daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > Manchester Metro Area

Manchester Metro Area For Manchester, Salford and the surrounding area.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 26th, 2007, 09:11 PM   #121
Whitworth's Screw
Registered User
 
Whitworth's Screw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 31
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by heatonparkincakes View Post
cheers urbaniser

its been located
Can you tell me where to find it please?
Whitworth's Screw no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old July 27th, 2007, 02:11 PM   #122
heatonparkincakes
Registered User
 
heatonparkincakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,955
Likes (Received): 421

It was in the Economist magazine.

The Cakes's brother says he located a copy in the Manchester Central library, but I downloaded a copy of it from their web page. now whether A is actually A or that A is B and C is well D may be the case, but I put SCottish executive into the economist site and ...

But ist obvious really. By virtue of being a capital city (with its bureaucracy, parliament and its associated lobbists), generate a great deal of internal business that is paid for by the rest of the country.

The same debate goes on in Barcelona about Madrid, in Cork about Dublin, Marseille in Paris.
heatonparkincakes está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2007, 03:22 PM   #123
Whitworth's Screw
Registered User
 
Whitworth's Screw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 31
Likes (Received): 0

But part of a wider policy debate to do with regional spending in the UK. Currently, London is increasing its share of public sector spending, due to well expressed arguments about being the key driver of the economy, and also having greatest need due to high congestion, even more unaffordable housing than in other parts of the UK, and some severe pockets of socio-economic deprivation.

However, there's a counter argument; one which needs to be expressed more effectively to government by organisations like the Core Cities Group. London is overheating in terms of much of its economy and certainly in terms of demographics. It's becoming prohibitively expensive to patch up the problems (e.g. £14bn for Crossrail) and the only sustainable long-term alternative solution is to develop other cities (e.g. Manchester) as key drivers of the UK economy; cities which outperform European competitors. But without the necessary investment, cities like Manchester will continue to languish way down the league in terms of GDP per capita.

I could go on, but have a meeting.
Whitworth's Screw no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2007, 08:08 PM   #124
jrb
10th February 2008
 
jrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 31,923
Likes (Received): 3477

University spin-out makes China connection
Sheryl Moore
31/ 7/2007

A UNIVERSITY spin-out company that monitors high-voltage cables is plugging into overseas markets.

Manchester-based Independent Power Engineering Consultants (IPEC) was spun out of Manchester University's engineering department in 1995.

Its technology is being used by the Taiwanese Power Corporation and the group is now signing deals in China.

IPEC, which will see turnover top the £1m mark this year, is also looking at opportunities in Poland, Czech Republic, Romania and Hungary.

Commercial director Patrick Fleming says: "UK Trade and Investment put us in touch with Chinese contacts and provided support in the form of translators and copies of our literature in Chinese. They helped us identify the right power companies and technical experts, as well as putting us in touch with a government cable testing laboratory in Shanghai.

"Dealing with bureaucracy in China can be very difficult, but UKTI helped us to quickly find the key people and organise meetings, saving us time and money, and we have now signed our first contracts in China."

The company has two cutting edge pieces of technology to solve problems for the electricity supply industry.

Its ultrasense application is a quality control monitor used in the manufacture of extra high-voltage cables, while IPEC's ASM application monitors existing underground electricity cables.
jrb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2007, 08:09 PM   #125
jrb
10th February 2008
 
jrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 31,923
Likes (Received): 3477

Pochin's back in city centre

31/ 7/2007

CHESHIRE-based Pochin 's Group has decided to open an office in central Manchester.

It is the latest regional dev-eloper to decide Manchester is too important to ignore. North Wales based David McLean Developments announced last week that it, too, would be opening a Manchester office.

Pochin's has acquired an office in a joint venture with Liverpool-based UK Land and Property on Bridge Street, Manchester.

St Andrew's House, off Deansgate, comprises 6,000 sq ft of office accommodation over four storeys.

The property has been completely refurbished, with Arabian Air taking the ground floor and Pochin's on the first floor.

Jim Nicholson, director of Pochin Developments, comments: "We recognised the ever-increasing importance of having a base once again in the city centre and look forward to increasing our activity in the city centre and beyond."

Drivas Jonas is the letting agent for the building.
jrb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2007, 08:11 PM   #126
jrb
10th February 2008
 
jrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 31,923
Likes (Received): 3477

Leading the way to trade links
Kevin Feddy
31/ 7/2007

BUSINESS leaders met one of Pakistan's most senior politicians during his visit to Manchester.

They discussed trade and investment opportunities with Minister for Commerce Humayun Akhtar Khan.

Mr Khan, who has held the portfolio since 2002, is credited with spearheading business and commercial reforms during an economic turnaround in Pakistan.

The UK is one of the biggest exporters of to Pakistan and the third largest investor. Exports from Britain to Pakistan rose from £464m in 2005 to £489m in 2006.

Clive Drinkwater, the north west regional director of UK Trade & Investment, said: "The minister highlighted the opportunities that exist for UK companies in Pakistan, particularly in areas such as power generation, financial services such as banking and insurance, and in retail following the deregulation of these sectors. Makro and Carrefour are both opening stores there.

"He particularly welcomed UK companies that will help to develop Pakistan's own exports."

The minister met delegations from Greater Manchester Chamber and pro.manchester.

Mr Drinkwater added: "We were delighted that the minister chose to visit the north west, building on the relationships developed during our visit to Pakistan last November and the recent delegaton from Lahore Chamber of Commerce."
jrb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 16th, 2007, 05:58 PM   #127
URBANISER
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 610
Likes (Received): 0

Even the London establishment are revealing the obvious! From todays Telegraph.

Roy Keane's lament about the retail fixations of the wives and girlfriends of football players illuminates a wider truth.

Complaining that players were refusing to sign for his club because their wives "want to go shopping in London", the Sunderland manager has identified one of the root causes of this country's structural imbalance.

The powerful centripetal pull towards the capital has long distorted the British economy. We would be far healthier economically and socially if we were not so bottom-heavy. The reason we are is that it is not only Wags who want to live, and shop, down south.

advertisement
For the best part of 40 years, since the decline of heavy industry, the regions have struggled. Over the same period, the City of London has become the motor of the British economy. The result has been an overheated South East and tepid rest of the country.

Successive governments have stroked their chins and pondered schemes for redressing the balance, to little avail. Their own modest efforts at decentralising through sending civil servants to provincial centres regularly run into fierce resistance. Whitehall's finest regard a placement in Newport or Newcastle as a one-way ticket to the salt mines.

Ministers are experiencing what we all know: you cannot buck the market. The answer to our southern tilt is not grandiose regional plans that try to make water flow uphill. It is to make living outside the South East more attractive than living in it.

There is plenty of scope here. House prices in the Home Counties are prohibitive; the transport system is a disgrace; public services are under intolerable pressure. In short, the living may be rich, but it is far from easy.

This is where the regions can score. With plentiful, affordable housing and access to wide open spaces, the quality of life can be immeasurably better.

With the right infrastructure - better transport links, universal broadband access, regional airports with full international schedules - people would head north and west, and with them, jobs.

Who knows? One day, Wags may be as happy shopping on Wearside as in Knightsbridge
URBANISER no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2007, 06:33 PM   #128
jrb
10th February 2008
 
jrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 31,923
Likes (Received): 3477

Knowledge capital slowly taking shape.

Futurology:2008

To mark the 60th anniversary of the world’s first computer, independent trade association Manchester Digital is proposing to stage a huge global technology conference to take place in Manchester next autumn.



To be called Futurology: 2008 Manchester UK, the event will bring together high profile speakers from across the world to discuss the latest in futurology – what technology has in store for us in the future.



The four-day event - to be held in annually in Manchester - is aimed at a wide range of industry sectors across the North West, the UK and the rest of the world. It will be first conference of its kind in the UK.



The conference is inspired by TED, a large futurology conference held annually in the United States which attracts global speakers like Bill Clinton, Al Gore and Bono. High demand for delegate places sees the event five times oversubscribed.



Futurology: 2008 Manchester UK will be unlike a conventional conference, addressing issues in a unique way and offering an interactive experience for delegates. A fringe event will allow every delegate to suggest a topic for discussion during the conference and all delegates will have the opportunity to speak or make a presentation. Importantly, all blogs and records of the conference events and presentations will be made available for free on the internet.



Manchester Digital is thought to be the largest self-funded independent digital and new media trade association in Europe, with 260 members.



Mike Ryan, Company Secretary at Manchester Digital and founder of digital solutions business Idaho Technology said: “As the birth place of the modern computer it is natural that a conference about futurology should take place in Manchester.



“We have already secured partners including M.I.T professors and expect the conference to be a huge boost to the region and the city’s digital sector, raising Manchester’s profile and global connections.”



Shaun Fensom, Chair of Manchester Digital said: “Technology is entering all aspects of our lives - in business and leisure - and the pace of technological change is getting faster. The Futurology conference gives us a chance to get the bigger picture - share insight across all areas of business and society and discuss how the future will affect us. We have scoured the globe for the best thinkers, speakers and innovators and will address a range of issues.”



The Futurology conference will also underline Manchester’s position as a UK hub for the new media and digital industries.



Colin Sinclair, Chief Executive at MIDAS said: “Manchester has historically been a recognised centre for innovation and technology and has developed a thriving new media and digital industry. We believe that the future of this sector is critical for the city region and welcome the futurology conference, which will further enhance Manchester’s reputation as a global hub for the digital sector.”



As an organisation run by its members, for its members Manchester Digital is interested in ideas, input and suggestions to ensure a stimulating event for everyone both in 2008 and beyond.



We are actively looking for members to assist or suggest sponsors who will help make this an event to remember. If you are able to help or have a sponsor in mind please contact John Keys and he will discuss how you can help.



MORE INFORMATION WILL BE RELEASED THROUGH THIS SITE AS THE EVENT TAKES SHAPE.

http://www.manchesterdigital.com/default.asp
jrb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 21st, 2007, 01:42 PM   #129
Jerv
Registered User
 
Jerv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 2,056
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by URBANISER View Post
universal broadband access
Oh my God, they get broadband oop that north aswell? What next, civilization?
Jerv no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2007, 12:34 PM   #130
URBANISER
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 610
Likes (Received): 0

From the BBC article posted by Skyhigh. 'Manchester's 19 million square foot of office space compares with Liverpool's 3-4 million'.
This is a staggering commercial/economic difference. If you look at it logically taking population size into account to match Manchester, Liverpool should have about 11-12m sqf. This output differential is really huge in terms of economic performance.
URBANISER no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2007, 12:39 PM   #131
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

Wonder if that Manchester figure includes Salford, Trafford etc which I bet have all on their own are similar to the Liverpool figure.

Wasn't Spinningfields 4m sq ft on it's own?
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2007, 04:34 PM   #132
URBANISER
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 610
Likes (Received): 0

Metro... I actually posted some data on this a while back, can't find it. Anyway your right, Manchester connurbation had 32m and the City centre was 19m. Leeds 2nd Brum 3rd. Liverpool was way down the list below Cardiff. The question is, where do people actually work in Liverpool?
URBANISER no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2007, 05:00 PM   #133
the golden vision
Registered User
 
the golden vision's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,477
Likes (Received): 835

Quote:
Originally Posted by URBANISER View Post
Metro... I actually posted some data on this a while back, can't find it. Anyway your right, Manchester connurbation had 32m and the City centre was 19m. Leeds 2nd Brum 3rd. Liverpool was way down the list below Cardiff. The question is, where do people actually work in Liverpool?
A better question would be where do all the people work in Manchester? The city of Manchester emoploys 310,000 ,city of Liverpool 235,000. The city centres:120,000 Manchester,90,000 Liverpool.So i wouldn't read too much in office space.
the golden vision no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2007, 07:59 PM   #134
URBANISER
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 610
Likes (Received): 0

gv... I read that the Twin Towers housed more workers than Liverpool city centre (50000). It was a fact also quoted on one of the BBC reports after the attack of 9/11. Your figures would also indicate that Liverpool has a bigger economic output than Manchester per head of population. As Manchester is the biggest economic driver in the UK outside London thats great for the N West economy.
URBANISER no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2007, 08:20 PM   #135
the golden vision
Registered User
 
the golden vision's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,477
Likes (Received): 835

Quote:
Originally Posted by URBANISER View Post
gv... I read that the Twin Towers housed more workers than Liverpool city centre (50000). It was a fact also quoted on one of the BBC reports after the attack of 9/11. Your figures would also indicate that Liverpool has a bigger economic output than Manchester per head of population. As Manchester is the biggest economic driver in the UK outside London thats great for the N West economy.
Not at all,similar populations,450k.The city centre figure 2005,90.000.I take stats from the media with a pinch of salt.In fact i think the Liverpool office figure is around 10m sq ft.Incidentally as regards Manchester,it all depends which "Manchester" you are referring to,as you know Midas says Manchester when it means GM. The city of Manchester employs 310,000,city of Liverpool 235,000.
the golden vision no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 24th, 2007, 08:36 AM   #136
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

'Manchester' has vast swaths of office development across the conurbation.

Outside the city centre we have the M60 cresecent from Stockport, passed the airport through Alty, Sale and Trafford Park which must be a huge economic driver for the area.

We also have Salford Quays which are most likely not classed as city centre.

Wonder if any web site actually has definative figures.

From memory, some company that sells office space in the different regions did a report no so long ago providing details of how much office space was in the cities in the UK, Manc came out on average about £310/sq ft in the city centre, only below some parts of London, then Bristol, then Brum.... with Liverpool proping up the list at arounf £180/sq ft.

May try and dig out the article later - but yes, there are vast differences in the economies of the places, you just have to look at the GDP for the cities.
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 24th, 2007, 10:04 AM   #137
and-r
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,304
Likes (Received): 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by the golden vision View Post
Not at all,similar populations,450k.The city centre figure 2005,90.000.I take stats from the media with a pinch of salt.In fact i think the Liverpool office figure is around 10m sq ft.Incidentally as regards Manchester,it all depends which "Manchester" you are referring to,as you know Midas says Manchester when it means GM. The city of Manchester employs 310,000,city of Liverpool 235,000.
i think you guys need to read between the lines a little bit, its not really that suprising that the employment figure for central liverpool is 90,000 it is still the centre of a conurbation of around 1.4 million people and liverpool has a massive civil servant workforce, nationally with the revenue and customs and criminal records HQs and the passport office for northern england but after that there is only really the royal assurance group as a major city centre employer with shops, accountants, law firms etc making the rest of the figure. manchester is not the capital of the north west just by virtue of how many jobs there are but also their nature, it is home to large parts of the back offices of major banks such as rbs etc. it has a very strategic location for attracting higher end employment as it is essentially central to the entire of northern england with people able to commute easily from liverpool, leeds and sheffield not to mention countless other small towns and cities, i would expect the figure for manchester city centre to increase significantly over the next few years (depending on uk and worldwide economic factors of course) think of all the major office developments that are only just being completed or in development
and-r no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 24th, 2007, 10:06 AM   #138
and-r
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,304
Likes (Received): 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metrolink View Post
Manc came out on average about £310/sq ft in the city centre, only below some parts of London, then Bristol, then Brum.... with Liverpool proping up the list at arounf £180/sq ft.

May try and dig out the article later - but yes, there are vast differences in the economies of the places, you just have to look at the GDP for the cities.
i think you mean £31/sq ft compared to £18/sq ft
and-r no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 24th, 2007, 11:21 AM   #139
the golden vision
Registered User
 
the golden vision's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,477
Likes (Received): 835

Quote:
Originally Posted by and-r View Post
i think you guys need to read between the lines a little bit, its not really that suprising that the employment figure for central liverpool is 90,000 it is still the centre of a conurbation of around 1.4 million people and liverpool has a massive civil servant workforce, nationally with the revenue and customs and criminal records HQs and the passport office for northern england but after that there is only really the royal assurance group as a major city centre employer with shops, accountants, law firms etc making the rest of the figure. manchester is not the capital of the north west just by virtue of how many jobs there are but also their nature, it is home to large parts of the back offices of major banks such as rbs etc. it has a very strategic location for attracting higher end employment as it is essentially central to the entire of northern england with people able to commute easily from liverpool, leeds and sheffield not to mention countless other small towns and cities, i would expect the figure for manchester city centre to increase significantly over the next few years (depending on uk and worldwide economic factors of course) think of all the major office developments that are only just being completed or in development
I don't need to read between any lines.Firsly it's only inb the last 25 years that Manchester has overtaken Liverpool in finance/banking so don't be getting carried away.Until the late 70's Liverpool was still the second financial sector in England and at one time it's commercial district employed 70,000 dwarfing Manchester,so a little bit of context wouldn't go amiss. Manchester has seen a huge increase in it's finance sector while Liverpool's has contracted significantly.It's only now that the inward investment agencies in Liverpool are targeting the finance sector and remember as regards public sector Manchester has 95% of regional jobs BBC etc,maybe i've hit a raw nerve,Manchester isn't the powerhouse some of you think it is and certainly isn't and never will be any capital.
the golden vision no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 24th, 2007, 11:35 AM   #140
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

No, Manchester is no financial capital, however, it is still quite strong for provinsial Britain.

http://www.colliers.com/Content/Atta...hesterReport07[2].pdf

Quote:
Located at the very heart of the UK,
Manchester is the largest and fastest
growing regional centre, second only to
London in the number of international
commercial transactions taking place.
Greater Manchester has a population of
over 2.5 million residents with a workforce
of 1.2 million. It lies at the heart of one of
the country's largest conurbations and acts
as the main commercial and administrative
centre of the North West. With around 80
of the Financial Times Top 100 companies
and more than 60 banking institutions
(40 from overseas), Manchester generates
nearly a third of the region's wealth equal to
Leeds, Liverpool and Sheffield combined.
The BBC employ 700 people at present, and will employ 2,000 in 2011 hardly a huge number.

Quote:
The Financial and Professional sectors have seen the
biggest acceleration of economic growth within the
North West, with Manchester accounting for 60% of
the regional output. Therefore, it is no wonder that the
last 12 months has seen the Financial sector dominate
take-up figures, accounting for 30% of take-up, closely
followed by the Professional sector taking 23%. The
Manchester office market is becoming less reliant on
Public Services, with this sector accounting for 18% of
take-up, although the signs are that this will increase in
2007/8.
However, Government mandate is now insisting that
any Government occupier, prior to taking new offices,
gives serious consideration to vacant Government
stock in any given City. Compared to other Cities,
Manchester has a relatively low level of existing
Government stock,
but with over 120,000 sq ft
available it does represent somewhat of a threat to
some newer developments hoping to attract Public
Sector occupiers. However, what will prove interesting
will be the emphasis placed on a sustainable working
environment versus the need to look at existing
Government buildings, which, due to age and
condition, are far from environmentally sustainable.
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu