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Old February 15th, 2006, 01:00 AM   #21
lakerdar123
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nice update
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Old February 15th, 2006, 10:20 AM   #22
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I will have two days of frantic work. Then, I may have some contributions too.

What is miraculous about New Rome - Konstantinople - Istanbul from a purely historical standpoint and not emotionalisms attached, is the historical continuity and subsequent variability of its historic background. This city has a dazzling diversity of architectural styles embedded in its core and because it has been an imperial city for such a long time, longer than any other big European city - it has an immence number of treasures from all historical periods.

This diversity of its character makes it unique in essence. And thanks to Asim for displaying this uniqueness.
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Old February 15th, 2006, 01:12 PM   #23
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Gregory my dear brother, next time you'll come to Istanbul, Kerem and I will show you around the less touristic side streets which cover many hidden treasures.

It's a pity that most tourists only see the main square monuments (like Haghia Sophia, Blue Mosque, Topkapi Palace, etc.) whereas the side streets have many hidden treasures from the late Roman and early/middle Byzantine period.

Even most tour guides don't know these places (only historians, archaeologists and amateur history buffs know them)

For instance, the Sphendone (curved tribune of the Hippodrome) was hidden for centuries behind houses. They recently demolished these houses and an "immensely huge" structure came to light ( when you first see the Sphendone in front of you while walking from the street near Marmara Sea, you become like this: )

It's as if a "Colosseum/Circus Maximus" was hidden there for centuries (literally)

The Sphendone is so huge that there's no way it can fit into a single photo frame (you need to use a tripod and take several shots and make a long panorama connecting these photos with Photoshop)

If I can make it one day (I'm planning to go to the roof of one of the hotels in the area and take panorama shots of the Sphendone with a tripod) I'm sure anyone who'll see the photo will be like this:

But of course, it's always more impressive to see it with your own eyes.

( We are waiting for your return )
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Old February 15th, 2006, 01:17 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joya
This is how the hippodrome and the great palace looked like from the Marmara sea at that time

Hippodrome (left), the Great Palace (middle) and St. Sophia (right)



Look at St. Sophia (a huge building) and understand the size of the Hippodrome
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Old February 15th, 2006, 01:38 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ASIMOV
It's a pity that most tourists only see the main square monuments (like Haghia Sophia, Blue Mosque, Topkapi Palace, etc.) whereas the side streets have many hidden treasures from the late Roman and early/middle Byzantine period.
Even most tour guides don't know these places (only historians, archaeologists and amateur history buffs know them)

agree
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Old February 15th, 2006, 02:27 PM   #26
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Floor mosaics of the Great Palace























Frescoes on the walls



Late Roman statue inside the Great Palace



An earlier Roman statue head



A long corridor with arches and vaults (seen in the background)



The Great Palace, built by Roman emperor Constantine The Great, is so huge that it will take many years to complete the restoration works and open it for the visit of tourists (right now you can only see the floor mosaics)

Last edited by ASIMOV; March 7th, 2006 at 07:00 AM.
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Old February 15th, 2006, 03:29 PM   #27
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New York Times article published when the most important sections of The Great Palace were discovered in 1998

Is This the Secret Heart of the Byzantine Empire?

By STEPHEN KINZER. New York Times, Monday, July 27, 1998

Nearly a thousand years after it was lost to history, Turkish archeologists have apparently found ruins of the Great Palace from which Byzantine emperors ruled much of the known world.

The archeologists were cleaning an underground Ottoman chamber one day in April when they noticed a narrow corridor filled with dirt and debris. Crawling through it with mounting excitement they quickly realized that they were looking not at Ottoman ruins but at something much older.

''It is wonderful, one of the most important finds in many years,'' Erendiz Ozbayoglu, a professor of classical languages at Istanbul University, said last week. ''We knew the palace existed, and we have hundreds of books and manuscripts describing it. Now, after all this time, we are actually going to be able to see it. It's very, very exciting.''

Archeologists involved in the excavation are not certain which part of the sprawling palace complex they have uncovered, but believe that one room they found may have served as a library or archive. Its arching wall is decorated with floral and geometric patterns. A thousand years have not dimmed the vivid green, yellow and red pigment.

The palace may become a major tourist attraction when it is fully excavated, but that is likely to take several years.

''What we have found is most probably the Great Palace,'' said Alpay Pasinli, director of the Istanbul Archeological Museum, who is overseeing the excavation.

''When we reached the room with the fresco, we stared at it for a long time,'' he said. ''To see something that no one has laid eyes on for so many centuries is quite an emotional experience.''

Constantine the Great built the core of the Great Palace after he made this city the capital of the Roman Empire in A.D. 330, and work continued intermittently for eight centuries. The palace was home to more than 50 Byzantine emperors and the stage for countless intrigues, some of which decided the fate of nations. It was filled with wondrous furnishings, among them a tree of gilded bronze and matching gilded lions equipped with machines that enabled them to roar and beat the ground with their tails.

''The throne itself was so contrived that at one moment it stood low on the ground and the next moment it would suddenly be raised high in the air,'' an Italian Ambassador reported in 949.

Constantinople, built on top of the ancient Greek city Byzantium, was devastated by fires in the 12th century and then plundered by Crusaders in 1204. Later, after it was captured by the Ottoman Turks, a new palace called Topkapi was built.

The newly discovered ruins are just outside the Topkapi walls and across the street from the majestic Hagia Sophia, which for centuries was the largest and most important church in Christendom, but after 1453 a mosque and now a museum.

A dozen stone steps lead down to the excavation. The corridor leading to the newly discovered rooms is about 4 feet wide and 100 feet long. Halfway down its length, delicate red bricks typical of the Ottoman period give way to the large marble blocks and swirling masonry patterns associated with Byzantine architecture.
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Old February 15th, 2006, 03:36 PM   #28
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These two images belong to the section discovered in 1998



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Old February 15th, 2006, 04:17 PM   #29
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The Great Palace (front) and the Hippodrome (back)



The Great Palace



Daphne





Daphne courtyard and Octagon



Onopus and Augusteus



Onopus



Zeuxippos





Passage to the Kathisma (Emperor's Loge) at the Hippodrome (the Hippodrome was connected to the Great Palace through this passage which could be accessed only by the emperor)



Passage to the Kathisma and St. Stephen Church



The Kathisma (Emperor's Loge) inside the Hippodrome



Referee's Loge (across the Kathisma)

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Old February 15th, 2006, 05:36 PM   #30
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wonderful moisaics!!
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Old February 15th, 2006, 05:51 PM   #31
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wwawww really good fantastic!
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Old February 16th, 2006, 04:07 AM   #32
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Sweet renders! I'm a really big fan of Constantinople and the Byzantine Empire.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 02:54 PM   #33
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The Great Palace (324-337) and the Hippodrome (196-330)



Works on the floor mosaics of the Great Palace were started during the reign of Constantinus I (306-337) and were completed during the reign of Justinianus I (527-565)






























Last edited by ASIMOV; February 28th, 2006 at 12:07 AM.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 03:25 PM   #34
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the moisaic detail's are stuning

Last edited by Arpels; February 27th, 2006 at 04:07 PM.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 04:05 PM   #35
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Fantastic thread
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Old February 27th, 2006, 11:24 PM   #36
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Wonderful city.
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Old February 28th, 2006, 12:42 AM   #37
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Google Earth coordinates for the two surviving sections of the Great Palace

1) The larger section near Haghia Sophia

41.0071829108, 28.9809565176

2) The smaller section near the Hippodrome and Blue Mosque, called the Magnaura

41.0039707752, 28.9785979259
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Old March 4th, 2006, 03:49 AM   #38
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Old March 7th, 2006, 01:02 AM   #39
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very nice !

Is there a high quality model or rendering of how the whole city looked like ?
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Old March 7th, 2006, 06:54 AM   #40
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Fresh new images taken by Kerem this weekend:

View of the Magnaura Tower of the Great Palace (the main buildings of the palace are still completely sealed from public access due to continuing archaeological works)





Walls dividing the rooms of the substructure (photos taken from above the wall that separates the archaeological site from Four Seasons Hotel)









These narrow angle shots from above the separating wall are all that you can see inside the huge archaeological site which is otherwise forbidden area (Kerem couldn't even see the pictures that he was taking: he lifted his arms above the separating wall and pressed on the camera's button)

And these are the first ever pictures of the archaeological site on the internet.

Thanks Kerem

Last edited by ASIMOV; March 7th, 2006 at 07:06 AM.
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