daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 2nd, 2007, 10:39 PM   #321
LordBaltimore
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 8
Likes (Received): 0



Who cares about this building? Not me. Bulldoze it and build the tower.


Clash over historic city building looms
Protected Guilford Ave. warehouse could be razed for 60-story tower in mixed-use project



By Jill Rosen
Sun reporter

January 2, 2007

A development plan that includes a tower to rival the city's tallest skyscrapers could mean the demolition of yet another vestige of downtown's historic architecture.

Setting up what would be downtown Baltimore's third preservation face-off in less than a year, a Washington-area development team is in early talks with the city about building a mixed-use project near the end of the Jones Falls Expressway, including a tower that could rise as high as 60 stories.

To make that happen, the developers would need to raze the Terminal Warehouse, an unimposing brick edifice that has stood on the Guilford Avenue site since 1894 - and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1975.

The previous two clashes of development versus preservation were over the 100-year-old Rochambeau apartment building, which the Archdiocese Of Baltimore demolished last fall, and several 1820s rowhouses on St. Paul Place, which Mercy Medical Center is fighting to raze. Like them, the Terminal Warehouse is on the city's books as protected property with historic relevance.

The archdiocese waited the legally required time for city officials to consider the Rochambeau demolition. But at Mercy's request, City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. sponsored a bill, passed quietly last fall, that had the 1820s homes - some of the oldest downtown - removed from the protected list to expedite the hospital's expansion plans.

"It's very disturbing to hear that yet another notable property [the Terminal Warehouse] ... is being threatened," said John Maclay, a past president of Baltimore Heritage. "We did what we were supposed to do. We got [these buildings] on those lists, and it's a shock that [they're] being questioned."

The developers, RWN Development and Bresler & Reiner, have applied for a permit to demolish the warehouse. Because of the building's protected status, the application process requires a one-year waiting period, which began days ago.

The developers - who own almost the entire 300 block of Guilford Avenue - have an ambitious, two-phase plan in mind for the site, which includes the former Hammerjacks nightclub.

First, said John Ginnever, RWN's executive vice president, they would like to demolish the Hammerjacks building and the garage immediately south of it to begin building a nine-story parking garage with retail at the ground level.

Because those buildings aren't protected, the developers need no special permission to move along with that phase of their plan.

If in a year they get permission from Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano to raze the Terminal Warehouse, now known as Fort Knox Self Storage, that's where they'd like to build the tower that could rise 60 stories.

In September, a Philadelphia developer announced his intentions to build a skyscraper downtown on the site of the former McCormick & Co. spice plant. At 59 stories, it was advertised as having the potential to be Baltimore's tallest.

RWN and its partners haven't decided what exactly they'd like their tower to be - alternatives from apartments to condominiums to a hotel to an assisted-living facility are on the table, Ginnever said, adding that "it depends on where the market leads us." Regardless, there would be more room for retail on the first floor.

"It's hard to find this large of a footprint in the city anymore," the developer said. "We believe we can do a very significant project."

The developers, who also own the Saratoga Court apartments on the south side of the block, plan to refurbish that building, also with ground-floor retail - all in hopes of getting more life on what's a barren stretch of road that fronts the raised highway's desolate underbelly.

"We believe that area is going to liven up in a few years," Ginnever said. "It will be a completely different neighborhood."

Ginnever said his team is fully aware of the controversy surrounding Mercy's rowhouses, which sit just a few blocks west of their Guilford Avenue site, and is trying to be "very sensitive" to preservation issues. They have not ruled out trying to save at least something of the Terminal Warehouse facade.

"We're not trying to demolish the building tomorrow," he said. "We're looking at our options, and we're open to all options and ideas for the site."

Acting Planning Director Gary Cole said the plans, though only in the conceptual stage, sound promising.

"With respect to where the city would like to go, of course we want to increase the residential development within downtown Baltimore. The similar could be said with respect to retail," he said. "The real important thing to the city is that there is still a good deal of interest in developing in downtown."

As for the potential demolition of a protected city building, Cole said his staff hasn't "had time to really delve into it at this point."

But, he added, "We will handle it in a manner that, hopefully, is not as contentious as the Mercy hospital site."

Designed by Baltimore architect Benjamin B. Owens, the Terminal Warehouse's most distinctive feature is the 30,000-gallon water tower with a turret-like top that caps its roof.

Created as a depot for flour coming by train into Baltimore from the west, in its early years it also was used to store sugar, peas, beans, clover seed, wool and barbed wire, according to the site's National Register application.

It referred to the water tower as "a permanent landmark in the central city."

"The preservation of this block is important," the application read, "not only because of the fine example of a turn of the century warehouse and related industrial technology but also because it is in proximity to architecturally outstanding structures throughout the municipal center."

After a hard-fought battle to save the Rochambeau last fall that went to the state's highest court, Baltimore Heritage and others are now trying to appeal the city's demolition permit for the Mercy rowhouses. A hearing is set for Friday.

Preservationists were dismayed to learn that they could soon be facing another challenge.

"Holy cow," said Johns Hopkins, executive director of Baltimore Heritage. "Here we have yet another notable property in the historic district whose owners intend to tear it down."
LordBaltimore no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 8th, 2007, 09:42 PM   #322
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

yeah...that rat hole needs to go. Seriously. Some of these preservationists are out of touch.
waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2007, 10:15 PM   #323
jason111
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 38
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by waj0527 View Post
yeah...that rat hole needs to go. Seriously. Some of these preservationists are out of touch.
I agree as well we need more skyscrapers in this city.
jason111 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 18th, 2007, 09:25 PM   #324
jason111
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 38
Likes (Received): 0

Hi does anyone know any updates on 10IH?
jason111 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 22nd, 2007, 06:22 PM   #325
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

Im probably not the best person to answer this question b/c I havent contacted the developer personally, but someone reported on the board that the company is still very committed. They've already poured in hundreds of thousands in approvals and design work, etc. Hell, they've already bought the land.

Last I heard they were planning to make the tower an even 60 stories and 700 ft. tall or so. They havent released any new design, but I think the new one will include a crown. Here's an old rendering as a reference:

waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 25th, 2007, 06:06 PM   #326
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

Lofty dreams for Railway building
JEN DEGREGORIO
Daily Record Business Writer

January 24, 2007 6:13 PM

After years of planning, developers have finally begun renovating Baltimore’s historic Railway Express building, a mixed-use project observers say will connect downtown with a burgeoning arts district just up the street. The 77,000-square-foot structure was built in 1929 as a mail depot for parcels arriving by train from Penn Station, which sits directly across Saint Paul Street from the former the U.S. Parcel Post Station. Baltimore City later bought the facility and used it as a warehouse until 2003 before selling it the next year to a team of developers called Railway Express LLC.

In a matter of days, the company will begin an $11 million conversion of the facility into 30 loft-style apartments with 32,000 square feet of commercial space. But some minor, interior construction has already begun, said Martin P. Azola, a partner in Railway Express LLC. “We’re off and running finally,” he said. “It’s a handsome structure, and when we’re done with it, it will very much complement the train station.”

Renovations of the concrete-and-brick revival-style building could be complete by mid-summer of this year. Commercial tenants have already signed onto the project, including Harrison Development LLC, Doracon LLC and Case[werks] LLC, a custom display case-maker relocating from North Charles Street. A coffee shop is also in the works.

The project experienced a number of false starts over the years, said Azola, whose partners include Ronald Lipscomb, Edward Hord, Kenneth Banks, Michael Novak and Anthony Ambridge. At one point, the team had planned to use the structure for mainly commercial purposes but had to rethink the project when its major tenant, Carton Donofrio Partners, backed out of a deal. “It was a real body blow at the time,” Azola said. “The Baltimore City commercial office market took a real nosedive around the same time.”

The company then briefly considered turning the structure into an academy for a program the Baltimore school system was contemplating but never realized. The team ultimately decided on a mixed-use project after witnessing new investments north of Penn Station. The city recently branded the area Station North Arts and Entertainment District, taking its name from an artists’ community that had flocked there to take advantage of cheap housing and abundant warehouse space.

“Three or four years ago this area was nothing but a big, vast wasteland,” Azola said. “But there are new things going on.”

Construction is nearly complete on 32 new townhouses on the 1700 block of North Calvert Street. The 1700 block of North Charles Street, meanwhile, has a thriving independent movie theater, The Charles, as well as the recently expanded eatery Sofi’s Crepes and the Everyman Theatre. The city has also chosen developers for an urban renewal project that would rehabilitate the abandoned Chesapeake Restaurant and adjacent property on North Charles Street.

“I do think it’s a real bridge between what’s happening in Mount Vernon and what’s happening on the proverbial ‘other side of the tracks,’” Stewart Watson, a sculptor who lives in Station North, said of the Railways Express building renovation. Azola expects the building to appeal to residents who want easy access to the train station. The proximity has already lured at least one commercial tenant.

“Our clientele comes from all over the Northeast corridor,” said Matt Malaquias, co-owner of Case[werks], which provides display furnishings for museums, universities and other users. “We like the fact that it’s in the Station North Arts District; we are a company that serves the museum and library communities, so for us it would be a good fit.”

One- and two-bedroom apartments will likely cost between $900 and $1,900 per month, Azola said. Wilson notes that most artists cannot afford such high prices, undercutting the city’s efforts to create a so-called “arts district.”
“Speculators and developers, in my opinion, are both good and bad for the area,” Watson said.
waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 25th, 2007, 06:07 PM   #327
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

Another downtown greenspace rehab:

Park's path: Folly to neglect, rebirth
A median garden downtown is to regain its 1920s grandeur
By Jill Rosen
Sun reporter
Originally published January 25, 2007

A sylvan sliver in the unlikeliest of places, an urban luxury once criticized as a former mayor's extravagance and then neglected for much of its nearly 100-year existence, Baltimore's Preston Gardens is finally getting its due.

The garden in the middle of St. Paul Street - which would more accurately be described as the city's fanciest median - is slated for a nearly $900,000 overhaul. The effort would not only restore the park to its former glory, but improve on it with a flourishing landscape, working fountains and better lighting - all in the hope that the hard-luck plot can become a real downtown park.

"It's an island in the middle of St. Paul Street, but for many people, the literally thousands of downtown businesspeople, it's kind of like a front yard," said Mike Evitts, spokesman for Downtown Partnership, the organization leading the restoration effort. "This could be a world-class park."

In the early 1900s, a fair number of Baltimoreans considered Mayor James H. Preston off his rocker as he zealously pushed a plan to spend $1.2 million on a slim park that would run for about three blocks along the middle of an expanded St. Paul Street.

The mayor's critics began calling the project "Preston's Folly." Those who owned homes in the path of the mayor's pet project were also less than thrilled.

Famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted came up with the idea for the park as he drafted ideas for Baltimore's overall green space in 1905, but it was Thomas Hastings, another esteemed architect, who designed it years later.

Officials in jackets with tails and straw hats gathered in May 1919 to dedicate Preston Terraces, as it was then known. Dignitaries took seats in chairs set out all along the imposing stone stairs.

"It is not uncommon," Hastings told the crowd, according to articles in The Sun at the time, "to see the useful without the beautiful, or the beautiful without the useful, but it is rare to see a section such as was this, almost useless and unquestionably ugly, transformed into magnificent terraces that have already given health and life to this vicinity as well as pleasure to all who come in contact therewith."

But it didn't take long for nature and neglect to start chipping away at Hastings' magnificence.

Just a couple of years after the dedication, city fathers briefly entertained a proposal to build a series of parking garages for 2,000 cars on the garden site. That fizzled, but by the Depression, with money for niceties like floral displays out of the question, the city began leaving the gardens bare for years at a time. Many mourned the missing tulips - shots of color that they so quickly had come to expect.

By the 1950s, winos in the park were almost part of the landscape, snoozing under the now-scruffy bushes. And despite the best efforts of the most determined garden clubs, Preston Gardens has been, more or less, on a sad decline ever since.

But the Downtown Partnership hopes to turn that around. With just under $900,000 to spend - most of which is coming from the city - the organization has plans for an overhaul, one that it hopes will have people reconsidering what has long been forgettable public space.

"It's really the largest chunk of green space we have downtown," said Nan Rohrer, the partnership's retail development director. "Hopefully, when we're finished with it, it will almost resemble an English garden and lawn."

Because of the park's lineage, those leading the beautification effort are quick to call it a "restoration" rather than a redesign. They want to carefully preserve the essence of Hastings' vision for the park but freshen it so that it works as well a century later.

"We're treading very lightly might be a way to think about it," said Carol Macht of Hord Coplan Macht, who's handling the design and said she's trying to reveal the fine bones beneath the unkempt plantings. "It's a privilege to be able to work with such wonderful architecture."

So they'll haul away dead trees and overgrown shrubs, scrub and repair the ornate stone staircases and retaining wall, and tinker with the southernmost of the two fountains to see whether it can be coaxed into working again. (The other fountain has more serious, cost-prohibitive issues and could become a planter.)

They'll pad the ground with fresh grass, fill in the ground with perennials and flowering trees, and add shade-throwing species along the park's west side.

The final touch will be lighting, arranged to wash over the architectural elements and to make people feel safe.

The Downtown Partnership has made refreshing the city's plazas something of a mission. Their $6 million Center Plaza reconstruction should be finished by summer, and they've tried to brighten the gray of Hopkins Plaza with landscaping and potted flowers.

The organization doesn't just want the parks to look good, it wants people to start using them.

To get folks into Preston Gardens, the organization tried holding movie nights. And in the fall it tried picnics with live music on Fridays.

The partnership surveyed downtown residents in the fall and found that quality-of-life issues are first on everyone's mind.

"It's more than just about aesthetics for their own sake," Evitts said. "The way things look affects how people perceive the environment."

Businesses that surround the gardens have taken an interest in its well-being. Tremont hotels, for instance, has contributed money to the cleanup. It considers the donation an investment of sorts.

Tremont's managing director, Michael Haynie, has been known to escape there, seeking shade and serenity on particularly trying days.

"We definitely believe in that park," Haynie said. "The more we highlight it and clean it up, the more it becomes a focal point to a re-energized area."
waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2007, 04:12 PM   #328
LordBaltimore
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 8
Likes (Received): 0

Thanks for posting the updates! Lets keep this board alive!
LordBaltimore no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2007, 01:03 AM   #329
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

Here's another view/angle of the new Hilton under construction. it still doesnt look great, but at least I can see how it relates to the rest of Pratt Street in this rendering.

waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2007, 06:54 AM   #330
chromebowler
Registered User
 
chromebowler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Baltimore & Minneapolis
Posts: 249
Likes (Received): 26

The 10IH project certainly appears to be the most exciting project in Baltimore these days. Good for Baltimore! I hope it spurs the development of other talls.
chromebowler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2007, 04:21 PM   #331
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

Design Collective recently posted these concept renderings for 300 East Pratt Street. Its listed as having only 40K sq of retail space. That sucks b/c I was hoping the developer would build something to rival the Gallery Mall. I have a feeling that will change though. When developers see how successful Lockwood Place and the store along Aliceanna Street in Harbor East are performing, they'll be compelled to add more retail to projects.



waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2007, 05:03 PM   #332
wada_guy
Oh say can YOU see?
 
wada_guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 782
Likes (Received): 0

I'd love to see the blue portion of the building's base be a Jumbotron TV!

What, no brick?

Last edited by wada_guy; February 1st, 2007 at 05:31 PM.
wada_guy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2007, 08:44 PM   #333
chromebowler
Registered User
 
chromebowler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Baltimore & Minneapolis
Posts: 249
Likes (Received): 26

Design Collective recently posted these concept renderings for 300 East Pratt Street. Its listed as having only 40K sq of retail space. That sucks b/c I was hoping the developer would build something to rival the Gallery Mall. I have a feeling that will change though. When developers see how successful Lockwood Place and the store along Aliceanna Street in Harbor East are performing, they'll be compelled to add more retail to projects.

Any idea how tall this is supposed to be?
chromebowler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2007, 09:31 PM   #334
rxsoccer
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 122
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by chromebowler View Post
Design Collective recently posted these concept renderings for 300 East Pratt Street. Its listed as having only 40K sq of retail space. That sucks b/c I was hoping the developer would build something to rival the Gallery Mall. I have a feeling that will change though. When developers see how successful Lockwood Place and the store along Aliceanna Street in Harbor East are performing, they'll be compelled to add more retail to projects.

Any idea how tall this is supposed to be?
supposed to be 50 stories tall....no estimate on actual height yet though...
rxsoccer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2007, 09:33 PM   #335
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

Quote:
Originally Posted by chromebowler View Post
Any idea how tall this is supposed to be?
50+ stories tall IIRC. In this rendering, however, it doesnt look much taller than 500-550ft tall or so.
waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 2nd, 2007, 02:04 AM   #336
The_Big_O
Drugs are bad, m'kay
 
The_Big_O's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: B-more
Posts: 78
Likes (Received): 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by wada_guy View Post
I'd love to see the blue portion of the building's base be a Jumbotron TV!
Same here, wada. But on another note, I absolutely hate the Hilton "Ho"tel blocking the view, from downtown, of Camden Yards. Damn, it's plan looking too. Four thumbs down!
The_Big_O no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 4th, 2007, 06:22 AM   #337
MasonsInquiries
B-MORE than u strive for!
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Baltimore/Columbia, Md.
Posts: 2,257
Likes (Received): 13

Quote:
Originally Posted by waj0527 View Post
50+ stories tall IIRC. In this rendering, however, it doesnt look much taller than 500-550ft tall or so.
well, we have to keep in mind that the 50 floors are condominium and hotel floors. the floors aren't going to be as big as, say, a 50-story office tower.
MasonsInquiries no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 4th, 2007, 06:38 AM   #338
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

1 light stret, the parcel in little Italy opposite Della Notte and the parcel in municiple center bounded by Baltimore and Fayette Streets and Guilford Ave. have to be developed. I'm tired of seeing those surface lots.
waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 7th, 2007, 05:30 PM   #339
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

Saw this pic of the Senator Theater recently, thought it was cool and worth sharing over here. The redevelopment of Belvedere Square has helped attract more businesses and patrons to that neighborhood. Apparently it isnt drawing more clientel to the Senator, which will be auctioned off in a bit. If this place closes, it would be a terrible blow to our non-waterfront development efforts. Anyway...here's the pic:

waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2007, 06:05 PM   #340
waj0527
Registered User
 
waj0527's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 2,598
Likes (Received): 484

The title of this article is a little deceiving b/c the company is still staying downtown, just not in the traditional CBD. As a result of this move, the design of the Four Seasons hotel and residence tower has changed. The Four Seasons will now be 36 floors instead of 24.

Here's a rendering of the towers:


Breaking News.......
Legg Mason leaving downtown home

(Chris Ammann/Baltimore Examiner)
Financial giant Legg Mason announced today it is leaving its downtown tower for new digs in Harbor East.

BALTIMORE - Legg Mason is getting a new address. The asset management firm announced Tuesday that it signed a 15-year agreement with H&S Development Corp. to lease up to 400,000 square feet in a proposed complex in Baltimore's Inner Harbor East.


The new Legg Mason tower in Harbor East will be home to the majority of the firm’s Baltimore-area employees, beginning in the summer of 2009, when the company plans to move.

“It's going to be brand new, state-of-the-art space that we can customize,” said Mary Athridge, spokeswoman for Legg Mason.

When Legg moves, it will leave behind its iconic home at the corner of Pratt and Light streets that bears its name. A standout along the Baltimore skyline, the building was constructed in 1973 and is the tallest in Maryland, according to Emporis, an international building and real estate data base.

The current Harbor East development covers eight square blocks — more than 500,000 square feet of retail and entertainment space and 1 million square feet of new Class-A office space.
The developer estimates the entire space will create more than 4,000 new jobs for Baltimore City, H&S said in a news release.

Legg Mason employees are looking forward to the new complex.

“There are pictures posted around of the new building, and people are saying, ‘this looks really nice,’” Athridge said.

As for Baltimore, the city is glad that Legg Mason is staying in Charm City.

“I think it’s great news,” said Kirby Fowler, president of The Downtown Partnership of Baltimore Inc. “We are glad to see that they are staying in Baltimore City and expanding.”

Athridge said the move isn’t that big of a deal, but the company is excited.

‘It's not that we're leaving,” she said, “but that we're taking advantage of the new space.”

[email protected]
[email protected]
waj0527 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu