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Old March 21st, 2006, 10:34 PM   #21
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Is the 1000-foot skyscraper approved? It is hard to understand why it is so hard to build a single skyscraper in a big American city when they build hundreds in much smaller cities in Asia. Probably because of the growth...
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Old March 22nd, 2006, 05:18 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightsky
Is the 1000-foot skyscraper approved? It is hard to understand why it is so hard to build a single skyscraper in a big American city when they build hundreds in much smaller cities in Asia. Probably because of the growth...
It's not approved yet but there are many developers bidding for the site now. I just hope that this tower is a mix-used instead of full office tower. This is because the South Station Tower's approval seems imminent and very close to the near future.
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Old March 23rd, 2006, 05:08 AM   #23
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Park Essex: Opening this year.


2 Financial Center


Pier 4


Battery Wharf


Pier 1



Clippership Wharf


Fan Pier


Fort Point


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Old March 23rd, 2006, 05:44 AM   #24
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WOW....
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Old March 23rd, 2006, 05:49 AM   #25
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Those are a bevy of very cool looking projects!
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Old March 23rd, 2006, 06:33 AM   #26
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Trilogy: Set to open in 2006


Boston Harbor Residences: Set to open in 2006


1330 Boylston Street




Waterside Place



Piano Row Dorm: Set to open in 2006


Boston Folio: Set to open 2006

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Old March 23rd, 2006, 06:56 PM   #27
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keep up the good work....boston has some awesome projects
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Old March 24th, 2006, 03:42 PM   #28
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Glad to see that Boston area is joining the global era of urbanization and modernization.

Keep it up guys!
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Old March 25th, 2006, 08:30 AM   #29
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Anybody have a map of the city with lables showing where these proposals would go?

Also, Ive heard that BU wants to build a new dorm, around 30 floors. On the western campus, so I guess next to the highway?

Also, will the Harvard expansion lead to any major new buildings?
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Old March 25th, 2006, 06:20 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesinclair
Anybody have a map of the city with lables showing where these proposals would go?

Also, Ive heard that BU wants to build a new dorm, around 30 floors. On the western campus, so I guess next to the highway?

Also, will the Harvard expansion lead to any major new buildings?
Yea BU and Northeastern University are seeking to build high-rise dorms. The one for NU will be 21 floors.
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Old March 25th, 2006, 07:24 PM   #31
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wow i live in malden , no real development around malden though
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Old March 25th, 2006, 09:40 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by DarkFenX
Columbus Center
Height:425ft/128m
Floors:35



Columbus Center Comes Close to Sealing Financing Deal
By Beverly Ford
February 17, 2006


Reminds me a lot the Gropius' project for the Chicago Tribune. Not as good as the original anyway
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Old March 26th, 2006, 01:38 AM   #33
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College high-rise dorms. No rendering except for BU. These are the articles.

This rendering is 3 years old and may not be accurate. The article announces a 21-story tower and a 19 story tower. Boston University:



Village dorms entering new phase
New buildings to house more than 2,000
By Christina Crapanzano
Published: Thursday, February 16, 2006



More than 2,000 Boston University students may have the opportunity to live in the Student Village complex within the next two years, according to Fort Point Associates President Jamie Fay and Cannon Design architect John Berchert.

A year after the opening of the Fitness and Recreation Center and Agganis arena, the duo presented a design for the third phase of the Student Village - an expanded housing complex - at the Boston University Community Task Force meeting Wednesday night.

"We're targeting sometime in May to go to the board and get approval," Fay said.

Berchert explained a change in the design of the third phase. The new design will connect two of the previously proposed buildings, creating a north and south tower.

"It's taking two of the towers from two years ago and connecting them into one tower, north and south," he said.

Fay said that project could be completed in two years if construction begins this May.

The buildings were redesigned and consolidated to preserve the skyline along the Charles River.

According to Berchert, the north tower will have 26 floors and consist of four-person apartment-style residences, and the south tower will have 19 floors and will consist of eight-person suites.

The new buildings will also be "lighter-skinned" in comparison to the residences at 10 Buick Street.

The goal of the task force is to create 2,300 beds between the residences. In the distant future, according to Berchert, a third building will need to be constructed, containing more than 500 additional beds.

Task Force chairperson Pamela Beale said the groups has accomplished its goal of making the new residences feel more like a campus.

"It really gives it a sense of campus," she said, "which is what we all had hoped for."

Task Force representative Edward King said planners were also waiting to hear about another project that would help build a more unified campus for the university

The plan would transform a lane of traffic between Kenmore Square and the BU Bridge into a row of grass and trees, as well as create a safer walking environment for students and faculty commuting to class.

It would make it much safer for students and faculty," King said, "and make it feel a little more campus-like."

Cottage Farm Neighborhood Association representative Archibald Mazmanian mentioned BU's property purchase at 928 Commonwealth Ave. in relation to the new construction. King said this will be the location of BU's School of Hospitality Administration, and it will have no bearing on the Student Village construction.

Suffolk University plans a 31 story dorm tower:

Plan may disrupt Garden of Peace
By Lisa Wangsness, Globe Staff | November 24, 2005


Tucked into the corner of a quiet plaza between the State House and City Hall, the Garden of Peace was meant to be a haven for families of homicide victims, a place to reflect on the loved ones memorialized there. Since the garden's dedication last year, families have come from across Massachusetts to sit among the river rocks, carved with some 500 names of murder victims, and mourn their loss.

So it came as an unpleasant surprise to the garden's founders when they learned that Suffolk University is considering a plan to turn a nearby nine-story state-owned office building into a 31-story tower that would house a 792-bed dormitory and student center.

Evelyn Tobin, a cofounder of the garden, said that adding a dormitory with hundreds of students passing through each day would wreck the atmosphere of the memorial they worked for years to build, and that many consider a special place.

''This is totally not compatible with the spirit of the garden," said Tobin, whose daughter was stabbed to death in Lexington in 1992 by an unknown assailant.

Suffolk University officials say they have met with representatives from the Garden of Peace to discuss their concerns. But they say that adding dormitory space would alleviate the pressure on the housing market in a city where universities abound and student housing is scarce.

Mayor Thomas M. Menino and other Boston officials have spent years badgering universities to add dormitories to free up housing for residents. Though many institutions have responded, adding more than 6,000 beds between 1998 and 2004, unmet demand for dormitory space in the city could be as high as 17,200 beds, according to a Boston Redevelopment Authority study published last year.

Suffolk's initial proposal for the project would roughly double the number of dormitory beds the university has for its 4,300 Boston undergrads, said Pat Meservey, the university's provost and academic vice president.

''We have limited housing for our students at this point, and we feel that it is in both the students' and the city's best interest to increase the number of beds we have available," Meservey said.

After a competitive bidding process last spring, the state chose Suffolk's proposal to redevelop 20 Somerset St., which until last year housed the Metropolitan District Commission. The development team is now conducting engineering studies to determine whether its plans would be feasible for the site. The scale of the tower project, which would cost more than $100 million, remains uncertain and would take several years to complete, Meservey said.

If a sale goes through in January, the university would still have to secure approvals from the BRA, which will include opportunities for public input.

Molly Sherden, vice president of government affairs for the Beacon Hill Civic Association, said that she had not seen plans for the project, but that she is concerned that it could threaten the Garden of Peace. ''I know how valuable memorials are to people who have lost loved ones for different reasons, and as I understand the project currently, I think it would have a very significant negative impact on the Garden of Peace," Sherden said.

A decade in the planning, the garden is on state land set aside through legislation during the redevelopment of 100 Cambridge Street, formerly the Saltonstall building, a state office building plagued by environmental problems, Tobin said.

Families of homicide victims who have a connection to Massachusetts can request to have their loved one's name inscribed on one of more than 1,000 river rocks that together represent a dry riverbed; among them are John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy. At one end of the riverbed is a symbol of hope and rebirth: a cast bronze sculpture of three ibis soaring skyward by Judy Kensley McKie, whose son was stabbed to death in Cambridge in 1990.

Tobin said that she and others involved with the garden understand the need for dormitories in Boston and have nothing against college students. But she said they believe that the Suffolk project ought to be located somewhere else and not only because of the noise and hubbub it could create. The tower's landscape architect, she said, believes that the structure could create wind effects and cast shadows that would harm the garden's vegetation.

''They were very polite, but they gave us really no assurances that we would have any input at all into the plan that they have," she said.

Meservey said the university would take every precaution to mitigate the proposed tower's effect on the garden, including locating the entrance on the opposite side of the building to limit student traffic and offering landscaping to shelter it.

Northeastern University plans for a 21-story tower and a 9-story building:

NU plans to build 2 high-rise dormitories

By Heather Allen and Maria Sacchetti, Globe Correspondent and Globe Staff | March 15, 2005


Northeastern University, under pressure from the city to move its students into dormitories, is planning to build two high-rise residence halls that would house 1,560 students.

The university has begun rolling out its plan to community groups, but is already facing criticism from some neighbors, who worry that the plan would add density to the largely residential area.

One of the dorms, an 855-bed, 210,000-square-foot building, would be located in the Symphony area, in a parking lot between Gainsborough, Hemenway, and St. Stephen streets. The other, a 705-bed, 321,000-square-foot dorm, would be built on the Roxbury side of the campus, in a parking lot on Camden Street, near the Massachusetts Avenue T stop. That building would have three separate sections: one seven stories tall, one nine stories tall, and a tower reaching 21 stories in height.

''There's a real sense of urgency to get some residence halls built as quickly as possible," said Northeastern spokesman Fred McGrail.

McGrail said high-rise towers are necessary because the school has limited land on which to build. No exact height has been set for the Symphony area dorm, which would house freshmen, but college officials have said a tower would best fit with the aesthetics of the surrounding neighborhood.

The university is planning to submit the plan April 1 to the Boston Redevelopment Authority April 1. The plan reflects an effort by the city and college officials to free up off-campus student apartments for families and other adults, and move students into dorms with greater oversight. Northeastern University is one of several schools that have been criticized for student rioting after recent events, such as the World Series and the Super Bowl.

''It's something we're encouraging citywide to get college students out of the apartments in neighborhoods," said BRA spokeswoman Susan Elsbree, ''but it has to be in the right place with the right density and heights."

Northeastern officials stress that they are trying to show sensitivity to neighbors as they move forward with the plan. But residents of the densely populated Symphony area, which has historically been home to many students, are expressing concern that the dorms will add many more people to a packed neighborhood.

John Caux, a member of the Gainsborough Neighborhood Association, said many of the residents felt "blindsided" by the plan and want more time to the study it. The residents are eager to have students, especially freshmen, move out of their neighborhoods, he said, but the Symphony area dormitory would still be too close to their homes.

To fight the plan, he said, the association has been holding meetings and polling its 300 residents, who oppose the dorm, 8-1. The Gainsborough association's paid security force routinely encounters students who urinate in public or are noisy, he said.

''We feel we have an unfair proportion of freshmen students in our neighborhood already," said Caux, 38, who graduated from Northeastern. ''Having more students crammed in here with us really isn't fair."

At a community meeting last night, some residents asked the university to postpone submitting its plans to the BRA and consider other locations. But Robert Gittens, Northeastern's vice president for government relations, said the planned locations would allow the university to move all its students out of leased housing and onto campus by 2010, which Northeastern agreed to do during negotiations with the city. .

That agreement was designed to smooth relations between Northeastern and its neighbors, which have frayed badly as the school has changed from a commuter campus to a primarily residential college, with 14,000 undergraduates and 25,000 students total. About half of NU undergraduates live on campus.

In February 2004, after the New England Patriots' Super Bowl victory, a student celebration turned into a violent riot with cars overturned and others vandalized.

On Symphony Road, a young Mattapan man in a sport utility vehicle struck and killed James Grabowski, the 21-year-old son of a State Police officer who studied at North Shore Community College and was visiting his younger brother at Northeastern.

The driver also left Jason Stackiewicz, a Northeastern student, critically injured with head injuries. Stackiewicz has since returned to campus and resumed his studies

The 2003 murder of a student in an off-campus apartment leased by Northeastern, a slaying that may have been drug-related, also raised concern about security in off-campus leased apartments. Seth Gitell, spokesman for Mayor Thomas M. Menino, said the mayor wants the university to balance its expansion needs with neighbors' concerns. ''The mayor is hoping for a resolution that both takes care of the interests of housing students, but does so in a way that is very sensitive to all the impacted communities," Gitell said.

Northeastern has clashed with neighbors in the past. In 1998, after months of wrangling with city residents, the university agreed to reduce the number of students it would house in its dorms on Columbus Avenue and add more affordable housing.

The compromise, which was a $40 million project and a watershed event for Lower Roxbury, meant the addition of 595 student-housing units and 60 units for first-time homebuyers from the area, as well as 15 more housing units at a separate site.

The university, which is now developing a master plan for further development, has also expressed interest in three nearby properties, including the YMCA on Huntington Avenue, the now-closed St. Ann's Church, and 109 Hemenway St.

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Old March 26th, 2006, 01:41 AM   #34
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West End faces Equity Residential makeover
Tom Witkowski
Journal Staff



The Boston Redevelopment Authority last week approved a plan to add five new buildings to Charles River Park in the city's West End, the first new housing in the neighborhood in 25 years.

Pending further city approvals, West End Residences at Emerson Place will house 306 one- and two-bedroom luxury rental apartments. Chicago-based developer Equity Residential will construct new buildings where an above-ground parking garage and 18 townhouses currently rest.

Neighbors of the proposed development requested Equity also build a community center, but the center was not part of the plan approved by the BRA.

"We're going to continue working on that with them," said Jessica Shumaker, a spokeswoman for the BRA.

The BRA supports the project because it will increase housing in Boston, Shumaker said.

Equity Residential will also construct a 14-story building overlooking the Charles River on the Storrow Drive side of the complex. Construction is expected to begin in middle to late 2005 and end in 2007.

The new buildings are a redevelopment of a portion of Charles River Park, which itself was a redevelopment of the previous West End neighborhood, razed in 1959 as part of a controversial urban-renewal effort.

"There was this expectation that Charles River Park was, for all intents and purposes, complete," said Greg White, the Vienna, Va.-based vice president of Equity Residential who handles this region.

Charles River Park replaced blocks of dense low-rise housing with high-rise buildings distributed along a swath of open space left when the old West End was demolished. The new buildings add more housing to the city and that neighborhood.

"Activity is better, and that's what this project will create. It will bring new residents to the community and will create activity as a result of creating additional residences," said White.

The current plan is the result of a neighborhood approval process that included the West End Civic Association and West End Council. Originally, Equity proposed a 23-story building in 2001, but the plan was revised. The developer will designate 15 percent of the apartments as affordable housing, surpassing the 10 percent minimum requirement.

The current plan includes 660 underground parking spaces, one building with an 11-story section and an eight-story section, three three-story buildings and the 14-story building on Storrow Drive. The Storrow Drive building will create more of an urban edge to Charles River Park, White said.

Neighbors had objected to the original plan as too dense.

"It took some of the density out of the core of Charles River Park, placed it on the periphery and created no significant impact to the community in terms of views and new construction," White said.

Equity Residential currently owns 1,172 rental apartments in the complex; 462 at Emerson Place, to which the new ones will be added; and 710 at nearby Longfellow Place, on Staniford Street. Occupancy at Charles River Park is currently around 95 percent, said White.

While the current luxury-rental market has been "somewhat stagnant," White believes it will improve by the time the project is completed.
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Old March 26th, 2006, 01:43 AM   #35
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A possible pair of 23-30 story towers at Lafayette:

Condo tower power: Lafayette plan rises
By Scott Van Voorhis/ Herald Exclusive
Thursday, July 14, 2005



A pair of roughly 30-story residential towers would soar into the Hub's skyline at the edge of Downtown Crossing under a plan floated by a veteran city developer and Celtics owner, the Herald has learned.

Robert Epstein, head of development firm The Abbey Group and a part owner of the Celtics, is pitching plans for the twin towers as part of his effort to sell a major downtown office complex, documents reviewed by the Herald show.

A firm hired by Epstein is marketing the Lafayette Corporate Center, a six-story, 600,000-plus square-foot office and retail complex filled with State Street workers, to prospective buyers.

But in a bid to spice up interest in the property, Epstein's marketing agents are also touting the potential for a pair of 23-story residential towers over the garage of the downtown office complex. The possibility of adding a seventh story of offices to Lafayette is also held out, which would boost any residential towers into the 30-story range.

The 560,000 square feet of residential space would be enough for several hundred condos or apartments.

``Holy smokes,'' said Robert Cleary, president of the Codman Co., a downtown commercial real estate firm, reacting to what he called the New York scale of the plan. ``I would say that is pretty aggressive.''

The proposal comes as a series of new developments - from the Ritz-Carlton towers and renovated Opera House to the new Park Essex apartment high-rise now under construction - remakes the Lower Washington Street area.

Once the city's red light zone on the edge of Downtown Crossing, the area is fast becoming a hotbed of pricey high-rise developments.

Still, the height is sure to trigger protests, said Thomas Meagher, head of Northeast Apartment Advisors, a development consulting and research firm. Activists in nearby Chinatown have waged a long battle against perceived encroachment by luxury residential towers.

``Height is a big problem in that they are going to have to battle . . . the neighborhood activists,'' Meagher said. ``It is an area that is definitely on the rise (but) it is fair to say it's still a bit hardscrabble.''

The twin tower residential proposal floated by Epstein, the Hub developer and sports owner, comes as city condo prices soar.
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Old March 26th, 2006, 03:33 AM   #36
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great news
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Old March 31st, 2006, 12:34 AM   #37
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Another slim high-rise though I'm not sure of the official height.



Developer to buy the sausage site
Boston firm plans 500-room hotel on Congress St. land

By Thomas C. Palmer Jr., Globe Staff | March 30, 2006



The sausage is being sold.

Madison Properties Inc. of Boston says it will purchase a tiny strip of land known as the sausage site on the South Boston Waterfront and build a 500-room hotel there.

Denis P. Dowdle, a principal at Madison Properties, said yesterday his company is buying the Congress Street land, just under 3/4 of an acre, from NStar, which obtained it years ago in a land swap with the Big Dig.

Dowdle declined to say how much Madison is paying for the property, but the hotel project is expected to cost about $100 million, he said.

The site has been on the market since September, brokered by Meredith & Grew Oncor, but it has long been of interest to potential developers.

Dowdle said he plans two hotels in one -- an extended-stay inn on one side, and a limited-service one on the other. Both would feature room prices lower than those expected at other hotels being built around the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center.

Extended-stay and limited-service brands are ''not all that common" in urban areas, said Dowdle. ''It's hard to find parcels that lend themselves to this."

A deal has not been struck with a hotel operator, he said, but he hopes to close on the land in April. He anticipates starting the permitting process this summer, breaking ground next year, and opening before 2009.

Parking for 130 cars would be on the first five floors, with hotel lobbies on floors six and seven. As with most modestly priced hotels, it would not have large restaurants or a ballroom.

The hotel would continue the accelerated pace of waterfront development. Rapid build-out in the area has been predicted for three decades, but plans have often been stalled by downturns in the market, disputes over uses and layouts, differences among landowners, or opposition from City Hall.

Mayor Thomas M. Menino, who supported 1997 legislation for the new convention center, pledged that almost 5,000 new hotel rooms would be built by the time it opened in 2004 -- a goal the Boston Redevelopment Authority says was reached.

Developer Joseph F. Fallon and his partners are expected to open in June the 793-room Westin Boston Waterfront hotel at the convention center, and two apartment buildings along Northern Avenue.

Also, the Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel, with 471 rooms, is under construction next to Fallon's apartments.

And Fallon is talking to architects and possible tenants for the first phase of 21 acres of development at Fan Pier -- including an office building, a hotel and condominiums, and retail space.

The sausage site is zoned for buildings no more than 155 feet high, but with city approval it could accommodate about 250 feet, making it taller than the 178-foot-high exhaust stacks on the nearby Big Dig ventilation building on Summer Street over the Massachusetts Turnpike tunnel.

Because of the proximity of Logan Airport in East Boston, Federal Aviation Administration regulations limit building heights on the waterfront.

''One of the prime benefits of this is you certainly block the view from the water and coming up Congress Street as well," Dowdle said.

The architect is Group One Partners Inc. of South Boston. Dowdle said the building would be a combination of glass, like the Manulife Financial tower on the waterfront, and masonry, like the nearby World Trade Center West.

Madison Properties was founded in 2002. The company secured permits for the Residence Inn now open in Dedham and is building a 350,000-square-foot shopping center near Route 146 in Worcester.
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Old April 3rd, 2006, 08:22 AM   #38
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Good to see some action in Boston, it's long past due for the city.
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Old April 8th, 2006, 05:28 AM   #39
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Another high-rise proposed. This time it is 28 stories high.



Stuart St. Tower Proposed
Apr 7, 2006

by Adam Smith
The skyline around Chinatown will continue to rise if a Boston developer succeeds in its plan to construct a 28-story condo building on Stuart Street.

The tower, proposed by Weston Associates, would replace the parking lot of the Jacob Wirth Restaurant and extend to La Grange Street. It will not touch the restaurant, which is a Boston landmark.

Weston Associates, who presented the proposal at this week’s Chinatown Safety Committee meeting, said it would likely devote the first six floors to hotel or office use and the top 22 floors to residential units, likely condominiums.

The project’s proposed height at 303 feet would double the site's zoning cap of 155 feet. In the past several years, buildings of similar height have been approved by the city, including Kensington Place, Park Essex, the Metropolitan, and Millennium Towers. Community groups and Chinatown residents have been divided on the trend of bypassing zoning limits. Some have supported allowing the high-rise projects, saying they will bring new housing and consumers to the area, while others have protested the towers, saying they are out of character with the neighborhood and unaffordable for most residents.

Louis Miller, attorney for the developer, did not say what zoning mechanism the developer would use to get around the height limit. Miller speculated the developer would not seek a planned development area designation, the same zoning mechanism used by the nearby Kensington Place to get approval for its 30-story tower. A planned development area designation allows developers special zoning -- and zoning relief -- for large or complex projects that have a footprint of one acre or more.

Weston Associates will present its proposal at the Chinatown Neighborhood Council meeting later this month.

Located in the Midtown Cultural District, the project site is not technically in Chinatown but abuts the neighborhood.

“We anticipate this is going to be a lengthy development process,” said Miller.
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Old April 8th, 2006, 08:29 AM   #40
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"Task Force representative Edward King said planners were also waiting to hear about another project that would help build a more unified campus for the university

The plan would transform a lane of traffic between Kenmore Square and the BU Bridge into a row of grass and trees, as well as create a safer walking environment for students and faculty commuting to class.

It would make it much safer for students and faculty," King said, "and make it feel a little more campus-like.""

Im against this proposal. Comm Ave is a pretty important road for the city, and has many cars already. Getting rid of one lane will only make a traffic jam. Theres no real alternative, as Storrow has few exits.

Id prefer removing the "turn left" lanes. This would allow the green line to move faster, expand the stops to be safer (some stops are just a narrow sidewalk) and create a narrower road while not hurting traffic. Plant a few trees, and its much better than axing a whole lane.
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