daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > Philippine Forums > Around the Philippines > Photography, Heritage and Architecture

Photography, Heritage and Architecture Participate in the FPC, the weekly Filipino Photo Contest



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 28th, 2005, 12:49 PM   #3561
Lili
The Original is The Best
 
Lili's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 6,090
Likes (Received): 8

Thanks Lloyd. Ijust listened to the Paul Anka song. How apt to wake up Monday workday morning reading that site. I especially liked the Slow Down therapy.
Lili no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old November 28th, 2005, 12:49 PM   #3562
Lili
The Original is The Best
 
Lili's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 6,090
Likes (Received): 8

Thanks Lloyd. Ijust listened to the Paul Anka song. How apt to wake up Monday workday morning reading that site. I especially liked the Slow Down therapy.
Lili no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 01:52 PM   #3563
Wonderboy
a.k.a Escolta Kid
 
Wonderboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Manila
Posts: 2,260
Likes (Received): 2


Last edited by Wonderboy; November 28th, 2005 at 01:59 PM.
Wonderboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 01:52 PM   #3564
Wonderboy
a.k.a Escolta Kid
 
Wonderboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Manila
Posts: 2,260
Likes (Received): 2

Wonderboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 01:55 PM   #3565
Wonderboy
a.k.a Escolta Kid
 
Wonderboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Manila
Posts: 2,260
Likes (Received): 2



Grand Dame ready for another facelift
First posted 04:06am (Mla time) Nov 22, 2005
By Jerome Aning
Inquirer News Service

Editor's Note: Published on page A1 of the Nov. 22, 2005 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

(First of two parts)

AFTER almost a decade of neglect and disuse, the Metropolitan Theater -- fondly called the Met -- will be restored to its former glory.

Three government agencies finally got their act together and will be working to restore the “grand dame” of Manila’s theaters, which is located at the Liwasang Bonifacio in Manila.

The National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA), the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS) and the City of Manila had set aside their differences and signed a work and action plan last June.

In response, President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo ordered the release of P50 million to partially fund the restoration of the Met.

A private consultancy firm was commissioned to conduct a detailed engineering study (DES) of the theater, which began last week. In five months, the firm will submit its report detailing the condition of the Met’s structure and how it could be restored.

It took no less than Ms Arroyo herself to end the feud among the NCCA, GSIS and City Hall. On Jan. 7, 2004, she witnessed the signing of a tripartite agreement among Manila Mayor Lito Atienza, GSIS president Winston Garcia and Tourism Undersecretary Evelyn Pantig, NCCA chair.

The agreement was an offshoot of the President’s speech at the 2002 Cultural and Arts Conference, where she spoke of the need to make culture “folksy,” stressing that one of her administration’s priorities was to provide an accessible culture and arts venue for the masses.

“We must make culture available … [and] attractive to the masses,” Ms Arroyo said.

“I don’t think the Cultural Center of the Philippines will serve this purpose because it is imposing, unapproachable and elitist," she said. "The one that the poor will find approachable physically and psychologically is the Met and I feel we should revive it.”

Curiously, the Arroyo administration’s goal of pro-poor and people-oriented programs for the soon-to-be restored Met were the same as former first lady and Metro Manila governor Imelda Marcos’ when she pushed for the Met’s 1978 renovation.

“This theater is dedicated to a singular goal: To surface the true, the good and the beautiful in the Filipino in Metropolitan Manila,” Marcos said in her message for the 1978 reopening.

NCCA supervision

Under the 2004 tripartite agreement, the NCCA, GSIS and City Hall would put together their resources to spearhead the restoration of the Met to its former grandeur befitting the country’s center of the arts and culture for the masses.

The GSIS, as owner of the 7.6-hectare lot where the Met stands, turned over to City Hall the property, except for the commercial spaces. Under the agreement, the GSIS recognized the fact that as a social security institution, it could not operate, maintain and preserve the Met.

For its part, the City Hall of Manila committed to spearhead the enhancement and improvement not only of the Met’s physical structure, but also its cultural and historical significance. It would also construct or improve the Met’s music halls, actor’s studio, conference and lecture rooms, library, museum, multipurpose hall or ballroom, toilets rooms and parking areas.

However, City Hall was tasked to conduct the restoration of the Met in accordance with the internationally accepted standards of conservation that the NCCA shall provide.

Restoring the theater

How the Met’s restoration should proceed and how long it would take depends on the cooperation of the three agencies.

Rose Beatrix Angeles, NCCA commissioner in charge of national heritage sites, said the commission’s plan was to restore the Met as much a possible to the 1978 version. The lead architect then was Otillo Arellano, nephew of the building’s original architect in 1931, Juan Arellano.

But before the restoration work could begin, the three agencies needed to agree on the work and action plan, or WAP. This was when the delays started.

Angeles said some people in City Hall thought that the NCCA would simply turn over the P50 million to the city government, leaving the bidding and the construction work to City Hall.

The commissioner stressed that the agreement stated that the rehabilitation was to be a collaborative work of the three agencies.

She added that the NCCA had a mandate to make sure that its funds were used properly in the restoration, which should be done in accordance with the internationally accepted standards set by the International Council for Monuments and Sites (Icomos).

The Paris-based Icomos is one of Unesco’s two world heritage-monitoring arms.

Objections and revisions

The Met Conservation Committee, which is chaired by Manila Mayor Atienza, is composed of another representative from the city, two from the GSIS and two from the NCCA.

After the 2004 elections, the NCCA conducted a feasibility study, which included the inspection of the property and the preparation of pertinent documents.

In September the same year, the NCCA came up with the WAP. Angeles said that while the GSIS agreed with the WAP the following month, the City of Manila kept returning the draft to the NCCA with various objections and asking for revisions.

It was only in April 2005, “after much persuasion” that the NCCA was able to get City Hall to agree to the WAP, Angeles said.

Personally, however, the commissioner said she thought the contracts with City Hall were “strange” because by law, it’s the NCCA -- or more particularly, one of its member agencies, the National Historical Institute (NHI) -- that should conduct the restoration of landmarks.

Atienza’s track record

“The restoration is being turned over to a non-expert … so we have to ensure that City Hall complies with the highest standards of conservation,” she said, recalling that the Manila city government “does not exactly rank high” among conservationists and heritage-savers.

Angeles was referring to Atienza’s disagreements with the NCCA, the NHI, the National Museum and other government agencies and private groups on the preservation of “culturally significant” sites, such as the Jai-Alai Building, Mehan Garden, Arroceros Forest Park, the Paco and Tutuban train stations, and the San Lazaro racetrack.

The commissioner also said that people should not be suspicious or impatient if they don’t see any actual construction work at the Met just yet.

“Everything has to be in order … we want to be as close to the original as possible. We’ll make sure that much of the original remains there for the next generations to appreciate,” Angeles said.

Research work

The commissioner recounted that in the ongoing restoration work for the Montpelier estate of US President James Madison in Orange, Virginia, the research alone took two years, during which the building was not touched. The estate, which changed hands twice, would be restored to its 1820s version.

The seven-year restoration employed not just researchers but also assorted craftsmen, architects and even archaeologists.

“We do move slowly, yes, but the rewards will last longer. We want to restore the Met and make it usable. We want to make it sturdy so it will remain a symbol for a long, long time,” Angeles explained.

She said the P50 million that would be given to City Hall was also subject to government regulations on spending and auditing. The amount was not nearly enough for the Met’s complete restoration, which was estimated to be P200 million.

The NCCA released an initial P15 million, of which P1 million was earmarked for the full documentation of the Met.

Another P4 million was set for the detailed engineering study (DES), the contract for which was awarded to Schema Konsult Inc., a Pasig City-based engineering, planning and project management consultancy firm.

Old meets new

The remaining P10 million would be released to City Hall for the restoration of the theater roof, which is a primary concern. Also in the priority list are: raising the floor from floodwaters and checking the electrical system.

Angeles said the NCCA also wanted to conduct “a deeper investigation of the structure, to find out exactly what changes were made between the 1930s and the 1978 structure.”

“If you go in without a plan, you could lose architectural details and designs, and technological innovations that we might not have seen,” she explained.

Architecture scholar Edson Cabalfin said the culture expressed in the architectural style of a building constructed in a particular era is often the product of “intermingling and hybridization of cultures.”

Nationalists may point out that the Art Deco style of the Met was something foreign and forced upon by American colonizers. Not so, according to Cabalfin, author of a critical historiography of the Philippine Art Deco from 1927 to 1941.

He said the Met and the other Art Deco buildings served as expressions of the Filipino struggle for identity -- one that would blend Filipino, Asian, Spanish and American influences.

Met as symbol

“[A]s much as Art Deco is seen as the seeming ‘infiltration’ of a foreign agent in another culture, the style can also be read as the means an ‘infiltrated’ culture adapts and responds to an outside power,” Cabalfin explained.

Philippine Art Deco then, he added, can be understood as “the dynamics of the imposition of power by the colonizer and the demonstration of resistance and empowerment of the colonized.”

Angeles said the NCCA realized that its reputation was at stake with the Met restoration project.

“The Met is more than a theater. It is a symbol. If we screw up this one, we’ll never live it down. We’ll become known as the agency that ruined the Met. The people may forget the City of Manila or GSIS, but they will not forget the NCCA because this [restoration] is our mandate,” she said.
Wonderboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 01:55 PM   #3566
Wonderboy
a.k.a Escolta Kid
 
Wonderboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Manila
Posts: 2,260
Likes (Received): 2



Grand Dame ready for another facelift
First posted 04:06am (Mla time) Nov 22, 2005
By Jerome Aning
Inquirer News Service

Editor's Note: Published on page A1 of the Nov. 22, 2005 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

(First of two parts)

AFTER almost a decade of neglect and disuse, the Metropolitan Theater -- fondly called the Met -- will be restored to its former glory.

Three government agencies finally got their act together and will be working to restore the “grand dame” of Manila’s theaters, which is located at the Liwasang Bonifacio in Manila.

The National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA), the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS) and the City of Manila had set aside their differences and signed a work and action plan last June.

In response, President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo ordered the release of P50 million to partially fund the restoration of the Met.

A private consultancy firm was commissioned to conduct a detailed engineering study (DES) of the theater, which began last week. In five months, the firm will submit its report detailing the condition of the Met’s structure and how it could be restored.

It took no less than Ms Arroyo herself to end the feud among the NCCA, GSIS and City Hall. On Jan. 7, 2004, she witnessed the signing of a tripartite agreement among Manila Mayor Lito Atienza, GSIS president Winston Garcia and Tourism Undersecretary Evelyn Pantig, NCCA chair.

The agreement was an offshoot of the President’s speech at the 2002 Cultural and Arts Conference, where she spoke of the need to make culture “folksy,” stressing that one of her administration’s priorities was to provide an accessible culture and arts venue for the masses.

“We must make culture available … [and] attractive to the masses,” Ms Arroyo said.

“I don’t think the Cultural Center of the Philippines will serve this purpose because it is imposing, unapproachable and elitist," she said. "The one that the poor will find approachable physically and psychologically is the Met and I feel we should revive it.”

Curiously, the Arroyo administration’s goal of pro-poor and people-oriented programs for the soon-to-be restored Met were the same as former first lady and Metro Manila governor Imelda Marcos’ when she pushed for the Met’s 1978 renovation.

“This theater is dedicated to a singular goal: To surface the true, the good and the beautiful in the Filipino in Metropolitan Manila,” Marcos said in her message for the 1978 reopening.

NCCA supervision

Under the 2004 tripartite agreement, the NCCA, GSIS and City Hall would put together their resources to spearhead the restoration of the Met to its former grandeur befitting the country’s center of the arts and culture for the masses.

The GSIS, as owner of the 7.6-hectare lot where the Met stands, turned over to City Hall the property, except for the commercial spaces. Under the agreement, the GSIS recognized the fact that as a social security institution, it could not operate, maintain and preserve the Met.

For its part, the City Hall of Manila committed to spearhead the enhancement and improvement not only of the Met’s physical structure, but also its cultural and historical significance. It would also construct or improve the Met’s music halls, actor’s studio, conference and lecture rooms, library, museum, multipurpose hall or ballroom, toilets rooms and parking areas.

However, City Hall was tasked to conduct the restoration of the Met in accordance with the internationally accepted standards of conservation that the NCCA shall provide.

Restoring the theater

How the Met’s restoration should proceed and how long it would take depends on the cooperation of the three agencies.

Rose Beatrix Angeles, NCCA commissioner in charge of national heritage sites, said the commission’s plan was to restore the Met as much a possible to the 1978 version. The lead architect then was Otillo Arellano, nephew of the building’s original architect in 1931, Juan Arellano.

But before the restoration work could begin, the three agencies needed to agree on the work and action plan, or WAP. This was when the delays started.

Angeles said some people in City Hall thought that the NCCA would simply turn over the P50 million to the city government, leaving the bidding and the construction work to City Hall.

The commissioner stressed that the agreement stated that the rehabilitation was to be a collaborative work of the three agencies.

She added that the NCCA had a mandate to make sure that its funds were used properly in the restoration, which should be done in accordance with the internationally accepted standards set by the International Council for Monuments and Sites (Icomos).

The Paris-based Icomos is one of Unesco’s two world heritage-monitoring arms.

Objections and revisions

The Met Conservation Committee, which is chaired by Manila Mayor Atienza, is composed of another representative from the city, two from the GSIS and two from the NCCA.

After the 2004 elections, the NCCA conducted a feasibility study, which included the inspection of the property and the preparation of pertinent documents.

In September the same year, the NCCA came up with the WAP. Angeles said that while the GSIS agreed with the WAP the following month, the City of Manila kept returning the draft to the NCCA with various objections and asking for revisions.

It was only in April 2005, “after much persuasion” that the NCCA was able to get City Hall to agree to the WAP, Angeles said.

Personally, however, the commissioner said she thought the contracts with City Hall were “strange” because by law, it’s the NCCA -- or more particularly, one of its member agencies, the National Historical Institute (NHI) -- that should conduct the restoration of landmarks.

Atienza’s track record

“The restoration is being turned over to a non-expert … so we have to ensure that City Hall complies with the highest standards of conservation,” she said, recalling that the Manila city government “does not exactly rank high” among conservationists and heritage-savers.

Angeles was referring to Atienza’s disagreements with the NCCA, the NHI, the National Museum and other government agencies and private groups on the preservation of “culturally significant” sites, such as the Jai-Alai Building, Mehan Garden, Arroceros Forest Park, the Paco and Tutuban train stations, and the San Lazaro racetrack.

The commissioner also said that people should not be suspicious or impatient if they don’t see any actual construction work at the Met just yet.

“Everything has to be in order … we want to be as close to the original as possible. We’ll make sure that much of the original remains there for the next generations to appreciate,” Angeles said.

Research work

The commissioner recounted that in the ongoing restoration work for the Montpelier estate of US President James Madison in Orange, Virginia, the research alone took two years, during which the building was not touched. The estate, which changed hands twice, would be restored to its 1820s version.

The seven-year restoration employed not just researchers but also assorted craftsmen, architects and even archaeologists.

“We do move slowly, yes, but the rewards will last longer. We want to restore the Met and make it usable. We want to make it sturdy so it will remain a symbol for a long, long time,” Angeles explained.

She said the P50 million that would be given to City Hall was also subject to government regulations on spending and auditing. The amount was not nearly enough for the Met’s complete restoration, which was estimated to be P200 million.

The NCCA released an initial P15 million, of which P1 million was earmarked for the full documentation of the Met.

Another P4 million was set for the detailed engineering study (DES), the contract for which was awarded to Schema Konsult Inc., a Pasig City-based engineering, planning and project management consultancy firm.

Old meets new

The remaining P10 million would be released to City Hall for the restoration of the theater roof, which is a primary concern. Also in the priority list are: raising the floor from floodwaters and checking the electrical system.

Angeles said the NCCA also wanted to conduct “a deeper investigation of the structure, to find out exactly what changes were made between the 1930s and the 1978 structure.”

“If you go in without a plan, you could lose architectural details and designs, and technological innovations that we might not have seen,” she explained.

Architecture scholar Edson Cabalfin said the culture expressed in the architectural style of a building constructed in a particular era is often the product of “intermingling and hybridization of cultures.”

Nationalists may point out that the Art Deco style of the Met was something foreign and forced upon by American colonizers. Not so, according to Cabalfin, author of a critical historiography of the Philippine Art Deco from 1927 to 1941.

He said the Met and the other Art Deco buildings served as expressions of the Filipino struggle for identity -- one that would blend Filipino, Asian, Spanish and American influences.

Met as symbol

“[A]s much as Art Deco is seen as the seeming ‘infiltration’ of a foreign agent in another culture, the style can also be read as the means an ‘infiltrated’ culture adapts and responds to an outside power,” Cabalfin explained.

Philippine Art Deco then, he added, can be understood as “the dynamics of the imposition of power by the colonizer and the demonstration of resistance and empowerment of the colonized.”

Angeles said the NCCA realized that its reputation was at stake with the Met restoration project.

“The Met is more than a theater. It is a symbol. If we screw up this one, we’ll never live it down. We’ll become known as the agency that ruined the Met. The people may forget the City of Manila or GSIS, but they will not forget the NCCA because this [restoration] is our mandate,” she said.
Wonderboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 02:40 PM   #3567
Wonderboy
a.k.a Escolta Kid
 
Wonderboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Manila
Posts: 2,260
Likes (Received): 2

The Black Legend: talk by Dr. William Summers

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Ateneo de Manila University

invites everyone to its

VISITING SCHOLAR LECTURE SERIES

featuring

Dr. William Summers

who will speak on

"The Black Legend In the Philippines Then and Now:
Defacing the Present to Perpetuate the Defacement of the Past"

30 November 2005, Wednesday, 4:30 p.m.
Conference Room 1 & 2, Ground Floor, Social Sciences Building
Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights, Quezon City

This paper raises the question of the continuing effects of the Black
Legend in contemporary historiography in the Philippines. The
contention is that the pernicious effect of this powerful,
essentializing prejudice can still be seen at work in the creation of
the current 'image of the Filipino'. After an examination of the
historic roots of this prejudice and its institutionalization within
the agencies of United States, especially the political and education
sectors, the implantation of this prejudice within the Philippines
through the agency of the occupation government is described. The
paper concludes with the contention that many of the conflicts
evident in the construction of 'Filipino' continue to suffer from or
are deformed by the ongoing effects of the Black Legend. By
unmasking this prejudice in its many guises, consideration of the
past and the future can be approached more freely and in an informed
manner.

William John Summers, Ph. D., has been conducting research on music
within the Philippines since 1996. His focus is on the music before
1898. He is the author of the book Fourteenth century English
Polyphonic Music, the author of four published studies on music in
the Philippines, including the first music encyclopedia article
written on Manila for the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians
(2001). He has published, in English and Spanish, more than 70
articles and reviews in U. S., Latin American, European and Filipino
periodicals. He has also contributed to five Congress Reports of the
International Musicological Society. He is the Coordinator of the
International Hispanic Music Study Group, founded in 1993. Since
1984 he has been on the faculty of music at Dartmouth College,
Hanover, NH, USA. Before that, he was on the faculty and Chair of the
Fine Arts Department, at Seattle University.

For more information, please call the DSA at 426-6001, local 5270 or 5271
Wonderboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 02:40 PM   #3568
Wonderboy
a.k.a Escolta Kid
 
Wonderboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Manila
Posts: 2,260
Likes (Received): 2

The Black Legend: talk by Dr. William Summers

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Ateneo de Manila University

invites everyone to its

VISITING SCHOLAR LECTURE SERIES

featuring

Dr. William Summers

who will speak on

"The Black Legend In the Philippines Then and Now:
Defacing the Present to Perpetuate the Defacement of the Past"

30 November 2005, Wednesday, 4:30 p.m.
Conference Room 1 & 2, Ground Floor, Social Sciences Building
Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights, Quezon City

This paper raises the question of the continuing effects of the Black
Legend in contemporary historiography in the Philippines. The
contention is that the pernicious effect of this powerful,
essentializing prejudice can still be seen at work in the creation of
the current 'image of the Filipino'. After an examination of the
historic roots of this prejudice and its institutionalization within
the agencies of United States, especially the political and education
sectors, the implantation of this prejudice within the Philippines
through the agency of the occupation government is described. The
paper concludes with the contention that many of the conflicts
evident in the construction of 'Filipino' continue to suffer from or
are deformed by the ongoing effects of the Black Legend. By
unmasking this prejudice in its many guises, consideration of the
past and the future can be approached more freely and in an informed
manner.

William John Summers, Ph. D., has been conducting research on music
within the Philippines since 1996. His focus is on the music before
1898. He is the author of the book Fourteenth century English
Polyphonic Music, the author of four published studies on music in
the Philippines, including the first music encyclopedia article
written on Manila for the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians
(2001). He has published, in English and Spanish, more than 70
articles and reviews in U. S., Latin American, European and Filipino
periodicals. He has also contributed to five Congress Reports of the
International Musicological Society. He is the Coordinator of the
International Hispanic Music Study Group, founded in 1993. Since
1984 he has been on the faculty of music at Dartmouth College,
Hanover, NH, USA. Before that, he was on the faculty and Chair of the
Fine Arts Department, at Seattle University.

For more information, please call the DSA at 426-6001, local 5270 or 5271
Wonderboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 02:48 PM   #3569
Animo
I'm Watching You
 
Animo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 9,646
Likes (Received): 140

Black Legend

The anti-Spanish Black Legend (in Spanish, leyenda negra) is the depiction of Spain and Spaniards as bloodthirsty and cruel, greedy and fanatical. The term was coined by Julián Juderías in his 1914 book La leyenda negra y la verdad histórica (The Black Legend and Historical Truth). Underlying the Black Legend and its propagation is the intention to defame Spaniards and Hispanics generally.

The Black Legend is distinguished from other similar hoaxes created throughout history by its extension, influence and persistence in time. The Legend influenced historical understanding and accounts in most European countries and, through them, much of the world. Its zenith may have come in the 16th century, but it effects can still be seen some 400 years later.

Other similar Roman Catholic nations, such as Portugal, have never been subjected to such treatment to the extent that the Spanish have been. The Inquisition was also active in Portugal, the Portuguese Jews were also expelled, slavery was more important in the Portuguese colonies than in the Spanish colonies, there were violent conquerors like Afonso de Albuquerque and brutal governors like Mem de Sá. Perhaps the long friendship between England and Portugal explains why these events and practices were not seen through the same lens as similar matters in Spain.

A White Legend (leyenda rosa in Spanish, literally, a "rosy" legend) is an historical account that depicts Spain or the Spanish people and their New World descendents in a very positive or highly favorable light. As propaganda there is no such White Legend comparable to the Black Legend in extension, influence or persistence in time.

---

A good read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_legend
Animo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 02:48 PM   #3570
Animo
I'm Watching You
 
Animo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 9,646
Likes (Received): 140

Black Legend

The anti-Spanish Black Legend (in Spanish, leyenda negra) is the depiction of Spain and Spaniards as bloodthirsty and cruel, greedy and fanatical. The term was coined by Julián Juderías in his 1914 book La leyenda negra y la verdad histórica (The Black Legend and Historical Truth). Underlying the Black Legend and its propagation is the intention to defame Spaniards and Hispanics generally.

The Black Legend is distinguished from other similar hoaxes created throughout history by its extension, influence and persistence in time. The Legend influenced historical understanding and accounts in most European countries and, through them, much of the world. Its zenith may have come in the 16th century, but it effects can still be seen some 400 years later.

Other similar Roman Catholic nations, such as Portugal, have never been subjected to such treatment to the extent that the Spanish have been. The Inquisition was also active in Portugal, the Portuguese Jews were also expelled, slavery was more important in the Portuguese colonies than in the Spanish colonies, there were violent conquerors like Afonso de Albuquerque and brutal governors like Mem de Sá. Perhaps the long friendship between England and Portugal explains why these events and practices were not seen through the same lens as similar matters in Spain.

A White Legend (leyenda rosa in Spanish, literally, a "rosy" legend) is an historical account that depicts Spain or the Spanish people and their New World descendents in a very positive or highly favorable light. As propaganda there is no such White Legend comparable to the Black Legend in extension, influence or persistence in time.

---

A good read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_legend
Animo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 03:04 PM   #3571
Animo
I'm Watching You
 
Animo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 9,646
Likes (Received): 140

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lili
^ Interesting.
2nd here! Have you also known about the coincidence that a man with blue eyes (considered as a god) will arrive at that date in present day Mexico (predicted by that society), if i remember it correctly.
Animo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 03:04 PM   #3572
Animo
I'm Watching You
 
Animo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 9,646
Likes (Received): 140

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lili
^ Interesting.
2nd here! Have you also known about the coincidence that a man with blue eyes (considered as a god) will arrive at that date in present day Mexico (predicted by that society), if i remember it correctly.
Animo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 05:05 PM   #3573
Hawayano
Registered User
 
Hawayano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 1,777
Likes (Received): 31

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderboy
Thanks for posting this pre-war postcard, Wonderboy--and thanks also for the Jai Alai article that preceded this posting. Now, if Atienza has it in him to be magnanimous enough (after demolishing Jai Alai for the most ineffective reasons), he could start by restoring Jones Bridge properly to the way it looked pre-war. The cheap and unsafe-looking attempt at restoration that was done can't come near the elegance of the lanterns, fretwork, sculpture and pylons that graced the bridge blown up in 1945. BTW, I know that the Luneta statue of Madre Filipinas right behind the Rizal monument is one that was salvaged, but does anyone know what happened to the four statues that flanked both end of the bridge before the war? I recall seeing a postwar reconstruction pic that showed at least two of them intact.
Hawayano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2005, 05:05 PM   #3574
Hawayano
Registered User
 
Hawayano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Honolulu
Posts: 1,777
Likes (Received): 31

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonderboy
Thanks for posting this pre-war postcard, Wonderboy--and thanks also for the Jai Alai article that preceded this posting. Now, if Atienza has it in him to be magnanimous enough (after demolishing Jai Alai for the most ineffective reasons), he could start by restoring Jones Bridge properly to the way it looked pre-war. The cheap and unsafe-looking attempt at restoration that was done can't come near the elegance of the lanterns, fretwork, sculpture and pylons that graced the bridge blown up in 1945. BTW, I know that the Luneta statue of Madre Filipinas right behind the Rizal monument is one that was salvaged, but does anyone know what happened to the four statues that flanked both end of the bridge before the war? I recall seeing a postwar reconstruction pic that showed at least two of them intact.
Hawayano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2005, 02:35 AM   #3575
Animo
I'm Watching You
 
Animo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 9,646
Likes (Received): 140

OT: 100 Years of Filipinos in Riverside

Riverside’s early Filipinos were often unseen and ignored. They brought cultural traditions that contributed to Riverside’s early multicultural foundation when they arrived in 1903. Currently, Filipinos constitute a significant minority group in the state. Despite their significance, Filipino contributions to Riverside development have not been completely acknowledged-- this centennial offers a rich montage of local Filipino life.

The strength and significance of the people and their culture is evident. Through the generations, the Filipinos and Filipino Americans who lived in Riverside, experienced a wide range of situations from acceptance to discrimination and yet they made important contributions to this community. They shattered formerly established myths and stereotypes held by the uninformed. The diversity of this immigrant population collectively attests that there is not a “generic” Filipino just a group of unique individuals.

Filipino cultural traditions have been passed through the generations enriching the lives of Riverside’s Filipino, Filipino American and non-Filipino population. The Filipinos assimilated into mainstream Riverside yet kept their strong cultural traditions. The community benefited greatly during the past 100 years from an ongoing connection through a series of immigrant waves between the Philippines and Riverside.

Christian Trajano, Filipino-American Historian
H. Vincent Moses, Ph. D., Director, Riverside Municipal Museum

PENSIONADOS: RIVERSIDE’S FIRST FILIPINOS



In 1903, 16 teenage boys became Riverside’s first Filipino residents. Part of a larger group of approximately 100 Filipinos known as the “Pensionados”, these students came to study in the United States. They were funded and/or pensioned by the Philippine government. Nearly all came from wealthy families. Each came from a different province and/or linguistic region of the Philippines. These students went to school in seven Southern California counties as an experiment to determine if they could adjust to the colder temperatures in the United States. Riverside’s “Pensionados” arrived on a chilly Thursday evening November 11, 1903. These Filipino teens had a significant impact on the community’s cultural activities.
Animo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2005, 02:35 AM   #3576
Animo
I'm Watching You
 
Animo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 9,646
Likes (Received): 140

OT: 100 Years of Filipinos in Riverside

Riverside’s early Filipinos were often unseen and ignored. They brought cultural traditions that contributed to Riverside’s early multicultural foundation when they arrived in 1903. Currently, Filipinos constitute a significant minority group in the state. Despite their significance, Filipino contributions to Riverside development have not been completely acknowledged-- this centennial offers a rich montage of local Filipino life.

The strength and significance of the people and their culture is evident. Through the generations, the Filipinos and Filipino Americans who lived in Riverside, experienced a wide range of situations from acceptance to discrimination and yet they made important contributions to this community. They shattered formerly established myths and stereotypes held by the uninformed. The diversity of this immigrant population collectively attests that there is not a “generic” Filipino just a group of unique individuals.

Filipino cultural traditions have been passed through the generations enriching the lives of Riverside’s Filipino, Filipino American and non-Filipino population. The Filipinos assimilated into mainstream Riverside yet kept their strong cultural traditions. The community benefited greatly during the past 100 years from an ongoing connection through a series of immigrant waves between the Philippines and Riverside.

Christian Trajano, Filipino-American Historian
H. Vincent Moses, Ph. D., Director, Riverside Municipal Museum

PENSIONADOS: RIVERSIDE’S FIRST FILIPINOS



In 1903, 16 teenage boys became Riverside’s first Filipino residents. Part of a larger group of approximately 100 Filipinos known as the “Pensionados”, these students came to study in the United States. They were funded and/or pensioned by the Philippine government. Nearly all came from wealthy families. Each came from a different province and/or linguistic region of the Philippines. These students went to school in seven Southern California counties as an experiment to determine if they could adjust to the colder temperatures in the United States. Riverside’s “Pensionados” arrived on a chilly Thursday evening November 11, 1903. These Filipino teens had a significant impact on the community’s cultural activities.
Animo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2005, 02:56 AM   #3577
Animo
I'm Watching You
 
Animo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 9,646
Likes (Received): 140

El Palacio y la Iglesia de Nuevo Baztán

Statues of Philippine ivories



Atesora la Iglesia tallas de marfiles filipinos, de la época de Goyeneche, con gran calidad artística. La más venerada es la del Cristo del Socorro, que preside el Vía Crucis de la Javierada, que desde el año 1977 organiza la Comisión de Navarros en Madrid y patrocina la Real Congregación de San Fermín de los Navarros. También son de admirar un San Juan Bautista, una Sagrada Familia y una Virgen con el Niño.

http://www.nuevobaztan.org/04palacio.html
Animo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2005, 02:56 AM   #3578
Animo
I'm Watching You
 
Animo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 9,646
Likes (Received): 140

El Palacio y la Iglesia de Nuevo Baztán

Statues of Philippine ivories



Atesora la Iglesia tallas de marfiles filipinos, de la época de Goyeneche, con gran calidad artística. La más venerada es la del Cristo del Socorro, que preside el Vía Crucis de la Javierada, que desde el año 1977 organiza la Comisión de Navarros en Madrid y patrocina la Real Congregación de San Fermín de los Navarros. También son de admirar un San Juan Bautista, una Sagrada Familia y una Virgen con el Niño.

http://www.nuevobaztan.org/04palacio.html
Animo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2005, 03:11 AM   #3579
bagel
Member, Winifred Fan Club
 
bagel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Posts: 2,801
Likes (Received): 33

Is that Riverside, California?
__________________

I am the original thread killer.
bagel no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2005, 03:11 AM   #3580
bagel
Member, Winifred Fan Club
 
bagel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Posts: 2,801
Likes (Received): 33

Is that Riverside, California?
__________________

I am the original thread killer.
bagel no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
fotos, makati, philippines, taguig

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu