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Old June 25th, 2005, 04:17 AM   #241
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Old June 25th, 2005, 08:21 AM   #242
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I don't think a fare-less zone is a good idea, downtown has way too many bums/drug dealers/addicts etc.

SkyTrain is already a free ride to spread crime all over the place

What they really need is automated fare gates in SkyTrain stations!!
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Old June 25th, 2005, 10:01 AM   #243
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Quote:
Originally Posted by en
I don't think a fare-less zone is a good idea, downtown has way too many bums/drug dealers/addicts etc.

SkyTrain is already a free ride to spread crime all over the place

What they really need is automated fare gates in SkyTrain stations!!
I totally agree to this, this is the MOST effective way to prevent DRUGGIES!!!
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Old June 25th, 2005, 09:34 PM   #244
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I was actually thinking about this same thing the other day I was in downtown Vancouver...why would I pay a 1zone fare from Waterfront to Granville?? It's simply not worth it. Some stations in other countries have "tunnels" or underground malls that take you quite far from the actual station (for free).

And for those automated gates...I'd love to see them but Translink is gonna have to do A LOT of changes to their ticket systems...For those who buy tickets it's fine but...what about for the majority of the people [i am assuming] who use monthly passes, U-Pass, and other forms of passes...?? How are they supposed to ge through a automated-machine with those ?? Remember there are no staff at work in most stations to "check" those passes.

While I am at it, I think I am going to criticise about Vancouver's transit.

- Infrequent buses [in suburbs]
- FARE BOXES on buses are 'retarded'...can put in only 1 coin at a time?? And still they count wront!!! [one time I was on a community bus and put in $1.50 for 1 zone...and the screen reads: $4.10...wow thanks...I wonder where that can take me to] Please, do something about that!!!
*In Japan the Bus fare boxes lets you put all the coins in into a slot and counts the amount you put in (error free) in 1 second.
- SKYTRAIN 1: if all the announcements say is next station is: ***, then why bother. Add in some interchange informations...like...change here for 99B or...change here for Expo Line to Surrey...
- SKYTRAIN 2: What's the point of having the Millenium Line overlapping the Expo Line from downtown to New West?? Say you are at Lougheed Station and trying to go to Waterfront...One's first instinct must be to board the train to 'Waterfront' and not "Commercial Drive" then change trains, which is actually the quicker way. (My parents still get confused even after a few years the new line came to service)
* By the way, if this is going to remain, please make clearer announcements as to where the train is actually heading: Commercial Drive or King George. Put an electronic sign in front of the train itself...make an announcement BEFORE the train doors actually open (right now the announcements say "Expo Line to...King George" after you have sat down confortably on the trains)

I have one good thing to say though: Sky train is quite efficient, automated and quite fast...
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Old June 25th, 2005, 10:30 PM   #245
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Yes, the fare boxes, which are fairly new, are one of the worst Translink expenditures of recent times.

I don't think they'll be fully replaced anytime soon though. But at least it sounds like they're perhaps considering augmenting the system with automatic passive passes... I guess RF tags? Currently, it slows down boarding a bit too much.
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Old June 26th, 2005, 03:26 AM   #246
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arashi_1987
* By the way, if this is going to remain, please make clearer announcements as to where the train is actually heading: Commercial Drive or King George. Put an electronic sign in front of the train itself...make an announcement BEFORE the train doors actually open (right now the announcements say "Expo Line to...King George" after you have sat down confortably on the trains)

I have one good thing to say though: Sky train is quite efficient, automated and quite fast...
Regarding the electronic signs, they are TOTALLY STUPID, it should display the time when the next train arrives way in advance of it arriving at the station. Currently all it does is once actually see the train approaching the station (with your own eyes), and it puts a retarded message like "Expo Line Train to...." and it can't even fit all the text on one "window".

SkyTrain is a good system, but its managed and run very poorly by Translink.
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Old June 26th, 2005, 07:55 AM   #247
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June 22, 2005
TransLink and four municipalities finalize Golden Ears Bridge agreement

The Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority (TransLink) Board of Directors today authorized TransLink to sign a master municipal agreement with the City of Surrey, Township of Langley, District of Pitt Meadows and District of Maple Ridge.

The five-party agreement, which took several years to negotiate, details the roles and responsibilities of TransLink and each municipality relative to the design, construction, operation and maintenance of the Golden Ears Bridge.

“This agreement reflects the vision and collaborative spirit of each municipality that stands to benefit from the bridge,” said TransLink Chair Doug McCallum. “It is a true example of local governments working together to improve the entire region.”

TransLink Board authorization represents the final step in the master agreement approval process. Negotiations with all four municipalities were completed in May 2005 and each municipal council has approved the agreement. The mayors of all four municipalities and Chair McCallum will sign the agreement on June 24th.

The agreement defines the scope and standards for the Golden Ears Bridge, provides the mechanism for connecting road network improvements, and establishes the responsibilities and obligations of all parties over the life of the project.

“This is an essential milestone that moves us closer to linking the communities on the north and south side of the Fraser River,” said Golden Ears Bridge Project Director Fred Cummings. It is expected the contract to design, build, finance, operate, maintain and rehabilitate the bridge will be awarded this fall.

Scheduled to open in 2008, the Golden Ears Bridge will provide a six-lane toll bridge across the Fraser River, connecting Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge with Surrey and Langley. The new bridge and associated road network will result in improved north-south access to regional centers and major trade routes such as the Trans Canada Highway. It will benefit the entire region by opening up access to employment, markets, services, facilities and recreational opportunities.

TransLink is the region’s transportation authority, committed to working with communities and all levels of government to build an integrated transportation network that will improve the movement of goods and people through the Greater Vancouver region. TransLink supports the regional growth strategy, air quality objectives and economic development of the Greater Vancouver Regional District.
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Old June 26th, 2005, 08:36 AM   #248
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TransLink hiring new drivers as service expands: Company directors want early delivery on 34 new SkyTrain cars
William Boei
Vancouver Sun
23 June 2005

GREATER VANCOUVER - TransLink and its subsidiaries will be hiring 1,200 employees -- most of them for new jobs -- over the next three years after the transportation authority's board approved a plan Wednesday to expand service hours and accelerate the purchase of new buses.

Planning vice-president Glen Leicester told the TransLink board the new hirings -- mainly drivers and support staff -- will include replacements for retiring employees, but most will be new jobs to help beef up transit service following reports that some bus routes and SkyTrain segments are seriously overcrowded.

TransLink directors also ordered staff to find out whether it is feasible to get early delivery of 34 new SkyTrain cars that are due in 2009. One of the worst congestion points in the transit system is the Main-Street-to-Broadway SkyTrain segment, which is at 99 per cent of capacity during peak periods.

The TransLink subsidiaries that operate transit services will add 83,000 service hours next year, 26,000 more hours in 2007 and another 48,000 hours in 2008.

Fifty new buses due for delivery in 2008 and 2009 will be re-ordered for 2006-07. They are part of a batch of 220 new buses scheduled for delivery over the next four years.

TransLink will also consider keeping its fleet of 17- and 18-year-old diesel buses on the road longer than planned -- perhaps an average of an extra six months per bus -- as it tries to expand service following three years of rapid ridership growth with little or no new capacity.

The plan will cost TransLink more than $50 million, but Leicester told the board it is finally "in a pretty good position to afford it."

TransLink has been strapped for money since its creation in 1999, when the former NDP government reneged on a promise to bring in a new vehicle levy to finance the region's transportation needs.

But things are looking rosier now, with promised revenue from the federal fuel tax a near-certainty, higher ridership boosting fare income, a new tax on parking starting next year and a recent fare increase.

"Because we have those revenue increases, we can now speed up the purchase of our buses and provide better service than our plan calls for," TransLink chair Doug McCallum said after the meeting.

TransLink directors also approved a bylaw that will allow the B.C. Assessment Authority to create a tax roll for the new parking tax.

As well, they authorized the signing of a master agreement with four municipal governments for the new Golden Ears Bridge.

The bridge will connect Surrey and Langley on the south bank of the Fraser River to Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge in the north. The agreement will cover design, construction, operation and maintenance of the bridge; a contract with a builder-operator is expected to be signed in the fall.
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Old June 26th, 2005, 08:37 AM   #249
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Vancouver traffic relief may be on the lines, report says
Canadian Press
24 June 2005

Vancouver -- Greater Vancouver may appear to be losing the battle against traffic congestion and urban sprawl but there is hope the region's two new rapid transit lines will reverse the trend, a report says.

TransLink planning and policy director Clive Rock said the region's afternoon rush hour has expanded to five hours from four.

Mr. Rock's report said 50 per cent of new office jobs are in new office parks scattered on Greater Vancouver's outer edges, where they are difficult to serve by road and impossible by transit.

However, Mr. Rock told TransLink directors on Wednesday that the planned Richmond-Airport-Vancouver rapid transit line and a light-rail extension from the Millennium SkyTrain Line in Burnaby to the designated growth centres could make the difference.
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Old June 27th, 2005, 11:23 PM   #250
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Pedestrians trump the 'green wave'

Ed Drass, with files from James Bow
National Post

Monday, June 27, 2005

In over seven years of writing this column, the most frequent concern I hear from readers is traffic signals. Alan Inglis of Vancouver asks what drivers everywhere want to know: "Can you tell me why timed or phased traffic lights are not used more frequently? In this age of advanced wireless electronics, I think it would be an easy task with many benefits. Vancouver uses this system in a limited manner downtown -- on Georgia, Dunsmuir, Howe and maybe two other streets.

"But why don't we make use of it on all major traffic corridors?

"The system can be used to control speed at the limit. Excess speed is punished by a wait at the next light. I think a greater volume of traffic will flow, and drivers will be more relaxed and mild mannered!"

Getting a string of solid greens may be a technological Holy Grail -- it is so easily stymied by either physics (read traffic congestion) -- or philosophy. Patrick Ryan of the City of Vancouver says signal co-ordination, sometimes called green waves, works better on one-way streets.

When "you get into two-way corridors, it gets a lot more complex," he says. "Trying to co-ordinate the different corridors crossing each other [is] starting to get next to impossible. So, at some stage, you have to pick one corridor."

In many North American cities, one-way streets are found primarily downtown. But rec-ently, Vancouver converted some of its single-direction routes to the old-fashioned style. Like other booming burgs across the country, people are moving back to the city core -- and so are merchants.

Shop owners everywhere want parking available near their stores, as well as good auto access. But what they crave is foot traffic. Says the Vancouver engineer, "Our transportation plan, approved by council, really is a lot more pedestrian focused. Our priority is pedestrians, cyclists, transit, goods movement and the private automobile ... in that order. We do have a different approach. We're not into the higher capacity vehicle flows as much as higher people flow."

One of the city's busiest thoroughfares is Granville Street --where Mr. Ryan says half the people moving along it are riding in transit vehicles. Here, the traffic signal system kicks in to keep service flowing. "Any bus that's running late will get an extended green time, wherever it's possible," he says.

Traffic lights are more and more likely to be timed for those crossing the street. Mr. Ryan says, "Across the board, we've tried to reduce pedestrian wait times as much as possible -- that was a policy decision a while back." How does the central city compare to suburban municipalities? He says, "I think more of the other areas look at more vehicle flow. It's a more traditional approach to transportation engineering."

Before you grumble about pedestrians, keep in mind that the most formidable opponent to green waves is traffic going the other way. The modern intersection is also at fault. Junctions with "fully actuated signals" make it easier to turn left and try to account for volume coming from different directions. Wherever intersection lights are triggered by the presence of traffic, it becomes very difficult to co-ordinate signals along an entire corridor.

Larry McCormick, Edmonton's manager of traffic operations, says that his city does have green waves, especially on routes aimed downtown. Signal timing is tougher in areas of Alberta's capital where traffic does not favour one direction. The priority is balancing delay for all drivers, he says, "so that we don't have these wonderful green waves coming into the city, [leaving] everybody at the side street waiting an outrageous amount of time."

© National Post 2005
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Old June 29th, 2005, 03:08 AM   #251
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http://www.ravprapidtransit.com/en/d...e_feedback.php

Click on Open House Display Boards (link in that webpage) to see station proposals.

I am kind of disappointed with the station proposals, they look "cheap" to me. Only 1 station entrances proposed for the underground stations when they could have multiple entry points connected with underground walkways to make the station more integrated with the neighbourhood.

I was hoping that they would have fare gates, but it seems that they are not going to.
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Old June 29th, 2005, 03:43 AM   #252
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The designs are just base cases - I expect the final designs to be more architecturally interesting - but as for connections, SNC Lavalin has to keep the cost down since they have already bid a price for the project and they have to stay within those constraints - overruns would be at their cost).

I could see additional links being built in the future - like the Royal Centre link to Burrrad Station was built a number of years after the station opened. Ultimately, if a link to Pacific Centre is built - Cadillac Fairview (Pacific Centre's owners) should pay for it since it primarily benefits the mall.

At the info session I attended, a lot of people wanted an internal link to Sinclair Centre for Waterfront - instead of the pavillion in the middle of the street.

As for the double decker stations, the proximity to the surface means that a pedestrian passge cannot be built above the tunnels - so that limits the number of exit passages. Hopefully for Oakridge they'll add another pedestrian passage to the NW corner of the intersection.

I think the single exit model facilitates later installation of fare gates if required - by keeping down the number of them required.
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Old June 30th, 2005, 01:41 AM   #253
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arashi_1987
And for those automated gates...I'd love to see them but Translink is gonna have to do A LOT of changes to their ticket systems...For those who buy tickets it's fine but...what about for the majority of the people [i am assuming] who use monthly passes, U-Pass, and other forms of passes...?? How are they supposed to ge through a automated-machine with those ?? Remember there are no staff at work in most stations to "check" those passes.
It would be nice if they could adopt something like the Octopus Card in Hong Kong.

Quote:
- FARE BOXES on buses are 'retarded'...can put in only 1 coin at a time?? And still they count wront!!! [one time I was on a community bus and put in $1.50 for 1 zone...and the screen reads: $4.10...wow thanks...I wonder where that can take me to] Please, do something about that!!!
*In Japan the Bus fare boxes lets you put all the coins in into a slot and counts the amount you put in (error free) in 1 second.
Those fare boxes are kind of sad. But still better than Toronto's fare box, where I've seen people trick the bus drivers with fake tickets (or tickets split in half), loose change (that's nowhere near the real fare), dimes mistaken for tokens. Sometimes, the drivers just don't seem to care, even though their bread and water relies on it.

The Japanese are always amazing when it comes to techie stuff. Their many innovations deserve applause.
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Old June 30th, 2005, 03:52 AM   #254
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There will always be ways to cheat if you want to, no matter what the case. Build a better rat trap and someone will invent a better rat.
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Old June 30th, 2005, 07:48 AM   #255
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Those arnt the station designs, they are station configurations. I bet may entrances will be inside buildings and will have multiple entrances.
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Old June 30th, 2005, 08:47 AM   #256
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Drilling begins next week to confirm soil conditions for RAV Line project
Vancouver Sun
28 June 2005

VANCOUVER - Drilling begins in False Creek next week to confirm soil conditions along the route of the Richmond-Airport-Vancouver rapid transit line tunnel.

Ravco, the TransLink subsidiary overseeing the RAV Line project, said the drilling will be done by InTransitBC, the name being used to build and operate the line by the consortium that won the bidding, SNC-Lavalin/Serco.

Geotechnical testing will start as early as July 4 and will take place from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Ravco said. Drilling will be done from a barge with navigational lights and markers.

Test holes will be about 15 centimetres in diameter and 30 to 35 metres deep.

The tunnel will be dug by a deep boring machine from about Granville Street and Dunsmuir, under downtown Vancouver and False Creek to Cambie Street at about Second Avenue. From there to 63rd Avenue, "cut and cover" construction will be used; from 63rd Avenue south, the line will run on an elevated guideway similar to SkyTrain.
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Old July 1st, 2005, 06:10 AM   #257
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This thing is going to be unbeleivably disruptive using the cut and cover meathod for the subway parts all for a lousy 70,000/day.
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Old July 1st, 2005, 08:41 AM   #258
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Indeed! And those poor Cambie merchants. If only they knew the truth right from the beginning. They could have killed this project and spared all you Canadian taxpayers the misery. And for what? So little rich kids could joy ride in a near useless subway?
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Old July 1st, 2005, 09:25 AM   #259
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I would think the cut and cover will be done in small sections, so disruptions will minimized. I don't think it's as bad as it sounds. I do feel for the merchants though, and they should be compensated for any loss in business. Give the line a few years and Cambie could become an attractive place to setup shop.
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Old July 1st, 2005, 06:09 PM   #260
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^
Maybe but only after all the current Cambie Street businesses go under.
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