daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > City/Metro Compilations

City/Metro Compilations Help report active highrise/urban developments occurring in your city to the global SSC community.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old February 5th, 2015, 01:33 PM   #12841
SE9
South East Nine
 
SE9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London
Posts: 33,904
Likes (Received): 59958

Wood Wharf | Tower Hamlets E14

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=317626

Official website: http://www.woodwharf.com/



Project facts
  • Developer: Canary Wharf Group
  • Cost: £2 billion ($3bn)
  • Homes: 3,100
  • Retail space: 2.57 million ft²
  • Public space: 8.9 acres

Detailed plans for four development plots have been submitted for approval. These plots include three towers above 100m:

- Building A1: 204m | 57 floors | Herzon & de Meuron

- Building E4: 189m | 53 floors | Kohn Pedersen Fox

- Building E2: 123m | 37 floors | Grid Architects













__________________
-
SE9 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old February 5th, 2015, 01:41 PM   #12842
SE9
South East Nine
 
SE9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London
Posts: 33,904
Likes (Received): 59958

New Covent Garden Market | Nine Elms SW8

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=993667

Official website: http://www.vsm-ncgm.co.uk/



Project facts
  • Developer: St Mowden and Vinci
  • Architect: Foster + Partners and Neil Tomlinson
  • Cost: £2 billion ($3bn)
  • Site area: 57 acres
  • Homes: 3,019
  • Various towers, up to 177m

Construction on New Covent Garden Market will commence this spring:

- Look West London: New Covent Garden work to start

- Construction Enquirer: Spring start for new £2bn Covent Garden Market

- Building: St Modwen's £2bn New Covent Garden scheme to start by summer












__________________
-
SE9 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 02:02 PM   #12843
LDN N7
N7
 
LDN N7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: London
Posts: 3,034
Likes (Received): 1664

Quote:
Originally Posted by GB1 View Post
I think inno4321 is basing his view on that in London British born citzens are in the minority, which is true. Which is why people out side of London see it as a problem that's needs tackling. I take the view that what needs tackling is the supply and demand problem ie housing and infrastructure.

It isn't true. London still has a majority of British born citizens.
LDN N7 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 02:28 PM   #12844
SE9
South East Nine
 
SE9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London
Posts: 33,904
Likes (Received): 59958

Quote:
Originally Posted by LDN N7 View Post
It isn't true. London still has a majority of British born citizens.
Indeed, that's another statistic that those outside the city sometimes tend to get wrong.
__________________
-
SE9 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 02:29 PM   #12845
SE9
South East Nine
 
SE9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London
Posts: 33,904
Likes (Received): 59958

Horizons | Blackwall E14

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1680827

Official website: http://www.telfordhomes.plc.uk/horizons/



Project facts
  • Address: Horizons, Yabsley Street, London E14
  • Developer: Telford Homes
  • Architect: RMA Architects
  • Floors: 26
  • Homes: 190



Horizons viewed from its north-east. Photo by chest:

__________________
-

lafreak84, Highrisetower319 liked this post
SE9 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 02:34 PM   #12846
SE9
South East Nine
 
SE9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London
Posts: 33,904
Likes (Received): 59958

Newfoundland | Canary Wharf E14

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1632163

Official website: http://canarywharf.com/residential/newfoundland/



Project facts
  • Address: Newfoundland, Bank Street, London E14
  • Developer: Canary Wharf Group
  • Architect: Horden Cherry Lee
  • Height: 220m
  • Floors: 60



Enabling works ongoing for Newfoundland, 1 Bank Street and 10 Bank Street. Photo by chest:

__________________
-

lafreak84, Highrisetower319, J349 liked this post
SE9 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 02:35 PM   #12847
LDN N7
N7
 
LDN N7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: London
Posts: 3,034
Likes (Received): 1664

Quote:
Originally Posted by SE9 View Post
Indeed, that's another statistic that those outside the city sometimes tend to get wrong.

People must go to London and assume that the millions of foreign looking people actually live in London… most of them are merely tourists.
LDN N7 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 03:01 PM   #12848
SalaciousCrumb
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 10
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by LDN N7 View Post
People must go to London and assume that the millions of foreign looking people actually live in London… most of them are merely tourists.
In central London obviously. My commute home though which takes me wayout of the central District and yet still the majority of people I travel with are not speaking English. Sometimes I see classes of children get on the train in East London off on a school trip somewhere, and it really can appear that the whole class are the children of very recently arrived immigrants. This is probably what the Inddo guy is referring to. The demographics of London have completely changed in my 20 plus years of working there. In 15-20 years the place will be all but unrecognisable from the one I knew. But change is inevitable, but I do believe the pace of it has accelerated massively since the new millennium
SalaciousCrumb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 03:16 PM   #12849
JimB
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 11,016
Likes (Received): 4786

I would estimate that roughly one in two conversations that I overhear in London these days (on the tube or bus; in the street; in a shop; at a bar or restaurant etc) are in a foreign language. Huge change from 25-30 years ago.

It's not altogether a bad thing. I love that London is so multicultural. But I do hope that the essence of old London isn't lost.
JimB no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 03:17 PM   #12850
potto
Registered User
 
potto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London
Posts: 17,696
Likes (Received): 9104

Quote:
Originally Posted by SalaciousCrumb View Post
The point about infrastructure is that it lags behind, so if we continue to increase the population at the rate we are does not make sense to me. You probably will have noticed that public spending is not available in the same amounts as it was. More cuts will be on the way no matter who gets in. Housing, hospitals, schools, roads are all under funded as it is.
It depends what is completely inadequate infrastructure. Sure the infinitely more rapid growth rates of other cities around the world that didn't even have a comprehensive sewerage system when the far larger rural population migrated there in the space of a decade didn't have adequate infrastructure, similar to London 200 years ago. However many cities in the 20th century handled the same situation with relative ease, particularly in South East Asia where the economic growth was invested back into infrastructure. Comparing what is projected for London in the next 30 years with that sort of situation is well a bit hysterical, London has already been there and done that!

Anyway it is just political, of course London can afford it even with the austerity slogan banded around, London is one of the richest cities in the world and more inhabitants means more economic vibrancy and brutally more taxes; not everyone is going to fall desperately ill or have children. Maybe if London took more control of its finances then all those other towns will put out an emergency call for economic migrants of their own

I find it ironic that the people who seem to moan about a growing population using up all their entitled facilities are usually living in extremely inefficient low density urban configurations where the cost per person of the reach of infrastructure is high and ultimately subsidised by others.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SalaciousCrumb View Post
"The general experience of seeing other people about is a healthy situation" is purely subjective. Some people prefer isolation, others the hustle and bustle of living on top of one another. I suspect most would settle for something in between - which is neither akin to living in Northern Canada or the centre of Tokyo.
It isn't subjective at all, it is a fact/reality. Humans are social creatures. We have lived densely since time began. No one lives in true isolation, even the executive in their countryside house with a high wall. I agree however that personal space is important for the human state of mind which is why I would vote for anyone proposing generous minimum living space standards across the board which were stupidly removed in the 1980s bowing to the sole greed of the development lobby. Note this was done in times of a falling/stagnant population so can't blame the more recent population increase there.

Personal space has nothing to do with natural wilderness, that is just greed or fantasy. Personal space or even space in general is design and engineering and management, which is where our shared interest in tall buildings comes into play. Not only for opening up ground level spaces for recreation but for being the economic enabler for mass transit (de-congests the streets for humans) and other facilities. Using the multi-storey concept for increasing space on limited land is hardly an untested modern concept!

I would also highly disagree with your perception of the crammed streets of London, outside of the typically busy high street or cultural attraction where a person would be concerned if there wasn't a crowd even in a small town, the vaster more residential areas of London actually come across as devoid of people and activity which as research shows is not good for crime rates (stress levels going up right there!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by SalaciousCrumb View Post
I really can't understand people's mindset who advocate we continue to rapidly increase the population. Please tell me why you think this is beneficial? Is it really down to the fact that we might build lots more pretty, tall skyscrapers...
In what context is it rapid? There is growth yes and the rate certainly wont be consistent, but rapid? Compared to past growth periods in London? Other cities around the globe? Maybe it is rapid when comparing locally to the last 40 years but what if we projected a trajectory from 1971, would have led to a real disaster for London ie no one left!
__________________

stevekeiretsu liked this post

Last edited by potto; February 5th, 2015 at 04:26 PM.
potto no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 03:23 PM   #12851
SE9
South East Nine
 
SE9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: London
Posts: 33,904
Likes (Received): 59958

Quote:
Originally Posted by SalaciousCrumb View Post
In central London obviously. My commute home though which takes me wayout of the central District and yet still the majority of people I travel with are not speaking English. Sometimes I see classes of children get on the train in East London off on a school trip somewhere, and it really can appear that the whole class are the children of very recently arrived immigrants. This is probably what the Inddo guy is referring to. The demographics of London have completely changed in my 20 plus years of working there. In 15-20 years the place will be all but unrecognisable from the one I knew. But change is inevitable, but I do believe the pace of it has accelerated massively since the new millennium
The majority of schoolchildren in London schools were born in London. The city's population growth is primarily driven by birthrate. London's schoolchildren outperform those in every other part of the country academically. Your impression that there's schools here in which classes are filled by recently arrived immigrants, to a Londoner, sounds like a UKIP soundbite.

Similar case with the anecdote that your commute ride from the distant suburbs is full of people speaking anything but English. When the commuter towns are monocultural relative to London.
__________________
-

potto, the spliff fairy liked this post
SE9 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 03:36 PM   #12852
Bligh
Registered User
 
Bligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: London
Posts: 1,440
Likes (Received): 796

Quote:
Originally Posted by inno4321 View Post

As Seoulite I am. I agree with you Seoul and Tokyo is a city sardine can.

But I little bit skeptical about London expand through horizontal and growth population by accept immigrant.
Because I heard that not only london but also whole western europe suffer by immigrant problem. especially Islamic.

This is not offenses means and I respect all religion. But If they want to become some city's citizens then first he/she must adapting own personal culture and mind. especially religion and ethic aspect. Unless they don't deserved to live in there as citizens.
For the sake of prosperity a City's future a consist citizens's Quality is very important. Unless city's tradition and COLOR overwhelm by immigrant.

Such like a case ecosystem disturb species.

In short London preserved she's own mixed color as world capital meanwhile must control immigrant who didn't respect london's identity.
Am I the only one who cracked up when reading this!?

Not because of the content but because of the grammar. "especially Islamic" got my laughing.

Atleast his English is 1000times better than my Korean!


In all seriousness I believe that it's a minority of people who are worried about immigration. London is the most multi-cultured place on earth and I think this is a truly positive thing.
__________________
~
"when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford."
— Samuel Johnson
~

L O N D O N
~

instagram//photography: @leaf.it.out.luke
Bligh no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 03:44 PM   #12853
Bligh
Registered User
 
Bligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: London
Posts: 1,440
Likes (Received): 796

Quote:
Originally Posted by SE9 View Post
The majority of schoolchildren in London schools were born in London. The city's population growth is primarily driven by birthrate. London's schoolchildren outperform those in every other part of the country academically. Your impression that there's schools here in which classes are filled by recently arrived immigrants, to a Londoner, sounds like a UKIP soundbite.

Similar case with the anecdote that your commute ride from the distant suburbs is full of people speaking anything but English. When the commuter towns are monocultural relative to London.
Indeed. Most the commuter towns in Essex are mostly White-British Communities with an ethnic minority.

Basildon for example was a new-town build for the post-war London Overspill. It now serves the same purpose where many Londoners migrate to Basildon because it's simply cheaper and still within distance of Central London.

Towns like this are becoming much more diverse, but still not on the same level as London or say Birmingham.
__________________
~
"when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford."
— Samuel Johnson
~

L O N D O N
~

instagram//photography: @leaf.it.out.luke
Bligh no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 04:02 PM   #12854
potto
Registered User
 
potto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London
Posts: 17,696
Likes (Received): 9104

Quote:
Originally Posted by SalaciousCrumb View Post
In central London obviously. My commute home though which takes me wayout of the central District and yet still the majority of people I travel with are not speaking English. Sometimes I see classes of children get on the train in East London off on a school trip somewhere, and it really can appear that the whole class are the children of very recently arrived immigrants. This is probably what the Inddo guy is referring to. The demographics of London have completely changed in my 20 plus years of working there. In 15-20 years the place will be all but unrecognisable from the one I knew. But change is inevitable, but I do believe the pace of it has accelerated massively since the new millennium
I know it is a bit facetious plucking from distant history, but hey who originally built London and then who actually bothered to realise its potential and inhabited the ruins after the first-wave left in a panic? Fast forward and even some of the people behind modern London were immigrants, is anyone going to actually thank Prince Albert for coming here?

But you know today there is more than a whiff of that horrible little-Englander cultural disease that would be almost un-recognisable to those who created modern London, the Victorians. They would be aghast looking at us pussying around over infrastructure getting all into a knot over population growth. I doubt if they would want to call themselves British after listening to the sad excuses of those home owners complaining about a new sewer or shock horror a new railway line or heavens forbid a new building appearing somewhere on the skyline! You know its not really the immigrants who have the political clout or links with the media or establishment to multiply their outrage into actual action.

If there is something that is not quite working then it is the deranged and very English inspired cultural clash and I'm not talking about hot curry, but the self defeating combination of a centuries long rural idyll fantasy (Country mansion followed by early 20th C garden city then suburbia then the New Towns) and the post-modernist consumerist active encouragement of self-righteous nimbyism. So if all the English leave because they want to keep up with the Jones's or are forced to because they don't think they are getting value for money when their council house gets split into multiple bedsits for rich students, then why complain about the effect when you are part of the cause or be a tiny bit surprised that others are willing to fill in? Certainly don't complain about the cost of infrastructure when we go a sprawling!

Oh and yes how we did go a sprawling! Look at all those modern, peaceful and vibrant growing cities, some larger than London, full of skyscrapers and a mix of people that the British helped to set up around the world
__________________

SE9, Bligh, AbidM, 11001001, virtuesoft liked this post

Last edited by potto; February 5th, 2015 at 07:37 PM.
potto no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 04:23 PM   #12855
hugh
Registered User
 
hugh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 2,728
Likes (Received): 1227

In the last New Covent Garden render there's a guy who looks like Jamie Dornan's Paul Spector (The Fall) - perhaps on the lookout for a new prospect.
__________________
In art we trust.
hugh no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 05:10 PM   #12856
SomeKindOfBug
Registered User
 
SomeKindOfBug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Manchester
Posts: 1,042
Likes (Received): 1035

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimB View Post
I would estimate that roughly one in two conversations that I overhear in London these days (on the tube or bus; in the street; in a shop; at a bar or restaurant etc) are in a foreign language. Huge change from 25-30 years ago.

It's not altogether a bad thing. I love that London is so multicultural. But I do hope that the essence of old London isn't lost.
But that is the essence of old London.

During the reign of Henry VIII, London was described as the world's centre of fashion. During Elizabeth's reign, London had 1/6th of the world's immigrants - meaning of all the people during that time that moved from one part of the world to another, 15% moved to London.

In the eighteenth century, London was the world's largest manufacturer of books in a language other than English, with enormous printers all along the south bank of the Thames. There were embroiderers from France, weavers from the Netherlands. Silk merchants from the far east, dyers from the low countries, gun-makers from Italy and Turkey. There was more opium being imported to London than any other city, and there were more languages spoken within its boundaries than at any other point in history - and that's true even to this day.

Even the name, London, was coined by a foreigner. It's history is one of multiculturalism and immigration. It's the world's melting pot, and whatever sense of 'old London' people have simply isn't a fair reflection on the city itself. There has never been a point in its entire history, stretching back 2000 years, where there weren't immigrants dominating the landscape. It's the best thing about London. It's what every city on Earth will be like in a couple of hundred years.

People talk about there being some huge change in the ethnic composition of the city in ...what? The last twenty years? But they weren't around for the Viking invasions, or the subsequent Danish settlements in the eighth century. Or the Swedes in the ninth. Or the Irish in the thirteenth. Or the huguenots in the sixteenth. The european jews in the seventeenth. The chinese in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth. Or the west africans and caribbeans in the 1950s and 60s. There isn't a ten year period in the last two thousand years when London hasn't been infused with a new culture or a new set of immigrants. People talk of change as though it's something that happens to London, when in fact London itself is change, and always will be.
__________________
SomeKindOfBug no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 05:48 PM   #12857
GB1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 393
Likes (Received): 146

Quote:
Originally Posted by LDN N7 View Post
It isn't true. London still has a majority of British born citizens.
Having looked into it more, it is the white British born citzens who are in the minority, where they used to represent 59.6% in 2001 but this has dropped to 44% in the last census in 2011. The reasons stated for this is the so called 'white flight' and immigration where the majority of ethnic born British citzens coming from immigrant parents. Maybe this what inno4321 is getting at ?

Last edited by GB1; February 5th, 2015 at 07:01 PM.
GB1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 06:27 PM   #12858
LDN N7
N7
 
LDN N7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: London
Posts: 3,034
Likes (Received): 1664

I didn't realise that 'white' and 'British' were synonymous.
__________________

VDB, SE9, Stravinsky, Bligh liked this post
LDN N7 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 06:37 PM   #12859
GB1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 393
Likes (Received): 146

I think you just haven't realised what my point is.
GB1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2015, 07:24 PM   #12860
Langur
Londinium langur
 
Langur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: London
Posts: 9,390
Likes (Received): 1640

Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeKindOfBug View Post
But that is the essence of old London.

During the reign of Henry VIII, London was described as the world's centre of fashion. During Elizabeth's reign, London had 1/6th of the world's immigrants - meaning of all the people during that time that moved from one part of the world to another, 15% moved to London.

In the eighteenth century, London was the world's largest manufacturer of books in a language other than English, with enormous printers all along the south bank of the Thames. There were embroiderers from France, weavers from the Netherlands. Silk merchants from the far east, dyers from the low countries, gun-makers from Italy and Turkey. There was more opium being imported to London than any other city, and there were more languages spoken within its boundaries than at any other point in history - and that's true even to this day.

Even the name, London, was coined by a foreigner. It's history is one of multiculturalism and immigration. It's the world's melting pot, and whatever sense of 'old London' people have simply isn't a fair reflection on the city itself. There has never been a point in its entire history, stretching back 2000 years, where there weren't immigrants dominating the landscape. It's the best thing about London. It's what every city on Earth will be like in a couple of hundred years.

People talk about there being some huge change in the ethnic composition of the city in ...what? The last twenty years? But they weren't around for the Viking invasions, or the subsequent Danish settlements in the eighth century. Or the Swedes in the ninth. Or the Irish in the thirteenth. Or the huguenots in the sixteenth. The european jews in the seventeenth. The chinese in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth. Or the west africans and caribbeans in the 1950s and 60s. There isn't a ten year period in the last two thousand years when London hasn't been infused with a new culture or a new set of immigrants. People talk of change as though it's something that happens to London, when in fact London itself is change, and always will be.
It's all very well to celebrate London's multicultural mix, and to be open to change, but there's no disguising the fact that London's previous waves of immigrants were small compared to it's total population. Recent decades have seen an unprecedented acceleration of immigration that has seen London change rapidly from a predominantly British city (albeit with substantial minorities) to one where the majority of inhabitants are of non-British descent. This is a profound change, and comes with both positive and negative aspects.
__________________
"Climb if you will, but remember that courage and strength are nought without prudence, and that a momentary negligence may destroy the happiness of a lifetime. Do nothing in haste; look well to each step; and from the beginning think what may be the end." Edward Whymper

JimB liked this post
Langur no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
development, england, london, united kingdom

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu