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Old November 21st, 2006, 02:34 AM   #1401
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alesmarv View Post
when are the first articulated trolies finaly coming. Or did they cancel that order?
they will be arriving next year.
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"Preparations for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics are progressing so well, it's boring. We'd like there to be some challenges, so we [the IOC] could shout at them." - IOC (Sept. 2007)


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Old November 21st, 2006, 02:35 AM   #1402
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Credits to Tafryn:



CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS UPDATE AT YVR - NOVEMBER 18, 2006


YVR Station - The YVR station is situated to the south of the International Terminal, and will require the removal of the walkway to the parkade and the elevator/stairwell. Excavation for the station foundation is starting, and a temporary road has been build to divert traffic around the site.

YVR - Sea Island Centre - All of the supports of the guideway have been completed, and the guideway is more than half complete, with all spans of the dual-track section assembled, and two spans of the single-track section assembled.

Sea Island Centre Station - The foundation work for this station is underway, with one of the roads connecting to the north access road closed for the construction.

Sea Island Centre - Templeton - Part of the at-grade section has been poured, with foundation work continuing on other sections. The ramps for the new overpass to allow access to the North Access Road is being prepared.

Templeton Station - The foundation work for this station is underway, and the land to the north is being cleared for future construction of the new parking lots.

Templeton - Bridgeport - Work on the middle-arm bridge continues, with the west section of the span well underway. Work on the middle and east piers continues.


Looking east from the site of the YVR station. A temporary roadway can be seen in the lower right of the picture, which will allow the traffic to bypass the site for the first phase of the station construction.



Looking west towards the airport. The large steel structure in distance, under the crane, is the new Link Building, which will act as the main terminus of the airport branch of the Canada Line.



The erection gantry assembles a single-track segment. It has almost reached the point where the guideway crosses Grant McConachie Way.



Guideway segments hang loose in preparation for tensioning. In the lower left, the point where the guideway transitions from dual-track to single-track can be seen. The future YVR3 station would be just to the west of where the dual-track guideway ends.



The transition section between the elevated section and the at-grade section, between the future YVR3 and the Sea Island Centre station.



Sections of rail for the guideway are unloaded from a truck.



Equipment for surfacing the concrete used for the at-grade sections lies ready for the next pour.



Looking east towards the site of Sea Island Centre station.



Looking west from Sea Island Centre station. The transition from at-grade to elevated guideway can be seen, along with the completed guideway stretching towards the airport terminal buildings.



Piles of pumice used for light-weight fill for embarkments rise front of a completed section of guideway immediately to the west of the site of Templeton Station.


The west-most span of the middle-arm crossing, almost completed across the Arthur Lang bridge.



A guideway segment is used to laterally brace the bridge.



Dynamic bracing keeps the span balanced as segments are added sequentially to each end.



A narrowing gap in the bridge.



A new bridge segment is raised into position to be secured to pier M3.



Pier M4 rises above the water of the Middle Arm of the Fraser River.



The newly secured bridge segment, fully attached to pier M3
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"Preparations for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics are progressing so well, it's boring. We'd like there to be some challenges, so we [the IOC] could shout at them." - IOC (Sept. 2007)


"In medieval Europe if you didn't like somebody's argument and couldn't think of a real response you called them a witch and demanded they be burned at the stake. In the US you call them unpatriotic, and in Canada you call them racist."
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Old November 23rd, 2006, 04:44 AM   #1403
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Apparently there was a crash involving two trucks on the Cokahala(sp?) Highway that were carrying two of the new trolley buses. I didn't get anymore information because I just caught the end of the story on Global.
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Old November 24th, 2006, 10:30 AM   #1404
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Bombardier wins Vancouver SkyTrain contract
To supply rail vehicles for $113 million

Canadian Press

Thursday, November 23, 2006

Bombardier wins $113M contract to supply rail vehicles for Vancouver SkyTrain

MONTREAL -- Bombardier Transportation (TSX:BBD.B) has won a $113-million contract to supply 34 rapid-transit vehicles for Vancouver’s SkyTrain rail transport system.

The deal for advanced ART MKII vehicles includes options for an additional 38 vehicles, which could bring the total value to about $218 million, the Montreal-base company said Thursday.

SkyTrain already operates 60 ART MKII vehicles and 150 ART MKI vehicles.

The Expo Line, the first phase of the SkyTrain rapid transit system, opened in 1986 for the Expo 86 World’s Fair in Vancouver. Construction of the latest phase, the SkyTrain Millennium Line, expanded the system in 2001.

Together, the two lines make up the longest driverless light rapid transit system in the world, covering 49.5 kilometres and 33 stations.

Manufacturing and final assembly of the vehicles will take place at Bombardier Transportation sites in Sahagun, Mexico, and Thunder Bay, Ont. Delivery of the cars is scheduled for the first half of 2009.

The ART MKII cars are also in use on systems at JFK International Airport in New York City and on the Kelana Jaya Line in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. ART MKII cars will also be part of rapid-transit projects under construction in Yongin, South Korea, and Beijing, China.

The Bombardier Transportation Group has its global headquarters in Berlin, with a presence in over 60 countries and an installed base of about 97,000 vehicles worldwide.

Parent firm Bombardier Inc. is a global manufacturer of transportation systems, from regional aircraft and business jets to railway equipment.
© Canadian Press 2006



Meaning 19 of these trains have been ordered:





I don't get why we didn't order some C-vehicles of the same Mark II series, which are $600,000 cheaper than the US$2.91 million A and B "head" vehicles in the pictures shown above.



The C-car for the Mark II are the vehicles in between the two head vehicles, shown below in Kuala Lumpur's ART system, which also uses Mark II vehicles:
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"Preparations for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics are progressing so well, it's boring. We'd like there to be some challenges, so we [the IOC] could shout at them." - IOC (Sept. 2007)


"In medieval Europe if you didn't like somebody's argument and couldn't think of a real response you called them a witch and demanded they be burned at the stake. In the US you call them unpatriotic, and in Canada you call them racist."
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Old November 24th, 2006, 10:39 PM   #1405
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Part of that price difference could also be due to final assembly in Malaysia for the Kuala Lumpur order. KL also had a larger order (88 cars) which probably provided a volume discount.
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Old November 25th, 2006, 09:13 AM   #1406
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The new trains look nice and clean.
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Old December 1st, 2006, 06:54 AM   #1407
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The vehicle for the Canada Line:






RAVCO sure did butcher up the train in their rendering.
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"Preparations for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics are progressing so well, it's boring. We'd like there to be some challenges, so we [the IOC] could shout at them." - IOC (Sept. 2007)


"In medieval Europe if you didn't like somebody's argument and couldn't think of a real response you called them a witch and demanded they be burned at the stake. In the US you call them unpatriotic, and in Canada you call them racist."

Last edited by mr.x; December 1st, 2006 at 07:06 AM.
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Old December 1st, 2006, 09:48 PM   #1408
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i've been pretty impressed by all of the work i've seen in this thread. this may sound like a stupid question but i'm not from the area, so: how does vancouver pay for all these transit improvements (new busses, light rail,etc.)? how is transit in the city run? do all projects have to be approved by voters?
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Old December 2nd, 2006, 12:01 AM   #1409
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The projects are not directly approved by the voters.
Funding comes from a variety of sources.
Historically, the Skytrain capital costs were paid for by the province and operated by the public transit operator (Translink). Translink is a regional government authority with board members appointed from local municipalities' representives on the regional district (i.e county) board and has limited taxing powers.
Buses are funded by Translink (there may also be Canadian federal grants applied)
More recently, the province has backed off paying for all of the capital costs of rapid transit infrastructure projects, so Translink needs to find alternate sources of funding, whether it is the Canadian federal government or local regional taxes imposed by Translink.
For the Canada Line, the province pushed the project as a public-private partnership with funding from the private contractor (InTransitBC, a consortium), the Canadian federal government, the BC provincial government, Translink, the airport authority and minor funding from the cities. It's actually quite unique that all of the funding agencies came together on that project (and there was still a lot of squabbling at the Translink board - the project was voted down twice before being aproved.)
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Old December 3rd, 2006, 10:13 AM   #1410
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Where does the money come from?

First off, it is important to understand that Translink funds, plans, and operates the region's public transit system and also funds, plans, and maintains the regional roads and bridges, those that are not municipally, provincially, or federally owned. The Province owns and funds the maintenance of the intra-provincial routes and highways and the Federal Government owns and funds the maintenance of the one national highway. Municipal governments own and maintain their own roads.

In Canada voters typically do not directly vote to fund infrastructure projects on a regional, provincial, and national scale. In fact I cannot think of a single instance when this has occurred. On a local scale, at least in Vancouver, the city occasionally puts extra-budget projects, or increases in taxation to pay for projects, to citizens at elections. With that said, by and large in Canada the public elects those who will make the decision and we vote `em out quick if they screw up too bad. (Fast Ferries, for the locals reading this)

The following based on Translink's 2005 annual report. http://www.translink.bc.ca/files/pdf...nualReport.pdf

In 2005 Translink had a revenue of approximately $792 million Canadian Dollars and expenses of $572 million (not including major capital projects which appear on a different ledger). Translink funds its shortfalls and major capital projects with bond-issues via the Provincial government's Municipal Finance Authority (S&P AA+Stable/A-1+, Moody's Aaa stable). Translink itself is rated Aa3 Stable by Moody's and AA by the Dominion Bond Rating Service. These bonds are usually snapped up by institutional investors, other levels of government, and are presumably traded on the open capital market.

Translink's revenue, according to Translink's annual report, comes from gas taxes ($255 million, 31%), a property tax and other levies ($216 million, 30%), fares and advertising ($292 million, 36.5%), and fees from its mandatory emissions testing service ($28 million, %3).

Separate from its $572 million in operating expenses, Translink spent an additional $942.7 million on major capital projects. These range from funding several highway widening projects and joint-projects, building and improving overpasses over provincial and national highways, its fifth-share of the cost of the new Canada Line subway, a down payment for the Evergreen Line light-rail project, a total replacement fleet of about 230 electric trolley buses, and a new major highway bridge in conjunction with a private sector partner (P3).

Translink is a bit funny to outsiders, to say the least. It typically pays for an entire project outright, deficit spending if necessary. It then rapidly pays off its debts over several years in budgeted payments as it takes receipt of transfer payments from other levels of government and realizes increased fares from increased public transit readership (20% in three years alone since the second SkyTrain opened and more bus rapid transit capacity was added.

There is currently a governance review of Translink underway by the Provincial government. The reasons for this are cloudy and are probably largely turf-driven, in that a lot of good news is coming out of Translink as it makes substantial progress and the Provincial Government is maybe thinking twice about dumping it off on the region now that it is doing so well. Funny how that has worked out.

I hope this has helped everyone conceptualize Translink a bit better. www.translink.bc.ca for more details, plans, stats, etc.

Detailed ridership histories for public transit in Vancouver can be found at this link on the regional government's website. www.gvrd.bc.ca/growth/keyfacts/transit.htm

Last edited by Vancouverite; December 3rd, 2006 at 10:20 AM. Reason: grammatical error
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Old December 7th, 2006, 01:24 AM   #1411
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From the Vancouver Courier:

'Unfinished' Millennium Line in need of western expansion

By Cheryl Rossi-Staff writer

Vancouver's three TransLink board members want the Millennium Line extended west.

But when the line will be built is unclear.

"A hundred thousand people a day get on and off transit at Broadway and Commercial. We've made a deal with our citizens, which is you get out of your car and we'll provide you with transit_ We're not doing a good enough job right now," said NPA Coun. Suzanne Anton.

The Millennium Line extends from Waterfront Station downtown and follows the Expo Line to Columbia Station in New Westminster. From there, it loops through Burnaby and ends at Vancouver Community College and Clark Drive.

"We regard it as being an unfinished line," said Anton, who noted fellow TransLink board members NPA Coun. Peter Ladner and Mayor Sam Sullivan agree with her position.

The extended line exists only as a concept, but it's expected to go underground at the western end of Great Northern Way, with a station at Main Street and a connection to the Canada Line at Cambie and Broadway. It would likely remain underground until it ends at Granville and Broadway or Arbutus and Broadway.

Work needs to be done to determine what kind of rapid transit would carry riders to UBC, she said, citing a SkyTrain, light rail, streetcar or rapid bus service as possibilities.

"That has been built into TransLink's planning process and it was supposed to be done in '06," she said. "That didn't happen in '06 so it is now planned-at our insistence, I might add-for '07 so we need to do that piece of planning work."

TransLink will work on its new three-year plan in 2007, with the plan to begin in 2008.

Anton expects planning for the Broadway corridor to take two years. Money would come from TransLink and the provincial and federal governments, so she did not want to guess when residents can expect faster transit across the city.

But before TransLink can focus on the Broadway corridor, it wants to build the Evergreen Line linking Port Moody and Coquitlam to Burnaby's Lougheed Station. The $970 million project is $400 million short and TransLink is seeking more money from the provincial and federal governments and other sources. Despite the significant shortfall, work is slated to commence on the 11-kilometre line in September 2007. The line is expected to be in service by September 2011.

Anton said transportation along the Broadway corridor has been on the city's agenda for six years and sits at the top of its priority list with the downtown streetcar plan.

Anton wants a streetcar running along 41st Avenue included in planning for transit to UBC to improve east-west connections as part of a streetcar grid developed for the city.

TransLink hasn't made any commitments to the proposed plan that could see a $60 million streetcar line connecting Granville Island to Science World.

In October, city council committed up to $300,000 to complete a more detailed design of the streetcar line to Science World.

published on 12/06/2006
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Old December 9th, 2006, 11:57 PM   #1412
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SkyTrain threatened by strike action as early as next week
TRANSPORT I Employees' union says its members have voted 90 per cent in favour of a walkout

GREATER VANCOUVER I SkyTrain could be hit by a strike as early as the end of next week, the Canadian Union of Public Employees said Friday.

CUPE Local 7000, which represents 516 SkyTrain attendants, control operators, skilled trades, maintenance and clerical staff, said its members voted 90 per cent in favour of strike action.

The primary issues are wages and benefits.

It would be only the second strike in SkyTrain history. The first one, in 1999, lasted just one day -- a Sunday.

SkyTrain service has also been stopped several times when other unions picketed SkyTrain facilities and CUPE members did not cross their lines.

A SkyTrain strike likely would put even more pressure on TransLink's overcrowded major bus routes and seriously snarl traffic as tens of thousands of commuters who normally ride SkyTrain try to find other ways to get to work.

Local 7000 president Gerry Cunningham said there is a chance to avert a strike next Wednesday when negotiators for the union and for B.C. Rapid Transit Co., a TransLink operating company, take part in a mediation session. Union officials will decide after that session whether a strike is warranted.

The union wants wage, shift premium and benefit parity with other TransLink workers, such as the bus drivers employed by Coast Mountain Bus Co., and a guarantee they won't fall behind as other unions negotiate new contracts.

Before 1999, when regional transit was provided by BC Transit, Local 7000 wage rates were tied to those of other Greater Vancouver transit operations. Under a "comparator wage rate" established by mediator Vince Ready, they made 10 to 12 cents an hour more than other transit workers.

But under TransLink, which was established in 1999, "we have fallen behind," Cunningham said, "and our intention this time around is to catch up and ensure that when we do catch up, that we don't fall behind again."

In a news release, Local 7000 said the union wants "guarantees that anything gained in future TransLink subsidiary bargaining rounds are also applied to SkyTrain employees." About 4,000 TransLink subsidiary employees have yet to start bargaining for new contracts.

Local 7000 said the company's most recent offer was rejected by about two thirds of the local's members.

Negotiators have been discussing a four-year contract that would run until fall 2010. But Cunningham said the company "wants to get over the hump of the Olympics" without committing itself to possible wage escalation in the meantime.

Cunningham would not provide details of the two sides' positions, saying, "I'm trying to give the company as much of an opportunity as possible to address our concerns at bargaining."

TransLink referred questions to BC Rapid Transit, whose officials could not be reached Friday.

http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/n...8-e10fe25d750a
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Old December 14th, 2006, 04:52 AM   #1413
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Robots don't go on strike

The SkyTrain is automated and from what I have read it has only been out of service for one day in its service life for non-mechanical reasons. It ran throughout the infamous transit strike of 2001 while the rest of the system was out of action. I have to say that the SkyTrain staff, who do so little anyway, can go ahead and strike for all I care. The trains are run by computers, Transit Police do all the heavy lifting for security now, and there are more than enough managers to run SkyTrain control and respond to emergencies. The unionized staff of Translink are sorely mistaken if they think the genreal public is on their side and they have not been forgiven for causing a four month transit strike five years ago.
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Old December 14th, 2006, 08:19 AM   #1414
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the busses are a different company to the skytrain

the only thing that would affect both is if the bus union or the skytrain respected the other unions picket lines

latest news on the radio this evening says vancouver should expect some disruption this weekend due to job action

the 4 month strike a few years ago was the bus union - nothing to do with skytrain - hence why skytrain continued running
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Old December 15th, 2006, 12:47 AM   #1415
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yeah, different unions. If Skytrain had "drivers" rather than "computer operators" (or whatever their title is) then they may be in the same union.....
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Old December 18th, 2006, 12:53 AM   #1416
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Rail revival dream won’t die

By Jeff Nagel
Black Press
Dec 17 2006

It appears technically possible to run a rapid transit rail service from Surrey’s Scott Road SkyTrain Station all the way to downtown Langley.

But it would be tricky and expensive.

Those are the key findings of consultants hired by TransLink to take a first look at the feasibility of reopening passenger rail service on the old electric interurban rail route, which linked Vancouver to Chilliwack until it was shut down in the 1950s.

Rough cost estimates range from $350 million for a diesel-powered heavy rail system with nine stations to $700 million for an electric light rail system that would be more frequent and allow 16 stations along the 27-kilometre route.

The study by DRL Solutions Inc. shows possible station locations and assumed frequent service – not the peak-only service offered by the West Coast Express from Vancouver to Mission.

The concept so far hasn’t been at the top of TransLink’s vision to serve projected growth in Surrey and Langley.

“It wouldn’t stand out as our first choice,” said Graeme Masterton, TransLink’s program manager of transit planning.

Instead, bus rapid transit, eventually replaced by light rail lines, are eyed for King George Highway and 104 Avenue, and potentially the Fraser Highway and Highway 1.

But reviving the historic interurban route has captivated rail fans and gained momentum.

Surrey city council voted this fall to hire its own project manager to explore a community rail option on the route. A volunteer group is restoring old interurban cars in hopes of launching a heritage run for tourists.

And even TransLink has said all ideas are on the table as it works with locals to draw up a new South of Fraser area plan to chart the future of transit as the sub-region grows from 600,000 now to one million by 2031.

“We said, ‘Okay, let’s have a look’,” said TransLink spokesman Ken Hardie. “What would it take to make it happen?”

A lot, it turns out.

The consultants tabled a long list of challenges:

- Railway operators may oppose the passenger rail idea, fearing it will hinder freight runs. The study assumes local Surrey freight trains would run at night only and trains that don’t stop locally will be rerouted via another line.

- The route through Surrey is flanked by two lines of B.C. Hydro transmission poles, which would be costly and complex to move if the line must be double-tracked.

- Heavy and growing congestion on the segment of the CPR line that would be used from Cloverdale to Langley.

- Tightened regulations are expected to run passenger service on a route shared with freight trains.

Advocates of the interurban route are undeterred.

“We did not see anything that was a show stopper,” said former Surrey and Langley Township planner Terry Lyster, who is a member of VALTAC (Valley Transportation Advisory Committee).

“Those are large numbers,” he said of the cost estimates. “But the numbers to build new crossings of the Fraser River are much larger.”

He noted the per kilometre costs are less than a quarter of construction costs for TransLink’s new $1.9-billion Canada Line or $1-billion proposed Evergreen Line.

Getting a fair shake in transit spending is one of the motives at play – some see TransLink sucking plenty of money out of Surrey and Langley residents and investing most of it in deluxe transit systems north of the river.

“They’ve run out of money and they’ve done nothing for the South of the Fraser area,” charged Peter Holt, executive director of the Surrey Board of Trade.

He and others suspect the transportation authority has engineered the study to inflate the costs and squash the interurban rail route aspirations.

Lyster also believes a community passenger rail service along the line can be started at less cost than projected.

They argue double tracking the existing Southern Railway of B.C. line through Surrey isn’t necessary as long as there are lots of stations with sidings where passenger trains would allow freight trains to pass.

And some say it could be done even more cheaply just as far as Cloverdale, truncating the more complex leg to Langley.

“It can technically be done,” said Allen Aubert, one of Surrey’s two representatives on TransLink’s South of Fraser planning committee. “I think it’s fairly positive.”

He sees a community railway powered by hydrogen fuel cells that could be a demonstration project in time for the 2010 Olympics, drawing support from the government’s Hydrogen Highway initiative.


“It could be quite unique and completely pollution free,” said Aubert.

One hydrogen fuel station already exists. It’s run by B.C. Hydro’s Powertech Labs in Surrey and is located on 88 Avenue, precisely where that road intersects the old interurban line.

TransLink and local rail advocates agree on at least one thing: people mainly need to move between neighbourhoods in Surrey and Langley, not commute to downtown Vancouver.

That’s backed up by TransLink research that shows more than 85 per cent of trips by residents south of the Fraser stay within the region.

Twice as many people commute from Surrey to Langley or vice-versa than go to downtown Vancouver.


Those stats persuaded TransLink that what’s needed isn’t a peak-hours only commuter service geared solely to get Surrey and Langley residents to the SkyTrain and on to Vancouver.

TransLink officials promise more work to explore the potential of the interurban route. The next step, to happen by the end of 2007, is to estimate potential ridership and revenue – key elements for determining the viability of a service.

Because higher density development would surely follow a light rail line, TransLink will also be looking to Surrey council for guidance.

Opposition from city hall would likely sink the route, officials hint, while strong support could catapult it into serious contention.


THE FOUR OPTIONS:

Heavy Rail – Diesel

Push-Pull

- $363 million.

- Same as West Coast Express, with engines at each end of the train.

- 30-minute peak service. Hourly service off-peak.

- 40-minute run time, including stops.

- Nine stations.

- Peak hourly passenger capacity: 1,608.


Heavy Rail – Diesel Multiple Units:

- $356 million.

- ‘Budd’ cars, each self-propelled by diesel.

- 30-minute peak service. Hourly service off-peak.

- 40-minute run time, including stops.

- Nine stations.

- Peak hourly passenger capacity: 1,504.

- Project may be reliant on only a single supplier of cars.


Light Rail – Diesel Multiple Units:

- $592 million.

- Each articulated car self-propelled by diesel. Similar to Ottawa’s O-Train.

- 15-minute service.

- 42-minute run time, including stops.

- 16 stations.

- Peak hourly passenger capacity: 3,240.

- Top speed isn’t as fast as heavy rail, but light rail cars accelerate and brake much faster, cutting travel time and allowing more station stops.


Light Rail – Electric Multiple Units:

- $697 million.

- Each car with own electric power. Similar to light rail lines in Calgary, Portland.

- 15-minute service at all times.

- 42-minute run time, including stops.

- Nine stations.

- Peak hourly passenger capacity: 2,048.

- Electric option would be greenest solution.

Some costs like acquiring property, engineering and environmental studies aren’t included. But there is an extra 30 per cent for contingency.


Stations

The route runs initially southwest from the Scott Road SkyTrain station to the Scott Road corridor, then angles southeast to Cloverdale and east to Langley.

The following station sites were tentatively identified:

- Terminus at Scott Road SkyTrain station. Passenger rail trains to arrive at same level as SkyTrain.

- Three stations (only one if heavy rail is chosen) near 120 Street between 100 Avenue and 88 Avenue.

- Stations at 128 Street and 84 Avenue, 132 Street near 79th (light rail only), King George Highway and 72 Avenue, 144 Street at 68 Avenue (light rail only) and 152 Street at 65 Avenue.

- Two stations in Cloverdale near Highway 10, at 168 Street and 176 Street.

-In Langley, two to five stations on two different possible routes, depending if heavy or light rail is chosen. The light rail option shows five stations through the downtown core, ending at Kwantlen University College. The heavy rail route runs further north, closer to Langley Bypass and the Willowbrook Mall.
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Old December 18th, 2006, 09:12 AM   #1417
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Bus to SkyTrain starts Monday

The long-awaited bus line to SkyTrain starts next Monday morning at rush hour.

That's when the new No. 791 takes off from Haney Place Mall and goes west to Braid SkyTrain station in New Westminster.

For commuters, it will save changing buses at Coquitlam Centre and mean only one bus to worry about. But they won't break any speed records getting there. Travel time for the rush-hour only service is estimated to take almost an hour. That's partly because the bus will make 16 stops in Maple Ridge, 12 in Pitt Meadows and another five west of the Pitt River Bridge as it travels along Lougheed Highway via the Mary Hill bypass.

Initially, the bus will run just during rush hours, every 30 minutes. The first bus out of Haney Place Mall will be at 4:35 a.m. and the last bus to leave Braid SkyTrain station is 7:20 p.m. The route out of Maple Ridge will follow Dewdney Trunk Road west to Maple Meadows Way, turn south, then go west on Hammond Road to Harris Road and back on to Lougheed Highway.

Maple Ridge Mayor Gordy Robson has criticized the route, saying it should be an express service straight along the highway with limited stops.

http://www.mapleridgenews.com/portal...d=791840&more=
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Old December 19th, 2006, 08:05 AM   #1418
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Thanks!

That double decker excavation will be deep!

*********

From the Richmond News:

Quake won't topple Canada Line

By Nelson Bennett

Imagine you are riding the Canada Line rapid transit system when the earthquake hits.

It's a bad one - the same magnitude as the one that collapsed causeways and toppled buildings in Kobe, Japan in 1995.

You are on the Richmond segment, which is elevated five metres off the ground - ground that is prone to liquefaction during earthquakes.

You feel the train shake and sway, and you wonder if it will come off the tracks and plunge onto the cars below you on No. 3 Road.

The drivers of the cars below you wonder the same thing.

Roger Woodhead, engineer in charge of ensuring the Canada Line's design, says the swaying back and forth should be the worst thing that would happen during an earthquake.

"If a car did derail, it wouldn't go very far," said Woodhead.

The rail system is designed with concrete curbs to prevent cars from bouncing off the track, in the event they derail.

That's just one of the engineering methods used to mitigate the impact of a major tumbler, like the Kobe quake, which killed more than 5,000 people.

The earthquake damaged more than half of the city's bridges, collapsed elevated tracks for the famed Shinkansen fast train, and knocked over a huge span of the Hanshin Expressway - an elevated causeway built on concrete columns.

"I think the Kobe earthquake was a wakeup call," Woodhead said.

When they were given the task of designing the Canada Line, mitigating earthquake damage on the Richmond portion was one of the top things on the minds of engineers.

"It was one of the first things we looked at - what are we going to do as far as pilings in Richmond," Woodhead said. "There were 10 or 12 technical issues we had to deal with, and that was one of them."

Another challenge is boring a two-kilometre long tunnel underneath False Creek.

Richmond is an island built up over the millennia by silt deposited by the Fraser River. It has a subsurface three to 10 metres thick made up of water-saturated granular soils, says John Claque, a geologist with the Department of Earth Science at Simon Fraser University. On top of that is a layer of clay-like soil.

It's the subsurface of granular soil that liquefies during an earthquake.

"It's not like everything is going to slump into the sea," Claque said. "Not everything beneath Richmond is going to liquefy."

Liquefaction happens rapidly, but stops as soon as the ground stops shaking.

"It doesn't take very long - a minute or so," Claque said.

During liquefaction, the subsurface soils begin to flow, which can cause structural damage.

Much of the damage caused in Kobe was due to liquefaction.

Fortunately, the Kobe quake taught engineers some valuable lessons on mitigating the impact of earthquakes.

Roughly half of the Canada Line's 19 kilometres of track will be below ground, including a two-kilometre stretch running 35 metres deep beneath False Creek.

While the prospect of being trapped 35 metres down in a train during an earthquake might make the bravest person claustrophobic, it is probably one of the safer places to be, Canada Line officials say.

"Tunnels are very stable in an earthquake," Woodhead said. "You tend not to get very high forces underground."

Then again, the architects of the Shinkansen train in Japan were shocked to find parts of the train's tunnel collapsed.

One of the biggest challenges for Canada Line engineers was designing the North Arm bridge that will bring trains across the Fraser River from Vancouver to Richmond. The Middle Arm is a shorter span, so designing the bridge taking trains to the airport was not as challenging.

Below the silty soil that makes up Richmond is a sloping mountain of glacial till, which is relatively solid - solid enough to anchor the bridge with steel and concrete pilings.

On the Richmond side, engineers must go 45 metres down to anchor the pilings in till.

Building a bridge in sandy soil wasn't the only challenge. Because ships use the North Arm, engineers had to design the North Arm Bridge with only two piers, set 180 metres apart. Typically, they would have used more piers set closer together to give the bridge added strength.

"The challenge is to be able to build a bridge there and not interfere with the shipping channel," said InTransit public affairs vice-president Steve Crombie.

Having only two piers means they each must bear a heavier load. Moreover, because of the bridge's proximity to the airport, engineers were restricted in how high they could go with cable stay towers. These towers, like the ones on the Alex Fraser bridge, rise high above the bridge and strengthen it by applying upward pressure with steel cables.

They added strength to the bridge by running braided steel cables along its length.

"It holds it tight, basically, and takes the load," Woodhead said.

Half of the Canada Line will be elevated, coming out of the ground around 64th Avenue in Vancouver, and continuing above-ground for the entire Richmond segment, and for a portion of the airport segment.

There will be 250 concrete guideway columns, each one of which will have four to eight concrete and steel pilings. The pilings will be driven 12 metres down into what Woodhead describes as "fairly compact sand."

The tendency during an earthquake would be for the elevated causeway to bend in one direction, as the ground slips underneath. That slipping would pull pilings on one side upwards, and push the ones on the other side deeper into the ground.

To prevent that, Canada Line engineers came up with pilings that essentially have roots, like a tree. These "expanded base pilings" have a concrete bulb at the end.

This bulb - acting like a deeply buried root - would prevent the pilings on one side from being pulled up, and the ones on the other side from being pushed deeper.

The worst thing that could happen is that one of the concrete guideways could actually snap.

"I guess the column could break," Woodhead said, "but they're very heavily reinforced (with steel)."

As for the pilings themselves, there are doubly reinforced steel casings inside. They are also narrower than usual. Smaller diameters make it easier for liquefying soil to flow around the pilings, which decreases pressure on them.

This was discovered when computer modeling was done to test the design.

"Instead of this material pushing the piles over, it flows around them," Woodhead said.

Asked what the chances are that a train will be knocked off the elevated guideway during an earthquake, Woodhead said: "zero."

published on 12/15/2006




Great Canadian Gaming Corporation, TransLink, Canada
Line announce Bridgeport Station Parkade Agreement

Great Canadian Gaming Corporation (GCGC), the Greater Vancouver
Transportation Authority (TransLink) and Canada Line Rapid Transit Inc. (CLCO) are
pleased to announce an agreement for the building and operating of a vehicle
parking facility adjacent to the future Canada Line Bridgeport Station and
immediately across River Road from the River Rock Casino Resort.
The agreement guarantees 1,200 spaces for transit users between 5:30 am and
7:00 pm on business days and available parking for Canada Line passengers during
transit’s off-peak hours. TransLink will set the parking rate during peak transit hours,
proposed to be $2 per day in 2009.
Originally, the parkade was to have been built by InTransitBC, the consortium
constructing the Canada Line, as part of the project. Under the agreement, GCGC
will build the facility. The new agreement will result in a better parking facility for
transit customers at the Canada Line’s Bridgeport Station as well as guests of River
Rock Casino Resort. The agreement will also reduce costs by $8 million.
“This new approach is very good for all concerned” said TransLink Chair Malcolm
Brodie. “Given that River Rock’s peak hours, evenings and weekends, are effectively
transit’s non-peak hours, we feel that this partnership with Great Canadian works
very well for everyone. Our customers - Lower Mainland transit users - will be getting
a larger, top notch facility with improved surveillance, lighting and retail amenities at
a low daily charge that will encourage transit use.”
The agreement calls for the transfer of 5 parcels of land residual to the needs of the
Project and $4.5 million to GCGC in return for which GCGC will build and operate
the parkade. “Some of the land included in the transaction is currently required for
the construction of the Canada Line but once the Line is built the property will no
longer be needed,” said CLCO Chief Executive Officer, Jane Bird. “Transferring the
land now to achieve a high quality parkade for transit users makes a lot of sense.”
“This agreement benefits both transit users and our guests so we’re very pleased,”
said Ross J. McLeod, Chief Executive Officer of Great Canadian Gaming
Corporation. “Our guests will have access to additional parking on the weekends
and in transit’s off-peak hours thus ensuring full use of the facility.”
About the Canada Line
The Canada Line rapid transit system will run fully separated from traffic between the
transportation hub at Waterfront Centre in Vancouver, the heart of Richmond’s civic precinct,
and Vancouver International Airport. With 16 stations, two bridges, over 9 km of tunnel,
parking and bus facilities, and transit capacity equivalent to 10 road lanes, the Canada Line
will be an important new link in the regional transportation network.
The Government of Canada and the Government of British Columbia, the Greater
Vancouver Transportation Authority (TransLink), and Vancouver International Airport
Authority are funding the Canada Line, which is also supported by the Cities of Vancouver
and Richmond. The project is overseen by Canada Line Rapid Transit Inc. (CLCO), a
subsidiary of TransLink. The Line is being designed, built, operated, maintained and partially
financed by InTransitBC.
__________________
"My Homer is not a communist. He may be a liar, a pig, an idiot, a communist, but he is NOT a porn star." - Abe Simpson

"Preparations for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics are progressing so well, it's boring. We'd like there to be some challenges, so we [the IOC] could shout at them." - IOC (Sept. 2007)


"In medieval Europe if you didn't like somebody's argument and couldn't think of a real response you called them a witch and demanded they be burned at the stake. In the US you call them unpatriotic, and in Canada you call them racist."
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Old December 21st, 2006, 01:56 AM   #1419
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Pics of Skytrain in the snow from Flickr:

Up the King George Hwy hill posted by .rW dated Dec 8, 2006:
image hosted on flickr


King George Station posted by .rW dated Dec 3, 2006:
image hosted on flickr
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Last edited by officedweller; December 21st, 2006 at 02:03 AM.
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Old December 21st, 2006, 02:20 AM   #1420
alta-bc
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Regarding the earthquake article, I wonder how earthquake resistant the initial Expo line is in comparison to the Millenium Line and Canada Line. The Millenium Line is much more "beefier" looking as far as columns and guideways is concerned (compared to Expo line), yet both lines carry the same stress loads. Technically, the Expo line is more stressed because of the combined frequency of the Expo and Millenium Lines.

Great pictures btw!
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