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Old June 21st, 2008, 05:34 AM   #21
Svartmetall
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Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Having seen how Sydney bus drivers give out change and have all that money in a little box by their seats, I'm surprised I didn't hear much about bus robberies, especially late at night.
That happens quite commonly in Auckland actually. The drivers often carry a lot of cash and have no security on the bus (such as security screens around the drivers cab, CCTV etc) and often the buses are very empty after 19:00. I get chatting to a lot of my regular drivers and nearly all of them have been robbed at least once. One of my most friendly drivers has been quite violently assaulted when doing the route 68 towards Botany Town Centre because that route goes through Panmure, a rather dodgy suburb of Auckland.
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Old June 21st, 2008, 08:29 AM   #22
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I hope he isn't involved with a drug cartel.
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Old June 21st, 2008, 11:27 AM   #23
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I hope he isn't involved with a drug cartel.
I highly doubt it. Most of the attacks are random, opportunity driven attacks as the cashbox is easily accessible and has obvious amounts of money in it.

The rest of the attacks tend to be because they're annoyed with the driver and give them a pop in the face for good measure!
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Old June 21st, 2008, 12:10 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by 6-6-6 View Post
pic from ominorg; mexican forum:

mexico city:
[IMG][/IMG]

we dont know what happened to that guy, the subway could be very dangerous at night and yes, in some lines, the first wagons (2 i think) are for the girls, woman, and moms with kids in the rush hour, this program is very old, it's been used since was a kid.

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Old June 21st, 2008, 12:20 PM   #25
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I am surprised that bus drivers in Australian and New Zealand transport networks dont fall victim to more serious crime more often. Driving around without any form of barrier, be it plexiglass or bars is asking for trouble. But a product of the save money not installing them because that kind of thing doesnt really happen here mentality both countries suffer from. Tell that to the male bus driver who was raped driving through Brisbanes notorious suburb of Inala. (!!!!!!) And man an empty bus driving through dodgy areas late at night with a cashbox with possibly upwards of $200 (Im guessing) might be seen as an easy target- whether premeditated or opportunistic.
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Old June 21st, 2008, 12:26 PM   #26
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I am surprised that bus drivers in Australian and New Zealand transport networks dont fall victim to more serious crime more often. Driving around without any form of barrier, be it plexiglass or bars is asking for trouble. But a product of the save money not installing them because that kind of thing doesnt really happen here mentality both countries suffer from. Tell that to the male bus driver who was raped driving through Brisbanes notorious suburb of Inala. (!!!!!!) And man an empty bus driving through dodgy areas late at night with a cashbox with possibly upwards of $200 (Im guessing) might be seen as an easy target- whether premeditated or opportunistic.
Yeah I think it's highly odd too, Milan that additional security isn't installed. Unfortunately like I said, from talking to drivers in Auckland it happens all too often. The cashboxes and their contents are (fortunately) insured so the drivers are instructed to hand everything over if threatened at all, but it doesn't stop them from being roughed up a bit when it does happen.
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Old June 21st, 2008, 12:36 PM   #27
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It does annoy me to the fact that many of these drivers are recent immigrants too, probably unaware of exaclty what dangers the job entails. "Welcome to this incredibly safe place, for your first job as you get on your feet take yourself through our roughest areas and experience the joy of being harrassed by idiot drunk teens at midnight for a pittance."
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Old June 22nd, 2008, 12:52 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
I highly doubt it. Most of the attacks are random, opportunity driven attacks as the cashbox is easily accessible and has obvious amounts of money in it.

The rest of the attacks tend to be because they're annoyed with the driver and give them a pop in the face for good measure!
LOL I was referring to the Mexican picture. Someone lying on the ground like that is not a good sign.
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Old June 22nd, 2008, 05:47 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
Yeah I think it's highly odd too, Milan that additional security isn't installed. Unfortunately like I said, from talking to drivers in Auckland it happens all too often. The cashboxes and their contents are (fortunately) insured so the drivers are instructed to hand everything over if threatened at all, but it doesn't stop them from being roughed up a bit when it does happen.
Actually, that may be one more reason why people want to rob bus drivers - since they'll readily hand over the money as it is not theirs anyway. Probably a good intention guidance that may result in more crime.
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Old June 30th, 2008, 08:22 PM   #30
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i know that NYC has a low subway crime rate. Gone are the days when the car doors and windows wouldn't shut and colorful graffitti lined the walls,Thank goodness. Many people still assume that the subway is not safe, probably because of how unsanitary the stations and cars are. What the MTA needs is federal and state funding.
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Old July 18th, 2008, 04:24 PM   #31
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Transit police fight crime with baton and bravado
COLIN O’CONNOR/TORONTO STAR


Danielle Blay is one of 95 special constables in TTC's employ who patrol system with full police powers to make arrests. Blay confesses she loves her job. "It's not going to be the gun call that gets us hurt," she says. "It’s the smoker we investigate who might have a gun."

RIDING HERD ON TTC MISDEEDS

975
Arrests by special constables in 2007

906
Smoking charges issued by special constables last year

1,003
Tickets issued to people trying to pay less than the posted fare

1,556
Fare evasion charges laid last year

95
Non-unionized special constables now in TTC's employ.

The ranks include uniformed patrol corps, investigative officers and a system security unit that devises crime prevention programs.

117
Special constables expected to be serving by the end of the year

92
Number of the 117 to be deployed on the front lines

11
Weeks of classroom training taken by special constables

6
Months of field training taken with a coach/officer

1
Percentage of applicants hired as special constables

July 16, 2008
Tess Kalinowski
Transportation Reporter


They confront the same weapons, the same kinds of assaults, theft, street drugs and drunks as regular Toronto police officers do.

As sworn peace officers, they have the power to issue tickets and make arrests for all manner of crimes, as well as for TTC bylaw infractions.

But the men and women who wear the blue uniform of Toronto's "other" police force battle a public perception that they're just glorified security guards.

"Our officers are very motivated, very professional, and it can be challenging if you're dealing with somebody who's questioning your authority," says the TTC's chief special constable, Terry Andrews.

The role of the TTC's 95 special constables came under scrutiny recently when an outside consultant began reviewing the job and its use-of-force requirements, including whether to arm constables.

Last week, the transit corps was credited with helping to keep the growth in crimes on the system to about 4 per cent – on pace with gains in ridership last year.

Transit police uphold the law on a system that carries 1.5 million riders daily – twice the size of Mississauga, says Sgt. Rick Stewart, who allowed the Star to join him on patrol recently.

Earlier that day, two special constables arrested a woman accused of stealing a purse and attacking a rider with a knife. Two weeks earlier, they arrested a man believed to have pushed someone off a subway platform in May.

Like all police, they spend a lot of time responding to routine calls, discouraging panhandling and loitering, answering questions and offering directions.

Even with teams stationed underground and in surface vehicles, they face a challenge to get to the scene before a problem disappears down the tunnel or out the nearest exit.

Unlike security guards, who can act only if they see a crime in progress, special constables can make arrests if they believe a crime has been committed on TTC property.

"We arrest you on reasonable grounds, we search you, we seize evidence, we escort you to the police station, we write up a police report," says Stewart.

Most transit riders treat them with courtesy and respect.

Those most likely to challenge their authority are troublemakers with the savvy to recognize their uniform is different – no red stripe down the pants, a pale blue shirt, a blue band around the hat and no "police" emblem.

The distinction is "misleading," says Stewart, "because there is no enforcement option I can't (use) that a regular police officer can, except the Highway Traffic Act."

Plainly visible on their uniforms are the Kevlar vest, expandable baton, handcuffs, radio and pepper foam. It's what's not there that has drawn the most controversy.

Special constables do not carry Tasers or firearms, and a discussion of those weapons has been removed from the parameters of the review to be released later this year.

Six transit cops interviewed by the Star say guns and Tasers are tools they should have.

"There's not a police service in the province that would do the work we do unarmed," says Stewart, an 11-year veteran of the TTC.

At the same time, armed or not "there's not one of our constables who would stop doing this," he says.

"Anybody who's involved in a policing career should have the tools to do it effectively for the protection of themselves and the public," says Jay Lawrence, another special constable.

He has stopped to chat with Stewart outside the St. Andrew subway station, where he and his partner are dealing with a fare dispute.

Special Constable Danielle Blay accompanies Stewart for part of the subway patrol, offering directions, checking obscure corridors for loiterers, warning a rider tapping on his laptop to hold tight to his belongings.

She loves the job so much, she says, her friends roll their eyes when she starts talking about work.

But she is keenly aware of the danger, too: "The first thing out of my mother's mouth is: `Why do you want to risk your life for a job?'

"It's not going to be the gun call that gets us hurt," says Blay. "It's the smoker we investigate who might have a gun. You have to be vigilant in every situation."

For now, the issue of arming constables is closed, says Andrews, but the emphasis on officer safety remains. "We are in the process of evaluating their activities, the controls we currently have in place, and are there any additional measures that we can implement."

At 7:30 p.m., Stewart gets a call about an unattended backpack at Queen's Park station.

"The worst-case scenario? It's a sarin gas attack, like Tokyo," he says, referring to the 1995 act of terrorism that killed 12 people.

This time it's the best case: a red cooler containing empty beer cans.

Later, Stewart hops into a van to join two constables on the Bloor line who nabbed two kids entering the subway without paying. Turns out they're from Russia and couldn't read the signs.

Constables Bill Perivolaris and Mohamed Elatter do their best to explain things and send the boys on their way.

Elatter says his job has changed over a decade – "society has changed."

Andrews notes TTC has reacted in kind, installing cameras, creating waiting areas on platforms and letting drivers drop off late-night riders closer to home.

"In the mid-'70s the only security measure we had was the yellow alarm strip on our subway trains."
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Old July 18th, 2008, 04:41 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
The London Underground is safe for the passenger, i've used it for years and have never seen any crime... Of course you get some tossers that try to be intimidating, but you get that above ground, too! You get some rowdy drunks during the weekends, but they're mostly too sozzled to do anything.

There is graffiti but I don't think trains are allowed in service if they've been seriously graffitied, I think it's to stop graffiti 'artists' from getting any pleasure from it.

Buses on the other hand... They just seem to attract more trouble, but it depends on the route.
I saw a very badly graffitied train on the Metropolitan Line and also all the walls that run along the lines when they are in a open cutting seem to be totally covered in some places...but like you say, the actual violent crimes I've never seen...
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Old July 18th, 2008, 05:18 PM   #33
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I think a lot of it is petty crime. The trains would have a lot of witnesses come forward if something really serious happened!
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Old July 19th, 2008, 08:56 PM   #34
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Transit System Crime

Me? I wager Montréal's relatively-recent swelling up of its underground police ranks is related more to fare evasion than to trying to actually turf crime down there once and for all...
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Old September 5th, 2008, 10:29 AM   #35
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Metro police statistics show spike in robberies
6 August 2008

WASHINGTON (AP) - Statistics released by Metro Transit Police show robberies on the Metro system have climbed 38 percent since last year.

Police received 272 robbery reports in the first six months of the year, compared to 197 during the same period last year.

The increase in robbery reports led an increase in the overall crime statistics, however reports of aggravated assaults and attempted motor vehicle thefts decreased slightly.

Metro Deputy Transit Police Chief Jeff Delinski says many of the robberies and thefts involve portable electronic devices such as cell phones and iPods.

Metro has arrested 33 people on robbery charges this year, including 16 juveniles.

------

Information from: The Washington Examiner
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Old September 6th, 2008, 10:20 AM   #36
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hm... Zagreb transport is pretty safe IMO...
there was few attacks on drivers at night lines, but few years ago they put some glass barrier protecting the driver so attacks are very very low...

there are some stealing during rush hour, but i think most of our thieves get caught instantly, could be from inexperience

and on new low-floor trams there are cams inside so pickpocketing is almost impossible now... cams also reduced violence and devastation of interior...
seems that cams have some psychological influence on people...
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Old May 9th, 2009, 07:10 AM   #37
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'Women only' carriages on Beijing subway mulled: state media
5 May 2009
Agence France Presse

A Beijing politician has suggested setting up "women only" subway carriages on the city's crowded public transport system to curb sexual harassment and alleviate overcrowding, state press said Tuesday.

"Beijing's subway is so crowded during rush hour, and women are at a disadvantage in both strength and stature to fight for the limited space," the China Daily quoted Wang Zhuo, a member of an advisory assembly, as saying.

Wang is proposing setting aside the middle carriages for women passengers, elderly people and children due to crowded conditions on the subways, which leads to sexual harassment, the report said.

His proposal is being posted on government websites for public debate, it added.

Up to 3.4 million trips are taken every day on Beijing's crowded subway system, which is expected to be one of the world's most extensive after additional lines are completed in the coming years.

According to a recent survey of 200 Beijing women, 50 percent said it was too difficult to get on the subway, while 30 percent said they had to squeeze into crowded carriages during rush hours, it said.
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Old May 11th, 2009, 07:49 AM   #38
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I disagree that the fare payment system is to blame or even acting as a primary factor as you suggest, because GO Transit, which operates on the exact same system with its trains, doesn't have this problem.

The causes are much more about social issues than managerial mechanics of transit. The honour system is actually vastly preferable to gates because it is great at avoiding bottlenecks and other efficiency problems that inevitably come with a controlled-access fare-paid zone.
GO Transit is completly different from SkyTrain which why I stated SkyTrain crime and no other. Vancouver Commuter Rail {WCE} does not have a crime problem at all as it provides totally different service to a different patron.

SkyTrain crime has EVERTHING to do with its PoP system. Its like a drug/thug express having a station at the DownTown Eastside. I am a volunteer at a communtiy policing station and the stats bear this out. Somone who wants to sell drugs all over or is fleeing the police just jumps on the SkyTrain. They know there will be a train there withing one minute. It is due to the SkyTrain crime that Translink brought in their own Transit police which has been given authority to apprehend a criminal even off transit grounds.
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Old May 11th, 2009, 10:11 AM   #39
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these violence on public transport is disgusting, it puts fear among innocent passengers and when news gets around people are reluctant to NOT Give up use of their private cars.
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Old September 28th, 2009, 06:50 AM   #40
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i know minneapolis buses have had a number of recent shootings. i believe they are startng to install cameras
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