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Old February 22nd, 2015, 12:21 AM   #13121
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Kidbrooke Village | Kidbrooke SE3

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=670786

Official website: http://www.berkeleygroup.co.uk/prope...brooke-village



Project facts
  • Developer: Berkeley Group
  • Main architect: Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands
  • Cost: £1.1 billion ($1.8bn)
  • Homes: 6,000
  • Site area: 109 hectares

Revised plans for phase 3, to include 1,238 homes, have been submitted for approval. The planning application can be viewed here.







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Old February 22nd, 2015, 12:56 AM   #13122
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Great stuff.
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 03:23 AM   #13123
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I'd love to see a modern concert hall built near Canary Wharf. Alternatively, that ugly red brick monster at the end of Gerard Street could be knocked down.
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 03:23 AM   #13124
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Quote:
UK firms partner with Chinese contractors on London scheme



Two UK companies have joined forces with Chinese contractors to bid on a £400m project in central London, Construction News can reveal.

Interserve and Atkins have formed joint ventures with China State Construction Engineering Corporation 8 and 2, respectively, on Wanda One’s One Nine Elms scheme.

As Construction News revealed last December, both Chinese bidders were told they were required to partner with UK firms to bid for the lucrative deal.

CSCEC 2 and 8 are divisions of the state-owned China State Construction Engineering Corporation group but act autonomously and compete against each other for contracts.

The companies are among three that have been shortlisted on the project by Wanda One - a subsidiary of Chinese commercial property giant Dalian Wanda, which has assets valued at around £36bn and annual revenue of around £17bn.

The third contractor, Mace, has entered into an agreement with China Building Technique Group to bid for work. It is not confirmed whether the two firms would work together on One Nine Elms.

...
http://www.cnplus.co.uk/regional/lon...678604.article
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 04:29 AM   #13125
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That water feature in the Kidbrooke project, is that independent or part of the original brook?
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 04:49 AM   #13126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SomeKindOfBug View Post
The old Marble Arch tower is not the face of a city. You literally just described it as ubiquitous.
As it's ubiquitous, the tower doesn't detract from the Marble Arch scenery. The smart thing to do would have been renovating base facade (The Odeon) to coordinate better with it's low-rise neighbors.

Quote:
If anything, the city is improved by the new design, because for better or worse, it's unique, not ubiquitous.
It will be considered an eyesore for the area once it's completed, even to those who dislike the current tower. Hopefully it will have a lifespan of less than twenty years.
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 09:57 AM   #13127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hugh View Post
That water feature in the Kidbrooke project, is that independent or part of the original brook?
It's an artificial water feature.
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 10:00 AM   #13128
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One Blackfriars | South Bank SE1

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=400279

Official website: http://www.oneblackfriars.co.uk/



Project facts
  • Address: 1 Blackfriars Road, London SE1
  • Developer: St George
  • Architect: Ian Simpson Architects
  • Height: 163m
  • Floors: 52



Crane being assembled on site yesterday, photo by Potto:

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Old February 22nd, 2015, 12:13 PM   #13129
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Londonese View Post
I'd love to see a modern concert hall built near Canary Wharf. Alternatively, that ugly red brick monster at the end of Gerard Street could be knocked down.
Was going to suggest exactly this as well, a concert hall somewhere in or around the Canary Wharf area. Would prove a massive boost for its aspirations as a cultural destination.
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 03:42 PM   #13130
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Don't think the highrise at Kidbrooke village looks as good with a height reduction. Looks slightly out of proportion
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 05:11 PM   #13131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orange Alert! View Post
Was going to suggest exactly this as well, a concert hall somewhere in or around the Canary Wharf area. Would prove a massive boost for its aspirations as a cultural destination.
It's a possibility, but Rattle's (intended) orchestra is the LSO which has very strong ties with the City of London, so the pressure will be on to find a site within the Square Mile, or as close as possible at least.

I should also point out that this isn't actually news. The LSO have been making discreet enquiries along these lines for a few years now. The lack of headway made however is probably why the ante has been upped.

How about Bishopsgate Goods Yards?
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 11:27 PM   #13132
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Wood Wharf E14

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=317626

Official website: http://www.woodwharf.com/



Project facts
  • Developer: Canary Wharf Group
  • Cost: £2 billion ($3bn)
  • Homes: 3,100
  • Retail space: 2.57 million ft²
  • Public space: 8.9 acres





First piling rig on site at Wood Wharf. Photos by chest:



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Old February 22nd, 2015, 11:40 PM   #13133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SE9 View Post
It's an artificial water feature.
Cheers. Looks good.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 12:16 AM   #13134
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Pears Building | Hampstead NW3

London forum thread: N/A

Official website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/immunity-transplantation



Project facts
  • Address: Royal Free Hospital, Pond Street, London NW3
  • Developer: Royal Free and University College London
  • Architect: Hopkins Architects
  • Floors: 7
  • Floorspace: 9,620m²

Information and renders of the Pears Building, a medical research institute approved this week by Camden Council:

- Royal Free London: Plans for new research centre given the green light

- Ham & High: Camden Council grants planning permission for Royal Free research centre

- Evening Standard: World leading AIDS and cancer research centre in Hampstead gets green light






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Old February 23rd, 2015, 09:53 AM   #13135
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Ruskin Square | Croydon CR0

London forum thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=580546

Official website: http://www.ruskinsquare.com/



Project facts
  • Developer: Stanhope and Schroders
  • Architect: Shedkm
  • Cost: £500 million ($770m)
  • Homes: 625
  • Office space: 22,000m²





Progress at Ruskin Square, photo by Croydon Town:


Ruskin Square Croydon Feb 2015 by CroydonTown, on Flickr
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 10:00 AM   #13136
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Preserving the outside of a building while gutting within is making a travesty of the listing process

Facadism is nothing new. Almost a century ago Herbert Baker cheerfully demolished John Soane’s Bank of England but rebuilt his own massive version behind retained sections of his predecessor’s impregnable walls. But the sacrificial offering of a single remnant of an older building, usually a street elevation and never more than skin deep, has suddenly reached epidemic proportions, turbo-powered in London at least by escalating land values.

The agreement to retain a facade is, for the key players, a get out of jail card. It may come at the very end of a long wrangle but eventually the developers receive their planning permissions, prettily iced with listed building consents, the architects can relax and get on with the job (the demolition contractors and engineers having already done the trickiest bits) which leaves the marketing team and estate agents free to egg up the ‘heritage’ angle and clinch sales. Meanwhile the local activists have retired exhausted, or have moved on to ready themselves for the next battle of nerves. And – this is the trump card – all this means that the number of listed buildings saved from demolition appears to be continually rising.

In Liverpool, currently buoyed up on a wave of optimism and civic pride, its centre enjoying World Heritage Site status, the development of Heaps Rice Mill might have seemed to be an ideal opportunity to set residential, commercial or retail units within a handsome industrial complex in Liverpool 1. But the actual story is a fast-moving chain of actions all too familiar in the over-heated and mildly hysterical property market (‘buy a piece of East London Heritage,’ plead the hoardings around the former Queen Elizabeth Hospital for Children on the Hackney Road, though hardly a sliver will survive despite the sales pitch about homes ‘woven into’ the retained facade). At Heaps Rice Mill, destined to be a £130 million luxury residential development, only a last minute listing in the summer prevented total demolition. With the building’s Grade II designation in the bag, the local campaigners gained new confidence only to be met by the developers’ threat to withdraw entirely if they were forced to retain the entire building. And so, in November 2014, the local objectors were faced with harsh reality. Heaps Rice Mill had been ‘saved’, the developers got their square metres intact and as a result nothing of the mill would survive but a facade, a bit like a child’s sticking plaster with Dennis the Menace grimacing over the wound.

Such stories point to many human and systemic weaknesses: cynicism, flawed processes and, perhaps, a measure of naivety. How could a handsome group of Victorian warehouses, no distance north of the Pierhead, the Albert Docks and the city centre, be left unprotected, considered such an encumbrance that clearance would appear to be the only solution?

In London, a warehouse on Blossom Street within the enormous Norton Folgate redevelopment scheme on the fringes of the City awaits the same fate as its Liverpool counterpart, together with several other modest neighbours within the local conservation area. City centres everywhere in Britain are filling with fragmented buildings, little more than disconcerting, disconnected film sets. In Hull, the UK City of Culture 2017, the stone frontage of the former medical school has been pasted on to a bulky brick residential development, like a vintage luggage label on a new suitcase. The result is scarcely literate; neither acceptable architecture nor responsible conservation.

How could a handsome group of Victorian warehouses considered such an encumbrance that clearance would appear to be the only solution?
Such remnants have no structural integrity. They inevitably suggest the ‘feeble and lifeless forgery’ that William Morris warned against in his resounding 1877 Manifesto for the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings. Authenticity, the element that all intact buildings carry with them, something of their own time, of their making, born of wear and tear and even adaptation, can be argued and worried over but is always worth consideration.

When Ian Nairn roamed the land in the 1960s and 70s, furiously waging war on inert planners and incompetent local politicians, both in print and on TV, listed buildings were being summarily demolished for civic improvement or high fallutin engineering schemes, or just left to deteriorate. There appeared to be no alternative. Now it begins to look as if this rash of one-dimensional listed buildings has been conjured up by wilful misinterpretation of the very guidance devised and modified over the decades to protect and enhance the historic fabric.

When Westminster planners drew up their guidance for the Middlesex Hospital site off Goodge Street 10 years and a couple of financial crashes ago, they ensured that the chapel be retained, and popped Nassau Street and a single residential building (10 Mortimer Street) on to their shopping list. They survive, if adrift, on the perimeter of what became Fitzroy Place. At Bishopsgate Goods Yard, another immense development being assembled on the City fringe, the planners remind applicants that ‘historic continuity and recognition of a site’s past history are important components of creating a successful sense of place’. Planning briefs set the tone and planning guidance the context.

In 2013, the ways in which listed buildings were to be described changed quite fundamentally, to include more detail of the readily identifiable parts of a building. Equally, substandard elements can more easily be omitted; so, in theory at least, a listing can now apply to just the facade.

The facade business (strange spawn of the demolition trade) has its own rich literature, countless manuals and online information about how to support a fragile frontage on a forest of stanchions and props. The technology is developing fast, the expertise is sharpening up, but at least the more brazen structures of the mid 20th century – Brutalist buildings especially – still stand or fall, tout court. Where facadism is concerned, I take the William Morris line: better by far the best of the new than a travesty of the old. - Architect's Journal - continue reading here http://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/c...ontentID=11152
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 04:49 PM   #13137
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NEP Bridge | Nine Elms-Pimlico

London forum thread: N/A

Official website: http://www.nepbridgecompetition.co.uk/



Project facts
  • Developer: London Borough of Wandsworth
  • Jury Panel Chair: Graham Stirk of RSHP
  • Cost: £40m ($62m)

Design competition submissions for the Nine Elms-Pimlico Bridge have been released this afternoon. All 74 submissions can be viewed here.

- Architects Journal: Revealed: all 74 schemes vying for new Nine Elms bridge

- Evening Standard: First look at designs for elegant river crossing that could link Nine Elms with Pimlico

- Wandsworth Guardian: Stunning images reveal 74 competing designs for the new Nine Elms to Pimlico bridge
























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Old February 23rd, 2015, 05:04 PM   #13138
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I think I like the bottom one of the ones you posted the best.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 05:10 PM   #13139
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4th from bottom, bringing the Victoria Falls to London.
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 05:13 PM   #13140
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Wow this is one of the few rare cases where pretty much every project looks awesome (except for fourth one, which looks rather uninspired)
Second pic is intriguing though, as there is a stray horse chilling near the bike path
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