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Old March 8th, 2006, 02:13 AM   #81
wanderer34
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In order, it's:

1. Phila - It's where the first rowhomes were built, and is the home of the oldest residential street, Elfreth's Alley. Everywhere you go, from South Philly to North Philly, from West Philly and Overbrook to the Near and Far NE, and in Germantown and Roxbourough, the average house is the rowhome. You have Victorians, duplexes, and little mansions in the city (Chestnut Hill, Northwood, Spruce Hill, etc.), but the rowhome is Phila's trademark. And the most beautiful rowhomes belong to Phila.

2. Baltimore - The closest towards having the most number of rowhomes is Charm City. Most of the rowhomes seem more drab due to the same material and color used for it's rowhomes, but some do have hints of the DC and the Philly style of design.

3. NYC - Even though most of the "rowhomes" in NYC are considered brownstones (which they really are), it's more of an apartment and condo city because of it's huge density. From tenements to apartments to co-ops to projects, those are really the cities trademarks. The brownstones are the classical NYC residence, and where built during the late 1800's when NYC grew along with it's subways. Many professionals made their homes in brownstones, and you do have some Cape Cods in LI and the Bronx, but the brownstone is NYC's home.

4. DC - Even though many of the homes are technically rowhomes, they had more of a Victorian/French-style appearance towards certain stocks (i.e. Georgetown, Howard Univ, etc.).

Boston and the majority of NE is more of the triple-decker and the Cape Cods than the rowhomes you're used to seeing in Phila, Baltimore, and DC. Chicago is the home of the bungalow, and Pittsburgh and Detroit are for the single detached homes.
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Old March 8th, 2006, 07:43 AM   #82
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Chicago actually doesn't have very many bungalows. You'll only find them at the very edges of the city on the far north and southwest sides. Chicago is certianly surrounded by more bungalows than I've ever seen anywhere else. But it's a suburban thing. It's known as the bungalow belt. Around the city. Typical Chicago housing is 8-16 unit, 100 year old, brick faced, apartment buildings. And miles and miles of 2-3 floor single, wood or brick faced detached houses that are packed so tightly together that there is often only 1-3 feet between them. I don't know what they're called even though I've lived in a few of them. They aren't row houses exactly. Help? What are those things called? These(not my pictures) are typical Chicago homes:

http://www.pbase.com/goonsta/image/27702481
http://www.pbase.com/goonsta/image/37325682
http://www.pbase.com/goonsta/image/27702928
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Old March 8th, 2006, 11:31 PM   #83
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I feel it necessary to correct the misconception that "the majority of the Northeast is triple-deckers" etc., that I see repeatedly in this thread. While it's true that cities like Providence, Worcester and Boston have a fair number of triple-deckers and wood-frame two-families (and, in fact, a typical Boston triple-decker is significantly different from the variety found in Providence or Worcester - flat-roofed versus peaked), all three cities have a great variety of architecture beyond either rowhouses, triple-deckers or "French flats" (first time I've heard this is here).

Boston and Providence, in particular, have a great many Federalist and Greek Revival houses. All three have a large representation of large single-family Victorians and Edwardians (often broken up into multiple units). Case in point: virtually the entire East Side of Providence, West Side of Worcester, and large portions of Jamaica Plain in Boston are huge Victorians. Roxbury has a large percentage of Federalist and Greek Revival houses as well as Victorians; Ashmont, Savin Hill and Jones Hill in Dorchester are largely Victorian neighborhoods, etc.

Just a point of clarification.

Thanks.
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Old March 9th, 2006, 01:55 AM   #84
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First of all, Brownstones are rowhouses. In NY, because so many of the rows built between 1845, and 1873 are faced with brown sandstone, brownstone has become a synonym for any rowhouse. Ny has thousands of rowhouses that predate the "brownstone" era, and many thousands more built between 1880, and 1929 that are faced with other materials.

Ditto Roxbury Ranger.

As for Pittsburgh and Detroit, I wouldn't group those two together. Detroit has a ton of detatched single family homes, but it also has a lot of two family homes as well.
Pittsburgh on the other hand, also has lots of singles, but Pittsburgh has thousands of rowhomes as well.

Lastly, DC's houses aren't technically rowhouses. They are rowhouses. Style has nothing to do with whether a house is a rowhouse or not.

Last edited by herodotus; September 3rd, 2007 at 11:39 PM.
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Old March 9th, 2006, 05:42 AM   #85
steel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hedlunch
Chicago actually doesn't have very many bungalows. You'll only find them at the very edges of the city on the far north and southwest sides. Chicago is certianly surrounded by more bungalows than I've ever seen anywhere else. But it's a suburban thing. It's known as the bungalow belt. Around the city. Typical Chicago housing is 8-16 unit, 100 year old, brick faced, apartment buildings. And miles and miles of 2-3 floor single, wood or brick faced detached houses that are packed so tightly together that there is often only 1-3 feet between them. I don't know what they're called even though I've lived in a few of them. They aren't row houses exactly. Help? What are those things called? These(not my pictures) are typical Chicago homes:

http://www.pbase.com/goonsta/image/27702481
http://www.pbase.com/goonsta/image/37325682
http://www.pbase.com/goonsta/image/27702928

Wrong! Chicago has mega bungalows. the mayor even started a special program for bangalow restoration. The bungalow belt you refer to IS in the city. They are on the north side the south side the west side etc. Chi only has a very small area of row houses.
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Old March 9th, 2006, 03:05 PM   #86
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Well I know that Chicago has a ton of bungalows. But in the years that I lived in Chicago I hardly ever saw them. I moved around a lot while I lived there. Lived in Pilsen, Wicker Park, Humbolt Park and Ukranian Village. I worked in Lakeview and Logan Square and Evanston had a GF who lived in Irving Park. You can go back and forth between all those areas and not see a single bungalow. You can go all the way south to Pullman and all the way west to Cicero or Oak Park without seeing one. That's an area many times the size of Baltimore. I would guess also that much more than half of the population of the city lives in that older inner core. The houses in that inner core are not row houses. But they are multi story and very densely packed and not bungalows. But yes Chicago does have a lot of bungalows but I guess I never thought of that part of the city as being in the city.
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Old March 9th, 2006, 03:17 PM   #87
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I know this is off topic and I apologize for that. But Chicago's bungalow belt, in my experiance is almost entirely outside of the area shown developed on this map. And the area shown developed on this map is larger than many of the Northeastern cities being discussed in this thread.

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Old March 9th, 2006, 04:31 PM   #88
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Okay. Sorry. One more. I did a little research. The area inside the bungalow belt in Chicago is at least 80-100 square miles. Compare to Baltimore at 81, Philly 135, DC 61, Boston 48. The total for Chicago is 227 sqm. The housing inside that area aside from apartment buildings is variously described as 2 and 3 flats, townhomes and rowhouses. The thing is though that most of those houses do not share common exterior walls although some do. And they were not built in rows but most often built independently however close together. And here even is a map of the "bungalow belt" from this site:
http://tigger.uic.edu/depts/ahaa/imagebase/buildings/

An area which I always thought of as the suburbs:

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Old March 9th, 2006, 04:38 PM   #89
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Philly is still the King of Rowhouses not Chicago
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Old March 9th, 2006, 05:20 PM   #90
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I am not desputing that. At all. I lived in Philly briefly and nothing really comes close. If anything I'm saying that Chicago has vast amounts of housing that is similar but not exactly the same as north eastern row houses. So does SF.
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Old March 10th, 2006, 05:49 AM   #91
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For a smaller city, Wilmington has its share







Easily, Wilmington is 85% rowhomes, from cheap and broken down, to large and grand, to front step, to front porch, to front porch cage, new and old. It's what the northeast is about.
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Old March 10th, 2006, 05:52 AM   #92
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Nice town I need to check it out!
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Old March 10th, 2006, 06:15 AM   #93
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Wilmington is a pretty nice town. It's seems to exemplify the mid-atlantic. It's got the feel, demographics, architecture, and age.
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Old March 10th, 2006, 07:39 AM   #94
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Usually when I travel home from DC & pts south I take 295 across the Del Mem Br to the NJ Tpk. Last time I took 95 through Wilmington, Chester, & Phila for fun. I was pleasantly surprised by the number of rowhouses you can see from the interstate in Wilm.
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Old March 11th, 2006, 11:47 PM   #95
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^ Because I-95 curves around Phila, and Northeast Philadelphia is so frickin' huge, you can almost OD on Phila from the airport, to Trenton. I love it.
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Old March 12th, 2006, 03:29 AM   #96
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Speaking of I-95, has anyone seen the place right north of Wilmington where I-95 is surrounded by two streets? Like 95 is their street that they live on. If anyone has a picture of that, that would be great!!! [Edit]: never mind, here it is-
I-95
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Old March 19th, 2006, 02:49 AM   #97
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Philly without a doubt. 60% of the over-500,000 homes in the city are rowhouses. How can you even argue?
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Old March 19th, 2006, 03:33 AM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seanlax5
Speaking of I-95, has anyone seen the place right north of Wilmington where I-95 is surrounded by two streets? Like 95 is their street that they live on. If anyone has a picture of that, that would be great!!! [Edit]: never mind, here it is-
I-95
I think Chester has something like that too IIRC. That would REALLY suck to live on..
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Old June 21st, 2007, 11:09 PM   #99
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I forgot about this thread.
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Old June 22nd, 2007, 01:08 AM   #100
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Its Philly. Their the king of Row Houses.
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