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Old March 21st, 2007, 07:49 AM   #121
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Oh well.
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Old March 21st, 2007, 03:18 PM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
^ I am ALL FOR preservation of nature! Oh my GOD
Referring to wetlands as a "bunch of swamps" (when often times there is no standing water in wetlands at all) and implying that the wetland restoration would be undesirable by listing several items as desirable in an urban setting came across to me like you were not supportive of this project, or wetlands in an urban area in general.

Places like Boston Commons, Grant Part, Central Park etc. bring in lots of visitors as they are not retail, mass transit, etc (and I know those examples are extreme), but they bring in a lot of people.

It was your negativity in your post that gave off the vibe that you are unsupportive of this project where environmentalists are creaming their pants over the prospect of having this massive of a wetland restoration and enhancement project in an urban area.
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Old March 21st, 2007, 06:42 PM   #123
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Chicago is so large in area, especially the south side that I think this is a great idea, we seem to forget what Chicago is and was before it become a city, it has alot of ecosystems still in it are not found much anywhere, like prairie, oak savannas and wetlands. this wetland restoration is a great idea,
look at newyorkcity, alot of it is wetlands, what is surrounding broad channel?

I may be wrong but i dont think Illinois has alot of wetlands.

Taken from the Illinois DNR website.

Total Wetlands
Southern Illinois currently contains 49 percent (approximately 612,300 acres) of the state's total wetland resources. Twenty-nine percent (approximately 357,900 acres) are located in central Illinois. Northern Illinois, once home to a vast amount of the state's wetland acreage, now only contains the remaining 22 percent (approximately 283,500 acres) (Suloway and Hubbell 1994).

Unfortunately, the actual damage to the historic wetland resource is greater than these figures reflect. Only 917,765 acres (approximately three-fourths) of the currently existing wetlands can be considered natural wetlands. The other 336,126 acres (one-fourth) of the wetlands have been modified or created by dikes, impoundments, or excavation activities. These additional figures reveal Illinois has actually lost over 90 percent of its original presettlement wetlands
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Old March 21st, 2007, 06:46 PM   #124
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More from the Illinois DNR website

NATIONWIDE STATUS

Wetland loss is a common trend throughout the entire country. At the time of Colonial America, the area that now constitutes the United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) contained an estimated 392 million acres of wetlands. Over the course of 200 years, however, 22 of the 50 states have lost over 50 percent of their original wetland acreage. The conterminous 48 states collectively have lost approximately 116 million acres (over 53 percent) of their presettlement wetlands.

This means that on average, in the lower 48 states between the 1780s and 1980s wetlands were lost at a rate of over 60 acres/hour. Figure 3-5 compares wetland loss in Illinois with the entire United States (Dahl 1990).

When compared with other states, the scope of wetland loss in Illinois becomes more clear. Illinois ranks sixth in overall percentage of wetland loss, behind California, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, and Ohio. In terms of acres of wetland loss, Illinois ranks fifth. Only Florida, Texas, Louisiana, and Arizona have lost more acres. Because of the large percentage and acreage of wetlands that have been lost, Illinois is in the top 10 percent of states with the greatest overall wetland loss over the past 200 years (Dahl 1990).
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Old March 22nd, 2007, 06:49 AM   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrintersRowBoiler View Post
Places like Boston Commons, Grant Part, Central Park etc. bring in lots of visitors as they are not retail, mass transit, etc (and I know those examples are extreme), but they bring in a lot of people.
^ This warped logic of yours in seemingly all things is exactly what scares the hell out of me.

What in blazes do the man-made Central Park in Manhattan or Grant Park next to the loop have to do with wetlands in Hegewisch?

Nothing. You cannot infer that tourists will come running to Hegewisch based on the fact that tourists flock Central Park. Sorry buddy.

But yeah, for the sake of the environment, it seems like a lovely idea.
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Old March 22nd, 2007, 07:49 AM   #126
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^ Just because I easily squashed beyond mention your retarded idea about doubling parking in the south loop doesn't mean you'll score any points seeking passive-aggressive revenge by siding with somebody who called me ignorant (oh, and he kindly apologized for it too, if you haven't noticed). Get over it.
I didn't even think about our disagreement about parking when writing my post. I don't hold grudges over people on these boards.... I enjoy discussing development in the city on these boards, even when I strongly disagree with people. I got over it... why can't you just get over the fact that someone on this board does not agree with you?

I might have called you ignorant... but that should not be taken as an insult. Most people are ignorant to the importance of wetlands. However, using the word retarded is insulting to me... I really don't like that word as it puts down people with disabilities.

I am not trying to get revenge on you... what is your deal? I am not trying to side with anyone here... just nature. I am very passionate about wetlands (I have even read a couple wetland books in the last couple of years) and am very involved with wetlands in my line of work.

I am not trying to "pick fights" on this board. I just want to have good discussion about development and maybe open some eyes to real issues that are both educational and beneficial to everyone.

I mentioned the man-made parks (which I might consider enhancement of nature, just like they are doing in Hegewisch) because I was making a point that parks (like the park/recreational area they will build in Hegewisch) can draw people and not just stores and public transit.
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Old March 22nd, 2007, 07:50 AM   #127
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I grew up in Hegewisch and would love nothing more then to see it as the thriving neighborhood it once was. However, I can't see how making the wetlands into a tourist destination would have such a major effect on Hegewisch.

I've always been for the idea of preserving the wetlands, but it is the wetlands themselves that are somewhat responsible for the condition of Hegewisch today. It's the most isolated neighborhood in the city because of the harbor and wetlands. Now this was fine when the factories were chugging along. The neighborhood was completely independent. That's not the case today.

I would like to see a good mix of perservation along with high-tech industries. This could be a proving ground for green technology as it relates to industry and manufacturing. I think 80% of the are should be used as parkland, but you could use the Torrence Ave corridor as an industry zone. This would help breath life back into Hegewish.

A transit line to the other south side neighborhoods would help as well. The South Shore line already provides great access to downtown. An L line (maybe using Torrence and Stony Island up to the University) would be a great benefit if high tech industry were to develop there.
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Old March 22nd, 2007, 08:14 AM   #128
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It makes sense to me that the area could evolve into an eco-tourist zone, on a day-tripping scale of course.

The whole Lake Calumet/Wolf Lake region in which Hegewisch lies has the potential, if cleaned up properly, to evolve into something quite important for the city-

http://illinois.sierraclub.org/calum...ery/index.html
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Old March 27th, 2007, 06:30 PM   #129
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Real info on Southworks :)

http://www.suntimes.com/business/313...Solo27.article

Planned Southworks project picks up Solo site

March 27, 2007


A city-within-the-city, featuring residential, retail and high-tech commercial development would rise on a nearly-600-acre site at the former U.S. Steel mill if a South Side development company can fulfill its vision.

Southworks Development LLC said Monday it bought Solo Cup Co.'s bedeviled 118-acre site at 87th Street and the lakefront, adjacent to nearly 400 acres already controlled by Southworks.

Said Daniel McCaffery, a key mover behind the plan, "The development will change the face of the entire Southeast Side of Chicago."

Preliminary plans call for:

• • A major shopping center.

• • A variety of housing options including senior living, single family and town houses as well as high- and mid-rise multifamily units.

• • Institutional uses such as education, research, biomedical and high-technology facilities.


The transaction is expected to close Nov. 30, and the sale for an undisclosed amount has been approved by the City of Chicago, which conducted a detailed review of the proposed redevelopment plans for the site, Southworks said.

Southworks Development is a joint venture between Chicago's McCaffery Interests, and two Philadelphia real estate players, Lubert Adler Funds and Westrum Development. Lubert Adler would be the financier and Westrum has signed as an operating partner.

Westrum Development CEO John Westrum said, "With more than a mile of waterfront and the addition of more than 115 acres to Chicago's lakefront parks, this will be a magnificent setting in which to build a residential community."

The Solo Cup site has been a source of disappointment since the company acquired the land from U.S. Steel in 2001. Plans to build a new factory on the site ran aground on an ill-advised acquisition of Sweetheart Cup Co., a glut of inventory and a staggering debt load.

Instead of building new, Solo Cup expanded a facility at 7575 S. Kostner and has been vainly searching for a buyer for the U.S. Steel site since.

Solo Cup CEO Robert M. Korzenski said, "We have arrived at a solution for this property that is a win-win for everyone. We are very pleased the land will now be put to its best possible use."
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Old March 28th, 2007, 09:04 PM   #130
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http://www.globest.com/news/872_872/.../159266-1.html

Lowe’s Purchases 11 Acres at New Power Center
By Gina Kenny
CHICAGO-Lowe’s has purchased an 11.5-acre parcel at the Chatham Market, a 50-acre site being developed into a 420,000-sf power center by a joint venture of Archon Group LP and Monroe Investment Partners LLC, based here. The sales price was not disclosed. Lowe’s will construct a 117,000-sf store and will be one of the anchors of the development.
The area was the site of a former steel plant and is near the Dan Ryan Expressway. As part of the development, a four-lane road will be constructed that will connect 83rd Street to 87th Street, according to a company statement. The Lowe’s will have frontage on the newly constructed street, called Holland Road. Curt Bailey, director of retail investments at the Chicago regional office of Archon, did not return a phone call for comment.

The first phase of the development is expected to open at the beginning of the fourth quarter. The power center, which will have an additional anchor tenant besides Lowe’s, will have retailers from 15,000 sf to 45,000 sf. There will also be ground leases for six pad sites. Archon’s Chicago office and Tartan Realty are coordinating the leasing of Chatham Market. Doug Reichl with Tartan Realty represented Lowe’s.

The Lowe’s will be the second in the city of Chicago and the 21st location in the greater Chicago metropolitan area. Lowe’s plans to open 150 to 160 stores this year, in line with the 155 that opened in 2006. The retailer will also enter Canada during this year’s second half, and executives have said the 1,385-unit chain still has the potential for 2,000 domestic stores.
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Old March 28th, 2007, 10:28 PM   #131
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http://online.wsj.com/article/SB117504655261651237.html

In Inner-City Chicago,
'Metropolis' Hopes to Rise
By RYAN CHITTUM

March 28, 2007

Most mixed-use projects get built in trendy city neighborhoods or tony suburbs. Quintin E. Primo III plans to put his on land previously occupied by some of Chicago's most-impoverished housing projects.

The development, to be called Metropolis, will be built in two phases and will cost about $500 million -- a lot of money for a neighborhood that's been down on its luck for 50 years.

But where most developers might see high crime and dilapidated surroundings, Mr. Primo, a newcomer to commercial real-estate development, sees opportunity. "The argument is unassailable that there is significant buying power concentrated in these minority communities that remains untapped," says Mr. Primo, chief executive of Capri Capital Partners LLC, a real-estate-investment firm that manages about $3 billion in assets.

The shell of a housing project stands across from the Metropolis site.
Mr. Primo's passion notwithstanding, some wonder whether the project can succeed. "You really have to reassure the retailers that the market will be there," says Rachel Weber, an urban-planning professor at the University of Illinois-Chicago.

The project's backers hope to do just that. Metropolis was designed by blue-chip architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP, known for working on the buildings that dominate Chicago's skyline: the Sears Tower and the John Hancock Center. The first phase will feature 330,000 square feet of retail space and 102 condominiums. A planned second phase would add a hotel and high-rise condos.

The architect's renderings show a glassy, modern look, a departure from the low-scale stucco found in most contemporary shopping centers. The six-story building has a sprawling rectangular base topped in the middle with tiered, curved floors decorated with windows of multicolored glass.

The design and scope of the development, which will have a grocery store, drug store, restaurants and 20 other shops, says a lot about how some developers envision the future of America's inner cities. In many such neighborhoods, it can be hard to find essentials like groceries and prescription drugs, and residents have to trek elsewhere to make purchases.

But that's changing, in part due to developers such as Mr. Primo. Capri Capital's co-founder and one of the few African-American executives in commercial real estate, he's building Metropolis with partner Judson Investment Co. LLC to fill a vacuum in the community but also to prove that it's possible to make money in poor neighborhoods while stimulating economic activity there.

At Metropolis, 102 condominiums will top 330,000 square feet of retail surrounding a two-acre park.
According to Michael E. Porter, head of the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City, which studies urban economies, average incomes in inner-city communities rose 8%, after adjusting for inflation, from 1992 to 2002. (ICIC defines inner-city areas as those ZIP Codes where poverty is 50% higher, unemployment is 50% higher and median income is 50% lower than the average for the metropolitan area) At the same time, a boom in residential construction is luring black middle-class families with higher incomes.

Yet the number of stores in inner-city communities has shrunk. An ICIC study published in September found that the gap between shopping demand and supply in inner-city neighborhoods in the top 100 U.S. cities is about 35% -- or $42 billion. That means that consumers who live in inner cities satisfy 35% of their shopping needs outside of their communities.

In the Bronzeville neighborhood where Metropolis will be built, the gap is wider. Consumer demand is $399.2 million a year within a mile radius. But 69% of residents' spending is outside the area -- some $275 million a year, according to Claritas Inc., a San Diego marketing-information company.

It wasn't always so in Bronzeville, a historic African-American neighborhood created by the Great Migration of blacks from the South in the early 1900s, and once known as the "Black Metropolis." It was once a vibrant area with shops and music clubs that was also home to jazz pioneer Louis Armstrong, bluesman Muddy Waters, and trailblazing journalist and suffragist Ida B. Wells, among many others. But the neighborhood went downhill after World War II and by the 1950s was racked with poverty, exacerbated by the city's decision to concentrate poor blacks in high-rise housing projects in the neighborhood.

More recently, the area is making something of a comeback. All but a couple of housing projects have been torn down, and mixed-income housing is rising as part of a Chicago plan to fix its abysmal public housing.

Raised in the suburbs as the son of a schoolteacher and the first black Episcopal bishop in Chicago, Mr. Primo, a friend and early supporter of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, speaks of "elevating the disenfranchised," but insists his project is not philanthropy. "It makes great economic sense for hard-nosed, cold-hearted, socially disinterested business organizations to pursue this market," he says.

Mr. Primo, 52 years old, is one of a small number of African-Americans who have broken into big-time commercial real-estate development in part by focusing on communities that long have been off developers' radar. Former basketball legend Earvin "Magic" Johnson, owns Beverly Hills, Calif.-based Johnson Development Corp. and began putting up movie theaters and restaurants in inner cities in 1994.

San Francisco-based MacFarlane Partners, a real-estate investment firm with $12 billion in assets and headed by Victor MacFarlane, has many investments in lower-income minority areas as does Urban America, run by Richmond S. McCoy, which recently closed its second urban fund to buy about $1.4 billion in real estate over the next two years.

To increase the odds that Metropolis will draw from outside the neighborhood, Mr. Primo hired Skidmore and charged the firm with the mission of designing something impressive architecturally. "How many developers in the inner city hire SOM to design their projects?" Mr. Primo says. "Zero?"

"We believed that if designed properly and built properly, we would create a project that would be welcomed by the community and would translate into high-dollar-per-square-foot rents for us and high sales for the retailers," says Mr. Primo, who is also a pianist and composed and performed a jazzy piece for a video presentation of the project.

Even though city politicians are encouraging the new development, navigating Chicago's political minefields hasn't been easy. To win the crucial support of alderman Dorothy Tillman, Mr. Primo included a fountain in the design at her request and also will put in a technology center, giving area residents free access to computers and the Internet.

Gloria Dickson, who works at an animal shelter, lives across the street from the site and says she looks forward to having a new grocery store, since it currently takes her about 30 minutes to walk to the nearest one. But she worries the changes might bring gentrification. "I just hope that doesn't happen so that rents don't rise so high," she says. "I don't want to get pushed out of this area."

While Capri Capital and Judson Investment control part of the site, they still need approval from the Chicago Housing Authority to purchase the rest. Metropolis also has no anchor tenant yet, usually a requirement for retail developers to start a project. "We're prepared to start without an anchor," says Mr. Primo.

"The proof is in the pudding," Mr. Primo says. "We'll see how it all tastes after we're done."
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Old April 11th, 2007, 01:18 AM   #132
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April 19 Plan Commission Agenda

A proposed Residential Planned Development and Lake Michigan and Chicago Lakefront
Protection Application No. 495 submitted by South Shore View, LLC for the property
generally located at 6740-6756 South South Shore Drive. The applicant proposes to
construct a 21-story residential tower with approximately 132 residential dwelling units and
170 off-street parking spaces. The applicant proposes to demolish the “Brydon School”
building at 6740 S. South Shore Drive This building is identified as potentially significant
in the Chicago Historic Resources Survey. (5th Ward)
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Old April 13th, 2007, 10:11 PM   #133
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Heh, i love this thread!

As for that Chinatown hotel on Archer and Clark, I dont see how that rendering fits with the land available. I drive by that land every day and we laught when we saw a sign for a spiffy hotel going up there. There are redline andmetra tracks, its kinda outside chinatown and more near the projects. Yeah its a good idea and concept, I just do not seeing the Imperial Hotel fittin in the spot they say it will go in...
But that stuff going on Canal are beautiful! BTW orange line traks are near Canal and 18th. Between Rosevelt and Halstead there is no orange stop, all they would have to do it build a stop on Canal.

My family used to live East side ( where you can smell the Gary mills every day) near Cal park. You know, where streets are named like Ave. G, Ave. H, etc?
Anything happening arround there? I took route 41 to visit family in the south burbs/Indiana a month or so ago and the East Side looks like is is falling apart. I did still see the house that has goats and chickens in the yard still tho, yay. Any redevelopment in the old closed industrial areas? I know over the border there is wetland development going on. I am very curious to see what is happening in the neighborhood I spend a lot of my childhood in.

Wondering what is happening by 95th on the SE side and Hegwisch? I like the whole idea of making Hegwisch area a nature area, there are already some good parts there like that. I mean what sort of infastructure are they going to implent? How will they improve living there?jobs? Heck, if they just develope it right, I may move to Hegwisch. I dunno most of my family lived(s) or grew up on the south side or south suburbs, i live on the south side, and i would rather hear about what is going there than in northside or some place like hoffman estates.MMM I also find the south shore beautiful....if you take route 41 in Indiana, you will see, lovely buildings, beaches, lakefront!

I heard Lake Calumet area was being turned into a nice wetland development. That would be lovely.

Wondering what is the delay with the Police station on 31st and Halstead? That part of Halstead is just screaming to be revitilized...They sure like to build retirement homes arround here, first on halstead then on Archer (near Arch).
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Old April 29th, 2007, 03:41 AM   #134
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Here's a rendering of 6740 South Shore that BVictor got
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Old May 4th, 2007, 12:48 AM   #135
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http://www.aiachicago.org/events.asp#1628

USX South Works Redevelopment

Wednesday, May 9, 12:00 pm- 1:00 pm

The 118-acre former South Works steel mill on Chicago’s Southeast Side covers an area larger than the Loop. A mixed-use redevelopment would make this one of the City’s largest projects in years. Phil Enquist, FAIA, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, will present a fascinating overview of planning for this site.

This event is sponsored by Regional & Urban Design KC

Learning units: 1.0 LU/HSW

Location: AIA Chicago, 35 East Wacker Drive, Suite 250

Member price: 0 Non-member price: $15.00
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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:07 AM   #136
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^ That's nice and all, but they've been talking about this damn thing for at least 2 years, if not longer. For the love of God, it's like we're building the Circle Line or something
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Old May 4th, 2007, 07:44 AM   #137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
^ That's nice and all, but they've been talking about this damn thing for at least 2 years, if not longer. For the love of God, it's like we're building the Circle Line or something
I could be wrong, but I think they may have already started construction on one or more of the buildings. I remember someone posting pictures a few months ago....however, it was surprising as apparently the project has not been formally approved by the city.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 12:43 PM   #138
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U. of. C. gets $35 million gift for art center

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed

U. of. C. gets $35 million gift for art center

By Charles Storch
Tribune staff reporter
Published May 3, 2007, 11:17 PM CDT

A Chicago investment banker and his family are giving $35 million to the University of Chicago for a planned $100 million arts center that is to serve the campus and its South Side neighbors.

The gift by David and Reva Logan and their family is one of the larger single donations made to the U. of C. and is the biggest earmarked for the arts there, the university said Thursday.

University President Robert Zimmer said the donation "will enable us to proceed with the building in an expeditious way." He said the center, eyed for the south end of the campus, is expected to be a "transformative facility" for the school, widely known as a bastion for Nobel Prize-winning research in economics and science.

The Center for the Creative and Performing Arts is to be named for the octogenarian couple, who met while attending the U. of C.

David Logan received his undergraduate and law degrees there. Reva Logan delayed her education because of their marriage but later completed her degree at Roosevelt University and became a teacher.

David Logan is managing partner of Chicago-based Mercury Investments. He also is a stalwart advocate for the arts in Illinois and was on the Illinois Arts Council from 1976 to 2006. His wife's family also has been active in the arts: Her brother Allan Frumkin was a prominent gallery owner here and in New York. The couple collect photography and artists' illustrated books.

David Logan said he and his family approached the U. of C. about the donation. He said he was asked whether they would like to fund a theater or some other piece of the center. He replied that he wanted to do something far more ambitious.

He said he was making the gift for his wife, who is in declining health, and in memory of his mother. David Logan's mother wanted her son, who grew up in the Humboldt Park neighborhood and used to pal around with Saul Bellow, to go to the best school possible.

"I have been amazed at what I have been able to do in philanthropy and work," he said. "It's a great tribute to America."

In addition to the arts, the Logans have donated to education, religious, scientific, journalism and community causes here and around the country.

The arts center has been proposed for a site at 60th Street and Ingleside Avenue. It would be south of the Midway Plaisance and on the same block as the Midway Studios, where sculptor Lorado Taft once worked.

It is to include a multipurpose performance hall, three small theaters, music practice rooms and a recording studio and will serve students, faculty and Hyde Park residents.

Five prominent architectural teams are vying for the commission, and one is to be selected later this spring, Zimmer said. The center is expected to be completed in 2011.

[email protected]



Copyright © 2007, Chicago Tribune

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Old May 4th, 2007, 10:28 PM   #139
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AWESOME news. I had reported in the Chicago Gen. thread in SSP but I say it here too: I was in touch with someone at the University and they indicated that a design architect has been selected and that drawings, renderings, etc., will be release sometime in early June. I will post once I get something.
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Old May 5th, 2007, 07:40 PM   #140
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http://www.nearwestgazette.com/Archi...story0507b.htm

Metropolis development coming to Bronzeville

By Christine Mangan


Capri Capital Partners LLC has announced a joint venture with Judson Investment Co. to develop The Metropolis, a mixed-use building that will be located at the intersection of south State Street and Pershing Road.

Capri expects the proposed building will bolster economic development in Bronzeville and Grand Boulevard and generate both temporary construction jobs and permanent employment.

“Beyond economic development for the community, the ultimate design intent for Metropolis is to create a city center for the Near South Side of Chicago,” said Quintin E. Primo III, Capri’s chairman and CEO. “Importantly, the project addresses the chronic lack of commercial retail in the area and will offer market rate and affordable housing to the growing community.”

Primo said 20% of the 102 condominiums planned for phase one will be set aside for low- and moderate-income buyers.

Although specific retailers have not been named, Capri’s media spokesperson, Trish Hoffman, said the company is looking at the usual amenities, including a grocery store and a clothing store.

According to Todd Caruso, regional head of retail for CB Richard Ellis Group, a commercial real estate firm, “The Metropolis is well positioned between the Roosevelt Road retail corridor north and new retail development occurring on 87th Street south. The lack of retail supply in the general area should allow the project to readily draw shoppers from the surrounding 15 neighborhood communities.”

“This project is important to the South Side, and the numbers speak for themselves,” Capri’s Primo explained. According to MetroEdge, a market research arm of the Local Initiatives Support Corp., "approximately $671 million of the total $909 million in Mid-South consumer expenditures represent 'retail leakage,' or dollars spent by residents outside their community,” Capri explained.

Hugh Williams, president and CEO of Judson Investment Co., noted the building’s historical significance. “As minority-owned firms, Judson and Capri understand that Metropolis sits in the middle of an underserved area in the early stages of a rebirth," Williams said. "It will attract middle and upper income residents who will integrate with existing low-income area residents, who have been denied access to grocery stores and other simple amenities that people want in their neighborhoods.”

A three-phase project, the Metropolis will consist of approximately one million square feet. The initial phase will consist of 500,000 square feet; besides its 102 residential condominiums, it will create a green space surrounded by two six-story curvilinear buildings of steel and glass housing approximately 330,000 square feet of commercial retail space. Future phases call for more residential space and hotel facilities.

The Metropolis also will feature a public venue celebrating African American history, located in the building’s central, curvilinear public park. “It will encourage learning activity and dialogue between the retail spaces and the public," explained Ross Wimer, design partner at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP. "At the corner of State and Pershing, the proposed digital clock tower announces both the new landmark development and the renaissance of the historic Bronzeville/Grand Boulevard neighborhood.”

The firm’s architectural vision for Metropolis is “an abstract expression of Bronzeville’s unique cultural history,” Wimer continued. “The building facades recall the repeated musical patterns of blues and jazz, and the residential unit layouts invoke harmonious rhythms and the ideals of freedom and flexibility.”

Media contact Trish Hoffman said Capri anticipates breaking ground on phase one in fall 2008 and expects that phase will be completed by spring 2010.

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