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Old August 18th, 2010, 04:03 AM   #1861
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Mayor Gives Guarded Approval To Conran Halls



The Mayor of London has given a guarded thumbs up to Conran and Partners plans for student housing on 61-63 Great Suffolk Street in the London borough of Southwark.

Developed by Q Developments and reaching ten storeys in height, the plans feature the demolition of a number of warehouses and the construction of 671 student beds, 2,230 square metres of commercial and retail space, plus fifteen disabled parking spaces and 362 cycle spaces. In addition the wonderfully named Grotto Podium Park will experience a number of improvements paid for by the developer to help advance public amenity.

The scheme features two blocks sitting on the site, one with a compact footprint in the western corner that rises ten storeys, and another one that stretches from west to east along the majority of the site with Pocock Street to its north although the architect has attempted to split it up into three separate visual sections thanks to the cladding treatment employed.

This second block has a standard roof line eight floors above the ground, although on top of this are three two storey pods that will have the penthouse apartments as these days rich students expect luxury living, even in halls. In between will be roof gardens.

The only two elements of the project that the Mayor of London's office doesn't support are the lack of a funding for Crossrail because as with all major developments they require a contribution, and secondly the developer has yet to show a specific university that is interested in the accommodation and would like its students there.

This is however a speculative student development, although securing a specific university, or alternatively bringing a university housing specialist like UNITE into play will resolve this problem, and also provide the developer with the confidence that what they have planned is a success so they can make the Crossrail contribution.

http://www.skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=2597
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Old August 21st, 2010, 02:11 AM   #1862
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The Wallbrook - finished

by LoveAgent.



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Old August 21st, 2010, 04:23 PM   #1863
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£50m price tag for Vauxhall penthouse in 'Knightsbridge of the South'


High life: features include a swimming pool and 360-degree views at a level 45 metres higher than the London Eye

It may be an unlikely “Knightsbridge of the South” but an address in Vauxhall is set to join London's premier properties with a £50million price tag.

The riverside triplex penthouse at the top of what will be Europe's tallest residential tower goes on the market on September 18 and is easily the most expensive property put up for sale south of the river.

The Tower, One St George Wharf is also believed to be the highest asking price outside the traditional “ultra-prime” streets of Mayfair, Kensington, Belgravia and Knightsbridge.

This latest example of a London “trophy home” comes after the Standard revealed that an apartment in the One Hyde Park scheme was being sold for £140 million.

Developer St George says the Vauxhall property's valuation is justified by the location on the Thames and its 360-degree views of the capital.

The penthouse will be 180 metres from the ground, 45 metres higher than the top of the London Eye, when it is finished in 2014.


Towering ambition: a model of the tower and, top, a computer image of its top floors

A spokeswoman for St George said: “There is a walkway all the way around the apartment and from that you could dive into the Thames, it is that close.

“You are never going to get that again as all the other towers are set back from the river. The new money coming into London have different views on where they want to live.

"They understand the importance of location but they also understand when something is a one-off and this is a one-off.”

The tower is on a sharp bend on the Thames which also means that the views take in more of the river.

Marketing material for the development stresses its central position rather than the address south of the river. It is described as lying “opposite Pimlico in London's rapidly evolving and culturally significant South Bank”.

Vauxhall was known for decades as a rundown area blighted by major roads and the railways emerging from Waterloo but is now being gentrified. It is sometimes referred to as VoHo because of its club scene, particularly serving the gay community.

Residents of the tower will have access to concierge services provided by an offshoot of Harrods and an infinity pool taking up all the ground floor.

Former Cabinet minister John Prescott approved the scheme, officially known as The Tower, One St George Wharf, five years ago against the advice of his inspector and design and heritage advisers.

It will contain 223 flats and was designed by architects Broadway Malyan, the firm originally behind the Shard of Glass at London Bridge Station before they were replaced by Renzo Piano.

St George recently sold a lower triplex penthouse in Battersea for £8 million.

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standa...f-the-south.do
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Old August 21st, 2010, 10:45 PM   #1864
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Work starts on Bankside’s 5-star Hilton hotel

Work is to start on the construction of a 5-star Hilton hotel on a site bounded by Great Suffolk Street, Price's Street and Bear Lane.

Splendid Hotels Group received planning permission two years ago to build a 196-room Holiday Inn hotel – aimed at the conference market – and a 134-room Staybridge Suites apart-hotel.

Since then the developer's plans have changed and the hotel will now be run under the Hilton brand.

The 8-storey building is designed by Dexter Moren, the same firm responsible for the nearby Travelodge London Southwark in Union Street.

Since permission was granted the site has remained vacant although it has frequently been used as a base for film units.

Recently signs appeared on the walls around the site announcing that work is to start on the construction of the Hllton Bankside hotel.

According to the architects' website, the Hilton will have 280 rooms and will be Tate Modern's closest 5-star hotel.

Last month Southwark Council gave the go-ahead for a 128-room Premier Inn just a few yards away at the corner of Great Suffolk Street and Lavington Street. An 'affordable luxury' citizenM hotel is also planned for the other end of Lavington Street.

Work is also due to start this summer on two new hotels in Blackfriars Road with a total of 477 rooms.







http://www.london-se1.co.uk/news/vie...ws+for+Twitter
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Old August 23rd, 2010, 04:04 PM   #1865
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A Look At Wood Wharfs Tallest.

Published on 23-08-2010 by Skyscrapernews.com


Leading architecture firm Pelli Clarke Pelli has penned a new skyscraper and low-rise podium to stand on plots W02 and W03 of Wood Wharf in east London by combining them into one monster development.



It's been designed as one of the two projects that will start the sprawling Wood Wharf masterplan. The scheme is a joint venture between British Waterways and the Canary Wharf Group who have seen it as an ideal way to further extend the Canary Wharf estate past its existing boundaries in a contiguous manner and as a result will stand on the western edge of the 20 acre development area.

With 37 storeys, the project has been masterplanned to have an approximate height of 181.5 metres making it the tallest building in Wood Wharf with the tower element orientated to the western side of the site and the podium, which will contain four trading floors, stepping down towards the planned urban park that the area will have. It will also be the largest building in Wood Wharf with 158,000 square metres of office space on offer - almost as much as the largest towers in Canary Wharf.

Bearing in mind the architectural conservativism of the existing Canary Wharf estate Pelli Clarke Pelli has designed the project to have a flat roof whilst the bulk of the building is reduced from indented corners, a trick they also used on other towers they have designed for the area such as One Canada Square and Cititgroup's European headquarters.

This time however, some depth is added through a perforated glass screen that clads the towers walls, projects past the indented corners and overruns the top of the building concealing its crown in the process. To help with solar shading the glazing will be frittered whilst adjustable louvres will be placed around the building depending on the necessary shading required for each area.

This will also be the first building in Canary Wharf to incorporate solar panels into its facades with the south and eastern faces of the building set to have them fitted much in the same way as KPF designed Heron Tower in the City of London. Whereas other Canary Wharf office blocks have had utilitarian roof areas with plant machine and so-on on them, here 65% of the roofs will be green with the plan being to open them up to the buildings occupiers when possible.

link: http://www.skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=2621
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Old August 24th, 2010, 10:39 PM   #1866
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This Wood Wharf project looks very promising. Sure, not the most daring architecture but it blends well into Canary Wharf, it's CW style so it's naturally more boxy.
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Old August 25th, 2010, 03:30 AM   #1867
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Blackfriars mainline station to shut for upgrade



Blackfriars mainline station is to close for two months as part of the £5.5bn Thameslink project.

A new station, which will be the first to span the Thames, is being built as part of the Bedford to Brighton line upgrade.

Construction of the upper concourse has finished and the closure in November will allow work to switch from the west side to the east side of the bridge.

Blackfriars Tube station closed for two years in March 2009 under the project.

The completion of the upper station concourse paves the way for the track "switch" at Christmas.

Longer trains

This will involve work on the the tracks moving from the western side of the bridge to the eastern side - creating the final track alignment for the redeveloped station.

Trains will continue to run through the station for the majority of the closure - from 20 November until 17 January - and passengers will be able to use the nearby City Thameslink station.

Work to extend platforms to accommodate 50% longer trains on the line has been completed at St Albans, Luton Airport Parkway and Mill Hill Broadway.

In total 12 stations will undergo work to extend platforms and the first 12-carriage trains are due to begin running in December 2011.

The redeveloped Blackfriars station, which will have an entrance on the South Bank, is due to open in spring 2012.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-11069021
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Old August 25th, 2010, 04:37 PM   #1868
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More renders of the station:

[IMG]http://i36.************/6e174i.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i38.************/2lbmkra.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i35.************/6qh5br.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i34.************/egvnuq.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i35.************/28vg16u.jpg[/IMG]
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Old August 26th, 2010, 12:04 AM   #1869
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Westminster Approves BFLS Regent Street Plans



The City of Westminster has approved the latest plans by BFLS for the regeneration of one of the buildings that is part of the prime London shopping fare of Regent Street called Marcol House.

The project involves the retention of the grade 2 listed Portland stone façade that directly overlooks Regent Street allowing a new build to be constructed with a mansard roof rising above it, and the demolition of what is behind it, namely 33 Maragret Street which will be replaced by something more modern.

It's the back part of the site that has been designed to have a more architecturally up to date look with stone cladding on the external walls to help it blend in with the retained façade. It will contain vertical triple height openings which will contain the floor to ceiling glazing with the mansard roof above the stone parapet with metal-façed panels and double height strips of glass that maintain the vertical rythmn of the lower floors.

On the western side of the block however, the mansard roof is replaced by a sloping double-level roof terrace that helps preserve the rights of light with next door rather than completely overshadow it, whilst on top of the building will be a green roof.

At 32 metres in height, the scheme is massed to fit in with its neighbours and if built will contain 13,398 square metres of office space, 191 square metres of ground floor retail as one would expect for such a prime location, plus a residential element of 23 apartments at 23-24 Newman Street.

The developer of the project is Great Portland Estates, one of London's largest corporate landowners.

http://www.skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=2612
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Old August 26th, 2010, 02:29 AM   #1870
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nice pics
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Old August 26th, 2010, 02:34 AM   #1871
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amazing projects
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Old August 26th, 2010, 11:07 PM   #1872
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Are there any other railway stations in the world directly on top of a river?
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Old August 27th, 2010, 06:49 AM   #1873
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrow + London View Post
Are there any other railway stations in the world directly on top of a river?
Zürich central station comes to mind. It's in front of the main river, but completely crosses another behind.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...16512&t=h&z=17
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Old August 27th, 2010, 07:40 PM   #1874
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I find these kind of stations very attractive, it's a way of maximizing bridges.
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Old August 27th, 2010, 08:22 PM   #1875
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Peter Rees: The man who built the City of London



As Peter Rees marks 25 years as the City of London’s chief planning officer BD meets the man and gauges to what ends he has used his considerable power.

The idea that BD might run a profile of the City of London’s chief planning officer on the occasion of his 25th anniversary in the post may be a very good one but it wasn’t ours. It was Peter Rees’s own office that approached us – along with a number of property magazines and even national newspapers – with the proposal. I am glad that they did.

I had not met Rees before but during the couple of hours that we spent talking – first in his office at the Guildhall and then while touring some of the major developments he has overseen – he more than lived up to his reputation for charisma, frankness and a keen sense of what makes a good quote. And yet the question of why he wanted all this publicity never quite got answered. After our meeting I spoke to architects, developers and planning consultants who had had dealings with this pivotal figure in London’s recent development. Inevitably, some were critical – although, equally inevitably, they weren’t keen to speak on the record – but even one of his considerable number of fans said that he “wasn’t surprised to hear that Peter might want to commission his own hagiography”. If that was his ambition, it is one with which I can at least sympathise.

In a country where planners rarely identify their role as anything more purposeful than that of development controller, Rees has been a genuine maverick. Almost uniquely he sees his task as one of design – a perception that is doubtless related to the fact that he began his career as an architect – and has proved spectacularly successful in promoting a particular vision of the City’s development and persuading others to adopt it.

He puts the number of cases in which the City’s planning committee has chosen to disregard his recommendations at “less than one per cent” – an astounding show of confidence in his judgement given the scale of the change that has taken place during his tenure.

Like it or not, the City of London is one of 21st century Britain’s most remarkable built environments. It is not without justification that Rees might claim to be its author.

New expectations

The then 37-year-old Rees was appointed in 1985, at a time when, as he puts it: “The image of the City was that of a throng of commuters trudging to work across London Bridge, many of them still in bowler hats. Dining options were extremely limited but then most bankers’ lunches didn’t involve anything solid.”

With the significant exception of the under-construction Lloyd’s building, architectural ambitions were low, most commissions being handed out to one of half-a-dozen large commercial firms, the least dismal of which was Seifert.

All of this, however, was soon to be swept away by the deregulation of financial services that took place the following year. Whereas previously only British-owned companies had been allowed to undertake stock dealing and banking transactions, now German, American, French, Swiss and Japanese banks were able to establish themselves in the UK. They brought with them new expectations, not least about the kind of buildings they were prepared to occupy.

The Broadgate development was emblematic of the change. Deregulation had removed the need for banks to be close to the Bank of England, with the effect that peripheral sites – Broadgate straddles the City/Hackney boundary – were suddenly transformed into major development opportunities. For it to attract the best tenants, however, Broadgate’s developers recognised that it would need to provide a very different environment from that on offer in the historic City core. They drafted in Arup Associates and subsequently SOM to create a model corporate campus, replete with leisure and retail uses, high-quality public spaces and architecture of a slickly post-Miesian stripe. It was a sea-change project, transforming developers’ understanding of the commercial advantages that might ensue from investment in architecture.

Glazed over

Rees has a criticism of Broadgate today, it is of its architecture’s internationalism. “There are parts by SOM,” he says “that you can find in Canary Wharf, in Boston, in Chicago – almost exactly the same building.”

That kind of creative recycling clearly didn’t get past him for long. “There’s only one tool of development control that really works – and which I possess – and that is a low threshold for boredom,” he says, not without glee. “Developers quickly discovered that if they brought in the same old thing by the same old people I glazed over and lost interest.”

The nineties duly saw a considerable expansion of the range of practices working in the City, among them firms of the calibre of Foster, Parry and MacCormac Jamieson Prichard.

One suspects that Rees’s low threshold of boredom may have a lot to do with his reasons for abandoning a career in architecture. Nonetheless, he clearly enjoys the opportunity that his job affords him to establish collaborative relationships with architects. “I say to the developer: come to see us at the back-of-the-envelope stage. But don’t draw on the envelope.

ome in with a blank envelope. Bring us in at the briefing stage with your architect and from then on let us work as part of the team.”

He applauds Eric Parry, perhaps the architect who has built the most impressive body of work in the City during the Rees era, as “a good team player” but clearly that description doesn’t fit them all. He recalls visiting James Stirling in his office – “He wouldn’t come to my office!” – to ask that the roofscape of No 1 Poultry be lent greater animation. Returning two weeks later he was presented with a flat model depicting a design for a rooftop garden and restaurant. Rees asked to see what it looked like in relation to the rest of the building, to which Stirling snapped: “That’s nothing to do with you! I am the architect.”

That complaint – that Rees’s involvement can prove more collaborative than the architects involved might wish for – is one I have heard reiterated elsewhere. I ask if he throws in his own design ideas. “It’s the architect’s job to design it, not mine,” he replies. “The best a planner can do, if an architect’s heart isn’t in it, is to make mediocrity out of awfulness. We have redesigned one or two buildings to achieve mediocrity. But that’s a last resort.”

And yet on our walk later in the morning we pass Foster & Partners’ One Gresham Street – a building that he clearly deems a success – where he tells me how the stone corners of this steel-framed building were his idea. “You could say that’s a design involvement,” he admits. “But if the architect hadn’t believed in it, it wouldn’t have come out right… It’s tested by the architect.”

Rees appears fundamentally opposed to any legislation that might prevent him maintaining this kind of one-on-one working dialogue with architects. One of the first decisions he made on taking up his post was to abandon the use of plot ratios so that all proposals had to be judged in relation to (necessarily more subjective) townscape criteria.

“New York finds it very difficult to get inspiring architecture in commercial buildings,” he says. “The reason is they have a building code based on rules. You have buildings to which you are entitled so why bother to do something different and argue your way through their commissions for years? What happens is you build the standard code building. In London you have to first of all cope with my threshold of boredom.”

Well, if codes are too blunt an instrument, I ask, is there not then all the more need for planners to start planning again – to make physical propositions about the city to which architects can respond? Wrong again.

“In Berlin,” he shudders, “you are not allowed to do a building until the planners have designed a masterplan. The architect just puts a suit of clothes around it.

In this country it’s all to play for, which encourages ingenuity and creates more of a challenge.”

Masterpiece in waiting

No building better exemplifies Rees’s reasons for wanting to maintain that empirical way of working than the new Rothschild Bank headquarters now being constructed at the heart of the City’s most important conservation area to designs by Rem Koolhaas. Rothschild’s has occupied the site since 1809, rebuilding its accommodation twice already. This time, however, it required a very considerable expansion in floor area – where its previous headquarters was six storeys in height, the new one rises to 16.

Rees advised that the only way he could sell such a proposal to the planning committee was if Rothschild’s commissioned a building of extraordinary architectural distinction. Rem Koolhaas’ Office of Metropolitan Architecture was duly commissioned, producing a design that – whatever its merits – would clearly never have emerged if codes or a masterplan had been in place.

The committee did accept it but by a narrow majority – 13 votes to nine – and only after Rees had assured them that it was a masterpiece in the making. It was one of the biggest tests of his authority to date. “It wasn’t an easy ask,” he accepts. “But if somebody has managed to persuade the oldest family bank now left in the City to go to an ultra-modern architect who used to be an enfant terrible – he’s no longer enfant but he’s still kind of shocking – and get him to design their building, it would be a very strange planning authority that turned around and said ’I’m sorry, we don’t like it’.”

Rees does, of course, have overarching formal ambitions for the City – notably the cultivation of a cluster of tall buildings around Tower 42 – but he is profoundly resistant to the suggestion that there might be value in steering separate developments towards any kind of common architectural language. He cites the two years he spent working for Gordon Cullen in the early seventies as formative and it is not hard to see the influence of Cullen’s picturesque sensibilities on the city that Rees has made. Variety, contrast and incident are privileged over formal cohesion at every turn.

On our walk we stop on Wood Street, where he points out major buildings by Farrell, Foster, Rogers and Parry, the latter two of which were both Stirling Prize nominees. But isn’t it, I ask, all a bit of a mess? “The cohesion of the place is the space. It isn’t the buildings. The architecture will come and go,” he says. “I hate Paris except for the bits that Haussmann never got hold of. When I go to Paris I don’t want to go to the Champs-Élysées and the great squares. I want to go round the back to the bits that got missed out. That’s where the life is. That’s where the interest is.”

Failure of imagination

Given the extent to which London is the product of a determined reluctance to impose large-scale urban strategies, it is a view that demands to be taken seriously. However, as we walk out to the environs of St Paul’s Cathedral, one is made starkly aware of its limitations. To the north of the cathedral lies the William Whitfield-planned Paternoster Square, an ensemble of freestanding masonry buildings of contained footprint, varied authorship and essentially classical bearing. To the east stands Jean Nouvel’s soon-to-be-completed One New Change: an amorphous, fully glazed volume that occupies the entirety of its urban block. The schemes’ expressions are, to all intents and purposes, diametrically opposed and yet Rees steered both towards planning approval.

It is hard not to feel that his unwillingness to demand any relationship between them represents a failure of urban imagination.

What a heroically impossible figure Peter Rees is. He is a planner who evidently harbours a profound suspicion of large-scale planning and yet is intent on micro-managing the design of every project that comes before him. He operates, in other words, a tyranny of subjectivity to which anyone hoping to build on his patch soon discovers they had better submit. That is an expensive process for developers and frequently a creatively bruising one for architects but, no doubt, it produces a kind of result. No-one can deny that Rees has presided over a very dramatic improvement in the quality of the City’s architecture.

I can’t help wondering, however, what other country in the developed world operates a planning system that would allow a figure like Rees to accrue such power. On the face of it his position here is a conflicted one: he is a highly proactive individual operating within a fundamentally reactive system. And yet it is surely the very absence of propositional urban thinking that characterises the UK’s moribund planning sector that has allowed him to operate with such autonomy. “The British don’t like planning and in a way I’ve always been happy to work with that,” he acknowledges.

The City of London may well represent the best that our planning system can deliver but, for all Rees’s protestations of their tedium, I suspect New York, Berlin and Paris have rather a lot to teach us yet.

http://www.bdonline.co.uk/culture/pe...004626.article
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Old August 27th, 2010, 11:49 PM   #1876
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South London almshouses could boost construction recruitment

A new set of almshouses is set to be built in south London after the project received council approval, which could bolster local construction recruitment.

Lewisham council has granted permission for construction work to proceed on 62 one and two-bedroom almshouses in Belmont Park on behalf of the Merchant Taylors' Company.

These homes have been especially designed for older people, with easy wheelchair access and more living space, while a further 26 maisonettes and apartments are being built for private sale on an adjacent site, which could also help to create new jobs in construction.

Matthew Dear, charities officer for the Merchant Taylors' Company, commented: "This decision represents an exciting opportunity for the charity to serve current and future generations of older Lewisham residents with the very best and most appropriate affordable housing."

This is one of a number of construction jobs scheduled for Lewisham, with developer Costain also recently signing an agreement to carry out the £28.6 million redevelopment of Deptford Green School.

http://news.careerstructure.com/arti...n-recruitment/
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Old August 28th, 2010, 02:38 AM   #1877
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The Pinnacle

by mattomatto.

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Old August 28th, 2010, 02:45 AM   #1878
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The Pinnacle

by lumberjack.

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Old August 31st, 2010, 05:15 PM   #1879
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20 Fenchurch Street

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Old August 31st, 2010, 10:18 PM   #1880
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Real IS acquires 80,000 sq ft of office space

Asset manager Real IS has completed a deal to buy 80,000 sq ft of London office space.

The company will pay £52 million for 21 Bloomsbury Street in the West End, according to Property Week.

Real IS, a division of BayernLB, inherits the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions as a tenant until 2022.

Andreas Heibrock of Real IS said: “We are pursuing the fund’s underlying strategy by selecting a property in a prime location and a tenant with an excellent credit standing.”

News of the deal comes days after Evans Randall acquired Drapers Gardens in the City of London for £242.5 million.

The investment banking and private equity firm bought the building from a joint venture which comprised Real Estate Funds and the Canary Wharf Group.

An unspecified proportion of the financing for the deal was provided by Eurohyop - a German real estate loans company.

http://www.officialspace.co.uk/news/...-office-space/
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