 26th, 2008, 01:31 AM   #1234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wjfox View Post
A video I made today:

http://www.willfox.com/movies/greenwich_peninsula.wmv (3 minutes / 35mb)

This is Greenwich Peninsula, a major regeneration project. I took some pics from Google Earth and combined them with videos from the official website, then added music and a couple of photos.
Awsome just awsome al hole new city .

Keep up the good work!
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Old May 29th, 2008, 01:38 AM   #1235
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New pics of the 145m Newfoundland Tower in Canary Wharf, showing it with the 191m 1 Park Place next door. Thanks to London Lad for finding:

Quote:
Originally Posted by london lad View Post
[IMG]http://i29.************/14nij4x.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i28.************/15oed8h.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i28.************/a5dh8x.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i32.************/30t5e0z.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i31.************/slnpyu.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i27.************/2l89a1e.jpg[/IMG]
The bottom pic is missing a lot of proposals, and has the older, shorter design of Wood Wharf to the right.
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Old May 31st, 2008, 11:27 PM   #1236
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Isle of Dog's is really booming! It'll be amazing to see this area in a few years time!
Forget Boris - he'll just be a small blip on the otherwise continuing progress of the city's skyline, at least much of his term will be in a period of slow market growth and consequent skyscraper development in London anyway.
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Old June 14th, 2008, 02:44 PM   #1237
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Some new panoramic renders. Big thanks to London Lad for finding.

[IMG]http://i29.************/x3zkea.jpg[/IMG]

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Old June 15th, 2008, 12:07 PM   #1238
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Old June 17th, 2008, 11:02 AM   #1239
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New mayor to launch his grand vision for a livable city...

The “all powerful” new London Mayor, Boris Johnson and his architecture Tsar, Peter Bishop will use this week’s launch of the London Festival of Architecture as a platform to unveil his radical blueprint for London. But could this Grand Strategy for developing a utopian metropolis of the future, formed in just six weeks since his inauguration, simply be a Sarkozy style political “branding exercise” rather than addressing the real and more complex issues of Londoners such as transportation.

It is already well known in architectural circles that the incoming mayor does not share his predecessor’s support of tall buildings, but until now little other detail of his views has been forthcoming.

However, indications are that he will unveil a series of initiatives this week aimed at making London a “liveable city” to compete with other world cities such as Shanghai and Mumbai.
His far-reaching plans are believed to include; moving Heathrow Airport across London to the Thames Estuary in the east; raising some of the culverted Thames tributaries back to the surface as urban water features; re-building the Skylon, the iconic 1950’s cigar shaped structure; creating traffic-free cycle superhighways; building a riverside promenade on the north side of the Thames (involving taking the traffic underground) and the creation of a tree lined pedestrian boulevard from Primrose Hill in the north to the Embankment via Oxford Circus and Trafalgar Square. Johnson also favours keeping tall buildings in clusters and three locations have already been identified, City, Canary Wharf and Croydon in the South.

The thread running through Johnson’s vision is said to be raising the “quality of life” but many of the elements of his vision seems uncannily familiar. Could Johnson have simply cherry picked successes from other leading world cities and pinned them onto his Grand Plan map on his new office wall in city hall?

In particular, the plans for moving Heathrow are almost certainly following a global trend for replacing tired airports with brand new Mega Hubs, such as Hong Kong’s Chek Lap Kok and the new Dubai World Central International Airport. The cycle initiative is probably fuelled by the hugely successful Parisian Velib project, whereas the riverside promenades could be a Chinese import based on
Shanghai’s iconic Bund. No prizes for guessing the origin of the tree lined boulevard - Barcelona’s las Ramblas being one of the most the most successful urban development projects in recent times. As for raising the rivers, this is a clever move as waterside developments are increasingly popular with both developers and residents, and this plan also draws on London’s historic past. Nice one Boris.

So what is wrong with just harvesting the best of the best? Well, whilst most of the elements, taken in isolation have merits and indeed are “sponsored” by eminent architects, are they addressing the real needs of Londoners and the silent mass of the capital’s working population who don’t actually live there, or tourists…. ? Ask anyone standing on a Victoria line platform in the rush hour what they think of spending millions raising rivers and you will get an answer very quickly.
The only thing that Johnson seems to have missed appears to be a Bilbao inspiration. Maybe there is a queue at Franks...oh and yes, one last thing Mr Mayor, who picks up the tab?



Editor: Michael Hammond


source: WAN
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Old June 17th, 2008, 01:33 PM   #1240
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Very odd about the moving of Heathrow. Why would this be done when Terminal 5 as such a great cost was recently completed, and the horrors of T1,2 and 3 will shortly be over in a few years after major reconstruction.

However, the other points are very good with the exception of the Skylon. ?? This was really nothing special and there is little need for it to be a highlight.

As for his thought on tower clusters, I can agree with this. Clusters really do look better than single towers spotted throughout the city.

But the article starts of really weird.
"indications are that he will unveil a series of initiatives this week aimed at making London a “liveable city” to compete with other world cities such as Shanghai and Mumbai."

Using Shanghai and Mumbai as examples of "liveable cities" is rather odd. Mumbai is total chaos, from traffic that hardly moves, to a very small and dilapidated rail network for the large population, not to mention the slums.
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