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Old October 19th, 2007, 07:23 PM   #21
flesh_is_weak
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i remember rescuing a drowning pigeon in front of the conservatory at Temperance Street...i regretted it later coz i got a rash from the dirty water
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Old April 29th, 2008, 01:53 PM   #22
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Bird lovers FLAP to save lives of feathered friends
Program asks residents and businesses to turn off their lights and prevent the deaths of thousands

8 April 2008
The Toronto Star

Michael Mesure says saving birds from flying into buildings at night could be the easiest environmental problem in the world to solve.

"Just flick a switch," he said.

Mesure told a Toronto City Hall audience yesterday that bright lights in buildings are one of the leading causes of bird deaths across North America, laying waste to everything from tiny warblers to large, predatory birds who run into windows.

"If you look at the larger picture of preserving wildlife, it's interesting how people will sooner try to save the lives of the snow leopard or the panda bear on some far-off continent rather than try to conserve the lives of the wood thrush or the Peregrine falcon, which lives right on our doorstep in Toronto," said Mesure, executive director of the Fatal Light Awareness Program, or FLAP.

Councillor Glenn De Baeremaeker (Ward 38, Scarborough Centre) said some of the birds that die each year "are smaller than a cellphone and weigh less than a pack of Trident gum."

Mayor David Miller also was on hand yesterday to help launch the third annual Lights Out Toronto campaign, a program aimed at getting the city's business people and residents to flick their switches at night and reduce the number of bird deaths.

FLAP has been around since 1993 but it still faces a huge problem with birds running into large buildings, both during the day and when they're attracted by bright lights at night, Mesure said.

More than 3,000 birds were picked up by volunteers on Toronto streets last year.

That total is down from 5,500 or so the year before, but Mesure noted that overall bird migration numbers in the city also were down in 2007.

The city of Toronto has passed a set of "bird-friendly" guidelines aimed at helping developers plan safer buildings.

The voluntary program touches on everything from reducing external lighting on buildings to creating smaller openings in air conditioning grates so birds can't fall through.

Miller said that cities in Europe and all over North America have contacted Toronto to find out more about the city's bird protection policies.
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Old March 12th, 2010, 03:59 AM   #23
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Mirrored towers a fatal attraction to birds
March 08, 2010
Toronto Star

Shanta Persaud was standing at the photocopier one morning when she saw a little bird fly directly into a large window on the ground floor of her Scarborough office building. The receptionist ran outside to find the bird on the ground, gasping for its last breath.

It “just hit the glass and fell to the ground. It sounded like a pebble against the glass,” she said. “It’s so sad.” And it wasn’t the first time she’d seen this happen.

For birds migrating through Toronto each spring and fall, the three multi-storey office buildings at 100, 200 and 300 Consilium Place are a death-trap. So much so that last week, the environmental groups Ontario Nature and Ecojustice — formerly the Sierra Legal Defence Fund — initiated a private prosecution against the buildings’ managers under the Environmental Protection Act and the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animal Act.

The buildings, near Highway 401 and McCowan Rd. are covered in mirrored glass and as high as 17 storeys. They stand out in an area with few highrises, making them even more lethal than buildings downtown.

In 2008-2009, more than 800 birds were recovered from the lawns around the buildings, ironic considering that the Building Owners and Managers Association had awarded the complex its “Go Green certificate of achievement” for its environmental practices.

Over the past decade, more than 7,000 birds of 82 species have met harsh, painful deaths after flying into what bird safety advocate Michael Mesure calls “the most reflective glass windows of any building in the city.”

The action against management company Menkes alleges that the building’s reflectivity has caused death and injury to birds, including species in decline, and, with respect to animal cruelty legislation, has put animals in distress.

“If you see these buildings, these are essentially mirrors,” said Ecojustice lawyer, Albert Koehl. “What the birds see is the sky and trees reflected in the windows, and they fly right into them.”

Most daytime collisions actually happen between ground level and the fourth floor.

“Most of these birds die of traumatic injuries such as fractured skulls or broken backs,” Koehl said. The broader issue, he adds, is the decline in migratory birds observed year after year.

The high incidence of bird deaths caused by hitting buildings has been a significant concern for years. The non-profit group Fatal Light Awareness Program has tracked bird deaths in Toronto for more than a decade and initiated campaigns such as Lights Out Toronto to encourage building managers to turn lights off at night. (Nighttime lights confuse and attract birds into office windows.)

But this is the first time the law has been invoked in an attempt to change business behavior. Caroline Schultz, executive director of Ontario Nature, says most companies have refused to take any real action.

“There has been nothing specific in terms of legal action to really force business owners to seriously review the options that are available to them to reduce the problem,” said Schultz. “That’s the reason for doing this private prosecution, because this is the worst building in Toronto in terms of bird deaths every year.

“Opportunities exist to do things to mitigate the problem, and what we really want to do is to set a precedent that business owners have a responsibility under the law to do this,” she said. “It’s not voluntary.”

Menkes is to appear in the Ontario Court of Justice on March 17. The maximum fine under the EPA is $6 million per day for the first offence.

The building owner didn’t respond to numerous calls for comment on the charges or efforts to address the problem.

Toronto is on the migratory path for millions of birds, said Mesure, FLAP’s executive director. The spring migratory period begins next week and will go until the beginning of June. The fall migration runs from August to the end of October.

Mesure has worked on the issue for 20 years, but vividly recalls two “days of hell” at the Consilium towers when it seemed to be “raining birds.” On May 12, 2001, he said, FLAP volunteers recovered more than 500 injured or dead birds in six hours. On a Thanksgiving weekend in 2005, the group picked up 400 birds over two days.

In the past few years, the building managers have made attempts to address the problem. According to Persaud, employees have been told to report falling birds and to turn the lights off and put down blinds at night. They have also tried tactics to scare the birds away, such as hanging large orange balls from surrounding trees, and placing silhouettes of hawks and owls inside the windows.

But Mesure says Menkes has been reluctant to do anything more because the only real solution involves changing the aesthetics of the building.

“The only solution is to create patterns on the outside of the glass, so that the bird interprets the glass as a solid object,” he said. “The argument has always been that (owners) don’t want to change to look of the building.”
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Old March 13th, 2010, 02:25 AM   #24
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I would think that buildings would be more hazardous during the day than at night because of the reflections.
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Old March 13th, 2010, 02:38 AM   #25
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+1. I've had so many birds crash into my windows during the day, even into the windows of my house.
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Old March 14th, 2010, 01:00 AM   #26
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save birds?.....
stupid idea
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Old March 23rd, 2010, 11:26 AM   #27
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Building hit with legal action over deadly avian accidents
9 March 2010
The Toronto Star

Shanta Persaud was standing at the photocopier one morning when she saw a little bird fly directly into a large window on the ground floor of her Scarborough office building. The receptionist ran outside to find the dying bird on the ground.

It "just hit the glass and fell to the ground. It sounded like a pebble against the glass," she said. "It's so sad." And it wasn't the first time she'd seen this happen.

For birds migrating through Toronto each spring and fall, the three multi-storey office buildings at 100, 200 and 300 Consilium Place are a death trap. So much so that, last week, the environmental groups Ontario Nature and Ecojustice - formerly the Sierra Legal Defence Fund - initiated a private prosecution against the buildings' managers under the Environmental Protection Act and the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act.

The towers, near Highway 401 and McCowan Rd., are covered in mirrored glass and are as high as 17 storeys. They stand out in an area with few high-rises, making them more lethal than buildings downtown.

In 2008-2009, more than 800 birds were recovered from the lawns around the complex, ironic considering it was awarded a "Go Green certificate of achievement" for its environmental practices by the Building Owners and Managers Association of Toronto. Go Green certificates are most commonly awarded for energy efficiency.

Over the past decade, more than 7,000 birds of 82 species have met painful deaths after flying into what bird safety advocate Michael Mesure calls "the most reflective glass windows of any building in the city."

Among the birds most commonly injured or killed at the site between 2000 and 2006 were the White-throated Sparrow, the Golden-crowned Kinglet, Nashville Warbler, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Ruby-crowned Kinglet and the Dark-eye Junco.

The action against management company Menkes alleges that the buildings' reflectivity has caused death and injury to birds, including species in decline, and, with respect to animal cruelty legislation, has put animals in distress.

"If you see these buildings, these are essentially mirrors," said Ecojustice lawyer Albert Koehl. "What the birds see is the sky and trees reflected in the windows, and they fly right into them."

Most daytime collisions actually happen between ground level and the fourth floor.

"Most of these birds die of traumatic injuries such as fractured skulls or broken backs," Koehl said. The broader issue, he adds, is the decline in migratory birds observed year after year.

The non-profit group Fatal Light Awareness Program has tracked bird deaths in Toronto for more than a decade and initiated campaigns such as Lights Out Toronto to encourage building managers to turn lights off at night, so as not to attract birds.

Caroline Schultz of Ontario Nature says most firms have refused to take real action.

"There has been nothing specific in terms of legal action to really force business owners to seriously review the options that are available to them to reduce the problem," said Schultz. "That's the reason for doing this private prosecution, because this is the worst building in Toronto in terms of bird deaths every year.

"Opportunities exist to do things to mitigate the problem, and what we really want to do is to set a precedent that business owners have a responsibility under the law to do this," she said. "It's not voluntary."

Menkes is to appear in the Ontario Court of Justice on March 17.

The building owner didn't respond to numerous calls for comment on the charges.

Toronto is on the migratory path for millions of birds, said Mesure, FLAP's executive director. The spring migratory period begins next week and will go until early June. The fall migration runs from August to the end of October.

Mesure has worked on the issue for 20 years, but recalls two "days of hell" at the Consilium towers when it seemed to be "raining birds." On May 12, 2001, he said, FLAP volunteers recovered 500 injured or dead birds in six hours. On a Thanksgiving weekend in 2005, the group picked up 400 birds over two days.

In the past few years, the building managers have made attempts to address the problem. According to Persaud, employees have been told to report falling birds and to turn the lights off and put down blinds at night. They have also tried tactics to scare the birds away, such as hanging orange balls from surrounding trees, and placing silhouettes of hawks and owls in windows.

But Mesure says Menkes has been reluctant to do anything more because the only real solution involves changing the aesthetics of the building.
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Old March 24th, 2010, 05:45 AM   #28
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Yes... I'm sure the company loves having birds fly into the side of their building, thanks activists
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Old March 24th, 2010, 06:21 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FK View Post
Doesnt look too bad.
Thats because thats a silhouette. Once it gets real dark... it may not. Besides, wont it be worse for the birds if they cant see the light? How would they know if a building is there? and, if it happens during the day, what does light have to do with anything
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Old April 1st, 2010, 10:05 AM   #30
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All birds do is poop, why save them? I call HUNTING SEASON in America's hat.
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Old April 1st, 2010, 11:22 AM   #31
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All people do is poop as well. They sometimes kill their own kin, too. I call it hunting season!
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Old November 1st, 2010, 07:07 PM   #32
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Dim the lights, save the birds: US conservationists
23 September 2010
AFP

New York's lit-up skyline, which brightens the nocturnal cityscape delighting residents and tourists alike, is a menace to migrating birds, say ornithologists calling for the lights to be dimmed.

Bird lovers said illuminated buildings confuse migrating birds, who find it hard at night to distinguish between bright electric lights and those of the celestial variety.

During their spring and fall migrations, birds are mostly nocturnal travelers and tall buildings make it difficult for them to chart their course.

"At night, birds use the moon and the star map as a compass," said Dr Susan Elbin, ornithologist and director of conservation for the New York City Audubon society.

"When the sky is overcast or the moon is new, strong artificial lights coming from the city will distract them," she said.

"Any kind of deviation from their flight pattern could mean that the birds get exhausted and crash into something. Or they may just wind up fluttering, waiting to recover, and then take off into a glass pane reflecting the sky," Elbin said.

The Audubon Society is asking New Yorkers to turn off their lights at night during peak migration season, from September 1 to November 1.

It is the fifth year that Audubon has made the request of city officials and residents, and the group boasts a growing list of participants.

Buildings agreeing to hit the dimmer switch this year include some of New York's most iconic, including the Time-Warner Center, Rockefeller Center, and the Chrysler building.
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Old January 3rd, 2011, 06:10 AM   #33
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Highland Park considering bird-friendly architecture for public buildings
29 December 2010

HIGHLAND PARK, Ill. (AP) - The city council in the northern Chicago suburb of Highland Park will soon consider a proposal to require bird-friendly construction for all new city buildings.

City officials tell the Chicago Tribune that if the new law is passed, all future public buildings would be required to incorporate bird-safe architecture that's designed to lower the number of bird collisions with buildings.

Private developers would not be affected, but Highland Park Director of Community Development Michael Blue says he hopes the city's example would influence them as well.

Bird-friendly architecture includes curved windows and awnings, which have been shown to lower the incidences of bird collisions with buildings.

Highland Park is in the flight path of a number of migrating birds that like to follow the Lake Michigan shoreline.

------

Information from: Chicago Tribune
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Old January 4th, 2011, 01:24 AM   #34
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I honestly find it extremely silly to use birds as an excuse. Now if they urged buildings to dim their lights for the sole purpose of saving the city money then I could advocate that...

I have a better idea to stop mass amounts of birds from crashing into buildings without effecting cities beautifully shining night skylines. Each super bright/(?)shiny(?) building should get a couple falcons or the city should get a team of falcons and/or hawks and release them during the night. I'm sure the other birds would learn that they are in unwanted territory and forge a new migrating path or just fly higher...

either that or just say F**k the birds :thumbs up:....
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Old January 5th, 2011, 02:26 PM   #35
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Thank God dinosaurs evolved into birds. Imagine a T-rex slamming into a skyscraper.
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Old March 10th, 2011, 11:54 AM   #36
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Dead-birds issue going to court next month
March 09, 2011
Toronto Star
Curtis Rush


About 2,000 dead migratory birds were on display Wednesday, March 9, 2011, at the Royal Ontario Museum as part of an exhibit by the Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP).

For years, a volunteer group has been trying to get the message out about the migratory birds who die by slamming into the reflective glass of Toronto office buildings each year.

On Wednesday, they took this message to the Royal Ontario Museum, where they laid out close to 2,000 dead migratory birds on a canvas for the public to see.

And next month, they hope the message is further driven home in a Scarborough courtroom.

On April 7, the managers of The Consilium Place office towers in Scarborough will have to answer to charges under the Environmental Protection Act and the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act.

“This could be a precedent-setting case and a conviction could send a message to other businesses,” said Albert Koehl, a lawyer for Ecojustice, which has brought the private charges.

The trial is expected to last six days and fines could be substantial, Koehl said. In addition, a provision could be made to order changes to the glass structure thought to be a prime killer of migratory birds.

The towers, near Highway 401 and McCowan Rd., are covered in mirrored glass and are as high as 17 storeys.

In 2008-2009, more than 800 birds were recovered from the lawns around the complex.

Michael Mesure, 47, executive director of the Fatal Light Awareness Program, said he’s frustrated that existing buildings in Toronto are not being mandated to make design changes to protect birds.

Under the city’s bird-friendly guidelines, new buildings must meet certain performance standards that involve muting reflections and treating glass with density patterns.

The executive director of FLAP said simple adjustments such as visual markings on glass windows can help give birds an alternative point of focus.

At the ROM on Wednesday, spectators watched as volunteers laid down the carcasses of migratory birds — everything from birds of prey to small song birds.

“It breaks my heart,” said Kathy Nosich, who works in the biodiversity program for Ontario Power Generation.

She said the display of birds who met their fate by colliding with glass structures brings home the message.

“Nothing tells this story better,” she said.

Mesure, who began FLAP in 1993, says many people remain “in denial” about the problem of dead birds because they don’t see carcasses lying on the streets and don’t realize the ecological benefits of making sure they survive.

“They eat thousands of insects,” he said.

Staff volunteers like Brian Armstrong, who sold his legal practice several years ago, begin patrols throughout the financial district at 4 a.m., collecting injured and dead birds.

The injured birds are taken to the Toronto Wildlife Centre if the gulls haven’t swooped down and taken them away first.

The migratory bird season begins in a few weeks and runs to June.
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 09:00 AM   #37
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Toronto would save a lot more birds if it controlled the cats instead of dimming the lights. But I guess if it's cute, little kitty vs. evil, capitalist office tower, kitty's off the hook.


[IMG]http://i52.************/9hl99s.gif[/IMG]

Tweety Was Right: Cats Are a Bird’s No. 1 Enemy
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/21/sc...e&ref=homepage
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Old October 19th, 2011, 06:56 PM   #38
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Boston Buildings Go Dark For Lights Out Program
By Todd Gutner, WBZ-TV
September 30, 2011 11:26 PM

BOSTON (CBS) – Here’s a riddle. What’s dark and green all over? It’s the city of Boston as many of the towers which define the skyline are turning off their lights at night.

Jack Clarke of Mass Audubon coordinates the Lights Out program. He explained that the Hancock Tower, for example, starts dimming their architectural lights, and their interior lights above the 20th floor, from 11pm-5am..

This happens twice a year, during the spring and fall migratory bird seasons, when almost four dozen Boston skyscrapers participate.

WBZ-TV’s Todd Gutner reports

“We started out with half a dozen buildings three years ago; two years ago we were at 38 buildings; and tonight we are at 43,” said Clarke.

That’s good news for the birds according to Clarke. Thousands of birds die each year because of the lights when they are making their trek.

“They get caught up and distracted by the tall lit buildings in the Northeast,” explained Clarke. “They circle those buildings and they collide with those buildings, drop from exhaustion, and collide with each other.”

Turning out the lights can make good business sense for building owners. Energy is the largest operating expense for commercial buildings. Reducing power use also helps reduce carbon emissions.

“In this case, what is good for the birds is good for the people, and for all living and breathing creatures,” said Cindy Luppi, an environmentalist with Clean Water Action in Boston.

Cleaner air has real, direct health benefits said Luppi. “That reduction of pollution means that we have less health damage in our neighborhoods. There are fewer asthma attacks. There are also fewer emergency room visits that are the result of respiratory distress,” she added.

Clarke is proud of the program. “We have practically every one of the buildings that are over 20 floors participating. It’s a win-win and it doesn’t cost anything. It’s not a requirement. It’s voluntary.”

The current session of Lights Out will run until the end of October, which is the end of the fall migration season.

There are similar programs in Toronto, Chicago, and New York. Clarke would like to see the entire Northeast participate, stretching across to the Great Lake area.

A study in Chicago found the number of bird deaths dropped by 80% once the lights were tuned off.
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Old October 31st, 2011, 05:52 AM   #39
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An important resource for Chicago wildlife rehabilitation
http://www.examiner.com/animal-advoc...rehabilitation
Excerpt
October 30, 2011

Many Chicagoans aren't aware that a wildlife rehabilitation center is located on the city's lakefront on Northerly Island in the former Meigs Field Terminal Building. The facility is the branch location of Barrington, IL headquartered Flint Creek Wildlife Rehabilitation Center.

According to the center, "The proximity of Northerly Island is of benefit both to the residents of Chicago as well as to the animals we treat. Many injuries are time-sensitive, particularly acute trauma such as head trauma caused when the birds strike the window of Chicago's buildings. Early treatment means higher sucess rates. In fact birds treated at Northerly Island are 9% higher as compared to transporting animals to the suburbs for treatment."

Unfortunately, Flint Creek Wildlife Rehabilitation can't afford to hire a full-time professional staff for its Northerly Island branch location causing the location to focus on stabilizing critically injured birds. Almost all of these injured birds are found on the streets and sidewalks of downtown Chicago. They are migratory birds whose flight takes them through downtown Chicago. Frequently they become confused by the glass windows of skyscrapers and fly into them.

Traumitized birds that must be kept for treatment for longer than one day are transferred to the main facility in suburban Barrington for medical care.

The location is equipped like a modern veterinarian's office. Although the facility has a professional staff, it doesn't have a full-time veterinarian staff. However, it is fortunate in that some of the best veterinarians in Illinois volunteer their time in assisting the center.

Those residents of downtown Chicago who may wish to assist Flintcreek have an opportunity to assist. Each year thousands of birds strike Chicago skyscrapers when migrating through the city. The injured birds fall to the sidewalks and streets below where there is a good chance they will be run over by vehicles, tread upon by humans, or die a slow death from their injuries.

Flint Creek is establishing rescue teams that patrol Chicago Streets during migration times. The work of the rescue teams is important because timely rescue and treatment of the injured birds means that about 90% will survive their ordeal.

*********************************

http://www.flintcreekwildlife.org/
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