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Old February 24th, 2006, 01:30 AM   #1
TallBox
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Heating/cooling a skyscraper

Hey

I've got a write a university-level essay on an area in environmental physics that I find interesting. Since everybody either does *global warming* or *nuclear power* I thought I'd do it on something quite mundane like environmental systems in buildings (preferably skyscrapers).

I've not really researched into the field, but maybe a few of you in the know could point me in the right directions and get me started? My particular interest is in new buildings that use passive heating/cooling systems via atria, radiators etc (Commerzbank, LBT etc)

Which skyscrapers employ stuff like atria and natural radiators into their design?

Maybe focusing on the environmental systems of one particular skyscraper would be interesting if I had enough information about it..

Thanks for any help
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Old February 24th, 2006, 02:03 AM   #2
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look at the book 'big and green' by david gissen...that should be most all what you need
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Old February 24th, 2006, 09:12 AM   #3
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Check out some of Ken Yeang's stuff. Run his name through Amazon, he wrote several books on natural heating of skyscrapers. Also if you really want to impress your teacher, study the way termites built their mounds in relation to this. Since the temperature within needs to be constant for the queen to breed, these mounds actually function like some funnel.
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Old February 25th, 2006, 09:49 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan
Check out some of Ken Yeang's stuff. Run his name through Amazon, he wrote several books on natural heating of skyscrapers. Also if you really want to impress your teacher, study the way termites built their mounds in relation to this. Since the temperature within needs to be constant for the queen to breed, these mounds actually function like some funnel.
I'm a big fan of biomimetics. 2+ billion years of evolution has created some spectacular solutions to many engineering problems.
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Old February 26th, 2006, 04:27 AM   #5
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OMG, I love this topic, hehe.

here are some sites that I used for my own research

*Department of Architecture, HKU
http://www.arch.hku.hk/teaching/lect...ent/sect02.htm
*United Nations University
http://www.unu.edu/unupress/unupbook...0.htm#Contents

these are more of keeping it cool, though, cos I live on the equator.
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Old February 27th, 2006, 01:04 AM   #6
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well most skyscrapers have very minimal needs for heating since all the equipment and people in the building are able to keep the building warm... almost all of the energy used in skyscrapers for HVAC systems is used to cool the space
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Old March 8th, 2006, 09:54 AM   #7
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Even in cold boston winters ? I wouldn't have thought of that.

Look at buildings with grass (yes grass, not glass) roofs, it's a pretty recent thing, it helps keep the temperature constant I heard.
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Old March 9th, 2006, 12:28 AM   #8
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the use of grass roofs in urban areas is usually more in the interest of storm water control...

although its uses related to heat are generally meant to counteract the "heat island effect" which results from the loss of large amounts of heat through the roof of a building...

that being said... nearly any commercial building of significant size [3 or more stories lets say] is going to spend a majority of the year under a cooling load... only during the most cold days of the year would there be a real need input heat into the indoor environment... anyone who has been in an office building in the middle of january when they decide to service the HVAC system will realize how hot a building can get in the middle of winter without air conditioning...
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Old March 9th, 2006, 01:47 AM   #9
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So what exactly is creating the heat ? Human
Copy machines
Computers
Lamps
Elevator motors...what else ?
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Old March 9th, 2006, 02:23 AM   #10
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everything you listed...

sun coming through the windows, the HVAC equipment itself, etc etc

it really doesn't take that much once you have brought the building up to temperature to keep it at that temperature...imagine how long it would take to get the elevator core of a highrise in boston down to the temperature outside on a freezing day if you shut the building down and evacuated all its occupants and turned off everything inside...that is alot of mass hold alot of heat
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