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Old June 25th, 2005, 04:25 AM   #941
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The Coliseum -- is that the Araneta Coliseum in Cubao, Quezon City? I don't know of a coliseum in Manila. Thanks for the pictures, Nicodemus. It's good to see pictures of Manila in that era. There is also a thread on Philippines in the 70s for those in that decade.
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Old June 25th, 2005, 04:25 AM   #942
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The Coliseum -- is that the Araneta Coliseum in Cubao, Quezon City? I don't know of a coliseum in Manila. Thanks for the pictures, Nicodemus. It's good to see pictures of Manila in that era. There is also a thread on Philippines in the 70s for those in that decade.
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Old June 25th, 2005, 04:49 AM   #943
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An article I got from the Philippine Daily Inquirer



Sense and Sensibility : Manila in 1859


First posted 01:32am (Mla time) June 25, 2005
By Bambi Harper
Inquirer News Service



Editor's Note: Published on page A15 of the June 25, 2005 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

(As we lose more and more of the landmarks of Manila with nary a peep from her so-called leaders, her beginnings are now no more than shadows of a murky past contributing to our historical amnesia. The ties that bind us to our antecedents are tenuous at best. As familiar signposts of the past are bulldozed into oblivion, with historical street names replaced by names of self-seeking mediocre politicians, at least the written word may leave a trace of its storied yesteryears. Unlike other Southeast Asian countries that realized the potential of their colonial inner cities as tourist attractions and recognized the indispensable function of parks and open spaces, Manila demolished historic landmark buildings and neighborhoods and replaced them with literally a concrete jungle dominated by bland high rises that imprison its inhabitants to protect them from the islands of transient poor living in cardboard lean-tos and make-shift carts. It is a sorry excuse for a capital and presumably
the premier city of the Philippines once called The Pearl of the Orient. Pity that its colonial masters believed in city gardens for the people but its native rulers hear nothing but the tinkling of cash registers.)

MANILA, despite not being particularly extensive in dimensions, was still the most populated of the archipelago. Situated on the western part of the island of Luzon between Laguna de Bay and the bay called de Manila, it was the great receptacle of the waters of Oceano. On the west, it was enclosed by the sierras of Mariveles and to the south by Pico de Loro. Sandwiched at the opening to the bay at the center between the two points was the island of Corregidor.

Into Manila flowed abundant torrents from rivers, principally the Pasig, that of la Pampanga, of Pasac and Orani and several in the province of Cavite. Manila was limited by the bay on the west, by the district of Morong and the great Laguna de Bay on the east. On the south, the towns of Las Piñas and Bacood separated her from the province of Cavite. The limits to the north were Bulacan, starting from the bridge of Tinajeros, following the river of Tala or Tanza that descended from the slopes of the mountains of San Mateo flowing onto the bay through the towns of Malabon or Tambobo and the barrio of Tonsuya.

On the right side of the riverbank about a foot and a half from its source, the two arms of Bamban and Taguig, shortly after being reunited, formed the river called San Mateo that was born in the mountains of the same name. After having traversed many ravines and forming a thousand tortuous brooks and rivulets of little known names, the San Mateo followed a constant direction to the southeast, irrigating the towns of San Mateo and Mariquina with the barrios of Santolan and Maybonga until it flowed into the Pasig.

The San Mateo, detached from the long cordillera of the Caraballo Range, had huge abutments that ran from the northeast to the southeast and ended in the province of Albay and Mt. Bulusan. In the abutments were formed the towns of San Mateo and Mariquina, Caloocan and Pasig, San Francisco and San Juan del Monte. Manila was the great plain that extended from the skirts of the San Mateo Mountains to the extensive bay. These abutments tapered down little by little until they were no more than smooth hills like Guadalupe and San Pedro Makati that reached the outskirts of the capital.

All these springs from the Cordilleras gave rise to the following rivers and arroyos:

The River Pasig, born in Laguna de Bay and running some three leagues, discharged its waters into the bay. It formed various branches, the most abundant being those of Pateros and Taguig and the Bamban that formed the one called Napindan. There were two other smaller arms, one in the town of Taytay and another called Tipas.

The branch called Bamban passed through many plains until the barrio of the same name belonging to the town of Pasig, with a pleasant vista in its banks, and joining with that of Pateros and Taguig flowed through the neighborhoods of both towns uniting with the Pasig River in the northeast. It passed through the picturesque hills of Guadalupe and the towns of San Pedro Makati with the barrios of San Pedrillo and San Felipe or Mandaluyong until it reached the town of Sta. Ana on its left bank while Mandaluyong continued on its right.

Reaching the fertile fields of the island of Pandacan, it continued westward towards the town of San Miguel until it reached the smaller isle of Convalencia situated at the center of the river. Directing itself from this point to the northeast, it reached Santa Cruz on its right banks and the Cuartel of the Fortin [little fort] on the left and flowed westward to the bay.

Throughout its path, the River Pasig presented the most varied landscapes, adorning the banks with the most exuberant and rich vegetation wherein was found hamlets of country houses.

There were two bridges over this river. One that was very modern and made of iron, called the Suspension Bridge, crossed in front of Manila from the Paseo de Isabel II to the town of Quiapo. The other, which was quite old and made of stone, led from the capital to the towns of Binondo, Tondo, Santa Cruz, Quiapo, Sampaloc and was the gateway to the northern part of the province.

(Data from "La Ilustracion Filipina," 1859)
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Old June 25th, 2005, 04:49 AM   #944
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An article I got from the Philippine Daily Inquirer



Sense and Sensibility : Manila in 1859


First posted 01:32am (Mla time) June 25, 2005
By Bambi Harper
Inquirer News Service



Editor's Note: Published on page A15 of the June 25, 2005 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

(As we lose more and more of the landmarks of Manila with nary a peep from her so-called leaders, her beginnings are now no more than shadows of a murky past contributing to our historical amnesia. The ties that bind us to our antecedents are tenuous at best. As familiar signposts of the past are bulldozed into oblivion, with historical street names replaced by names of self-seeking mediocre politicians, at least the written word may leave a trace of its storied yesteryears. Unlike other Southeast Asian countries that realized the potential of their colonial inner cities as tourist attractions and recognized the indispensable function of parks and open spaces, Manila demolished historic landmark buildings and neighborhoods and replaced them with literally a concrete jungle dominated by bland high rises that imprison its inhabitants to protect them from the islands of transient poor living in cardboard lean-tos and make-shift carts. It is a sorry excuse for a capital and presumably
the premier city of the Philippines once called The Pearl of the Orient. Pity that its colonial masters believed in city gardens for the people but its native rulers hear nothing but the tinkling of cash registers.)

MANILA, despite not being particularly extensive in dimensions, was still the most populated of the archipelago. Situated on the western part of the island of Luzon between Laguna de Bay and the bay called de Manila, it was the great receptacle of the waters of Oceano. On the west, it was enclosed by the sierras of Mariveles and to the south by Pico de Loro. Sandwiched at the opening to the bay at the center between the two points was the island of Corregidor.

Into Manila flowed abundant torrents from rivers, principally the Pasig, that of la Pampanga, of Pasac and Orani and several in the province of Cavite. Manila was limited by the bay on the west, by the district of Morong and the great Laguna de Bay on the east. On the south, the towns of Las Piñas and Bacood separated her from the province of Cavite. The limits to the north were Bulacan, starting from the bridge of Tinajeros, following the river of Tala or Tanza that descended from the slopes of the mountains of San Mateo flowing onto the bay through the towns of Malabon or Tambobo and the barrio of Tonsuya.

On the right side of the riverbank about a foot and a half from its source, the two arms of Bamban and Taguig, shortly after being reunited, formed the river called San Mateo that was born in the mountains of the same name. After having traversed many ravines and forming a thousand tortuous brooks and rivulets of little known names, the San Mateo followed a constant direction to the southeast, irrigating the towns of San Mateo and Mariquina with the barrios of Santolan and Maybonga until it flowed into the Pasig.

The San Mateo, detached from the long cordillera of the Caraballo Range, had huge abutments that ran from the northeast to the southeast and ended in the province of Albay and Mt. Bulusan. In the abutments were formed the towns of San Mateo and Mariquina, Caloocan and Pasig, San Francisco and San Juan del Monte. Manila was the great plain that extended from the skirts of the San Mateo Mountains to the extensive bay. These abutments tapered down little by little until they were no more than smooth hills like Guadalupe and San Pedro Makati that reached the outskirts of the capital.

All these springs from the Cordilleras gave rise to the following rivers and arroyos:

The River Pasig, born in Laguna de Bay and running some three leagues, discharged its waters into the bay. It formed various branches, the most abundant being those of Pateros and Taguig and the Bamban that formed the one called Napindan. There were two other smaller arms, one in the town of Taytay and another called Tipas.

The branch called Bamban passed through many plains until the barrio of the same name belonging to the town of Pasig, with a pleasant vista in its banks, and joining with that of Pateros and Taguig flowed through the neighborhoods of both towns uniting with the Pasig River in the northeast. It passed through the picturesque hills of Guadalupe and the towns of San Pedro Makati with the barrios of San Pedrillo and San Felipe or Mandaluyong until it reached the town of Sta. Ana on its left bank while Mandaluyong continued on its right.

Reaching the fertile fields of the island of Pandacan, it continued westward towards the town of San Miguel until it reached the smaller isle of Convalencia situated at the center of the river. Directing itself from this point to the northeast, it reached Santa Cruz on its right banks and the Cuartel of the Fortin [little fort] on the left and flowed westward to the bay.

Throughout its path, the River Pasig presented the most varied landscapes, adorning the banks with the most exuberant and rich vegetation wherein was found hamlets of country houses.

There were two bridges over this river. One that was very modern and made of iron, called the Suspension Bridge, crossed in front of Manila from the Paseo de Isabel II to the town of Quiapo. The other, which was quite old and made of stone, led from the capital to the towns of Binondo, Tondo, Santa Cruz, Quiapo, Sampaloc and was the gateway to the northern part of the province.

(Data from "La Ilustracion Filipina," 1859)
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Old June 30th, 2005, 06:29 AM   #945
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Again, from the Philippine Daily Inquirer




Sense and Sensibility : Manila 1859 (2)

First posted 10:01pm (Mla time) June 27, 2005
By Bambi Harper
Inquirer News Service



Editor's Note: Published on Page A11 of the June 28, 2005 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

(This article gives you an idea why Daniel Burnham described Manila as another Venice. Aside from names of towns, streets and bridges that are no more, it also projects a topography alien to its present features but it may impart an image of the city of our ancestors.)

THE RIVER Tala or Tanza divides Manila from Bulacan and discharges into the bay in the towns of Malabon or Tambobo and its barrio of Tonsuyo. At this point, from the confluence of various rivulets and streams, the lake called Dagat-dagatan is formed. A branch line, following a north-to-south direction, subdivides into various others and meanders through the neighborhoods of the town of Tondo where there is a place called Gayalangui with a small spring of sweet water.

It enters into Binondo through the bridge called Aceiteros, divides the streets parallel to those of Jolo and Anloague and exits into the Pasig near Manila Bay above the bridge they call Grande. Before that, it passes under another bridge
that crosses from the church of Binondo to the streets of San Fernando and Sto. Cristo. On the right banks of the Pasig near Manila, an infinity of rivulets or streams with many windings and detours flow around the towns of Quiapo, San Miguel, Sta. Cruz and Binondo

The stream that passes through Tondo and Binondo separates into various branches before reaching the Aceiteros Bridge, uniting on its left banks with another that flows through the visitas and barrios of Tutuban, San Rafael, San Nicolas and Sta. Cruz. Past the bridge, it is joined by the esteros that surround the island of Meisic, slipping under the bridge called de la Magdalena or de Trozo, which from the barrio of Trozo (in the town of San Jose) goes to Dulungbayan in Sta. Cruz.

Another arm of the arroyo that forms around Meisic receives water from another branch that descends from the north and together they surround the island of Sibacon, which together with the island of Romero makes up the town of Santa Cruz. These two esteros then flow under the bridge called Visita in the Escolta that connects to Sta. Cruz and from there spill out to the Pasig. Other rivulets pass under the Sibacon Bridge, including another that originates from San Lazaro and San Jose which runs under the new span called Urrejola behind the Tribunal.

A plain exists between the town of Santa Cruz and the barrio of San Sebastian, where another current divides itself into two branches. One of these branches flows into Santa Cruz beside the street called Quiotan where there is a bridge to the island of Romero and later crosses under the Carriedo Bridge on the street of Real de Quiapo going toward General Crespo and passing through another bridge beside the Alcaldia of the province before veering to the left and discharging into the Pasig.

The other arm descends from Quiapo and has a bridge over it at the entrance of the Calzada of San Sebastian beyond which it meanders along the backs of the houses in Gunao. It merges with three other streams in front of the church of San Sebastian and together they flow behind the houses fronting the church.

A new bridge in Looban that leads to Curtidor spans another rivulet that passes through the landing beside another bridge found at the end of the Calzada of San Sebastian, isolating the houses there.

Once these streams unite, they exit into the Pasig through the De la Quinta Bridge that also leads to San Miguel. Before reaching that barrio, there is a picturesque isle in front of which the streams are joined by an estero that is born above the northern part of the town of Sampaloc. Following its currents parallel to the back of the houses, it passes under the bridge of Marquez with a branch that extends in front of the church of San Sebastian where it unites with the others.

Another arm goes toward San Miguel and turns to the right discharging in front of Isla de la Convalecencia beside the bridge of La Quinta. Still another branch opens into the Pasig near the barrio of Ule-ule where a rivulet born in the pastures of Nagtahan forms a confluence with them.

Between the immediate outskirts of Parañaque and this branch of the River Pasig, a small but very long brook with little water drifts which due to its tortuous turns that resemble intestines is called Tripa de Gallina. It flows under the bridges of Dilao and Paco as well as another bridge called de las Damas between Paco and Santa Ana and joins the Pasig in front of the Isla de la Convalecencia.

Another small stream known as the Bago River divides the towns of Paco and Malate through San Anton and forms salt beds behind these town. A branch runs parallel to the Paseo de la Calzada, discharging into the Pasig in the place of San Miguel el Viejo and from there a short arm called Canal de Balete passes under two small bridges.

Beside the town of San Juan del Monte is a spring from which flow medicinal waters that are much in demand in Manila and its suburbs.

Another spring of mineral water containing iron descends from the skirts of a hill covered by the most luxurious vegetation beside the town of Mariquina. It is famous because of its medicinal properties.

(Data from La Ilustracion Filipina, 1859).
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Old June 30th, 2005, 06:29 AM   #946
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Again, from the Philippine Daily Inquirer




Sense and Sensibility : Manila 1859 (2)

First posted 10:01pm (Mla time) June 27, 2005
By Bambi Harper
Inquirer News Service



Editor's Note: Published on Page A11 of the June 28, 2005 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

(This article gives you an idea why Daniel Burnham described Manila as another Venice. Aside from names of towns, streets and bridges that are no more, it also projects a topography alien to its present features but it may impart an image of the city of our ancestors.)

THE RIVER Tala or Tanza divides Manila from Bulacan and discharges into the bay in the towns of Malabon or Tambobo and its barrio of Tonsuyo. At this point, from the confluence of various rivulets and streams, the lake called Dagat-dagatan is formed. A branch line, following a north-to-south direction, subdivides into various others and meanders through the neighborhoods of the town of Tondo where there is a place called Gayalangui with a small spring of sweet water.

It enters into Binondo through the bridge called Aceiteros, divides the streets parallel to those of Jolo and Anloague and exits into the Pasig near Manila Bay above the bridge they call Grande. Before that, it passes under another bridge
that crosses from the church of Binondo to the streets of San Fernando and Sto. Cristo. On the right banks of the Pasig near Manila, an infinity of rivulets or streams with many windings and detours flow around the towns of Quiapo, San Miguel, Sta. Cruz and Binondo

The stream that passes through Tondo and Binondo separates into various branches before reaching the Aceiteros Bridge, uniting on its left banks with another that flows through the visitas and barrios of Tutuban, San Rafael, San Nicolas and Sta. Cruz. Past the bridge, it is joined by the esteros that surround the island of Meisic, slipping under the bridge called de la Magdalena or de Trozo, which from the barrio of Trozo (in the town of San Jose) goes to Dulungbayan in Sta. Cruz.

Another arm of the arroyo that forms around Meisic receives water from another branch that descends from the north and together they surround the island of Sibacon, which together with the island of Romero makes up the town of Santa Cruz. These two esteros then flow under the bridge called Visita in the Escolta that connects to Sta. Cruz and from there spill out to the Pasig. Other rivulets pass under the Sibacon Bridge, including another that originates from San Lazaro and San Jose which runs under the new span called Urrejola behind the Tribunal.

A plain exists between the town of Santa Cruz and the barrio of San Sebastian, where another current divides itself into two branches. One of these branches flows into Santa Cruz beside the street called Quiotan where there is a bridge to the island of Romero and later crosses under the Carriedo Bridge on the street of Real de Quiapo going toward General Crespo and passing through another bridge beside the Alcaldia of the province before veering to the left and discharging into the Pasig.

The other arm descends from Quiapo and has a bridge over it at the entrance of the Calzada of San Sebastian beyond which it meanders along the backs of the houses in Gunao. It merges with three other streams in front of the church of San Sebastian and together they flow behind the houses fronting the church.

A new bridge in Looban that leads to Curtidor spans another rivulet that passes through the landing beside another bridge found at the end of the Calzada of San Sebastian, isolating the houses there.

Once these streams unite, they exit into the Pasig through the De la Quinta Bridge that also leads to San Miguel. Before reaching that barrio, there is a picturesque isle in front of which the streams are joined by an estero that is born above the northern part of the town of Sampaloc. Following its currents parallel to the back of the houses, it passes under the bridge of Marquez with a branch that extends in front of the church of San Sebastian where it unites with the others.

Another arm goes toward San Miguel and turns to the right discharging in front of Isla de la Convalecencia beside the bridge of La Quinta. Still another branch opens into the Pasig near the barrio of Ule-ule where a rivulet born in the pastures of Nagtahan forms a confluence with them.

Between the immediate outskirts of Parañaque and this branch of the River Pasig, a small but very long brook with little water drifts which due to its tortuous turns that resemble intestines is called Tripa de Gallina. It flows under the bridges of Dilao and Paco as well as another bridge called de las Damas between Paco and Santa Ana and joins the Pasig in front of the Isla de la Convalecencia.

Another small stream known as the Bago River divides the towns of Paco and Malate through San Anton and forms salt beds behind these town. A branch runs parallel to the Paseo de la Calzada, discharging into the Pasig in the place of San Miguel el Viejo and from there a short arm called Canal de Balete passes under two small bridges.

Beside the town of San Juan del Monte is a spring from which flow medicinal waters that are much in demand in Manila and its suburbs.

Another spring of mineral water containing iron descends from the skirts of a hill covered by the most luxurious vegetation beside the town of Mariquina. It is famous because of its medicinal properties.

(Data from La Ilustracion Filipina, 1859).
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Old June 30th, 2005, 07:07 AM   #947
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wow, the 60's manila remind me of havana =)

i didnt know that the rizal mo ument used to be higher
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Old June 30th, 2005, 07:07 AM   #948
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wow, the 60's manila remind me of havana =)

i didnt know that the rizal mo ument used to be higher
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Old June 30th, 2005, 11:12 AM   #949
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I read elsewhere that the extension on the Rizal Monument was installed sometime in the 60s and was lit at night. But because there was a lot of criticism, it was eventually removed. The government actually listened in those days..
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Old June 30th, 2005, 11:12 AM   #950
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I read elsewhere that the extension on the Rizal Monument was installed sometime in the 60s and was lit at night. But because there was a lot of criticism, it was eventually removed. The government actually listened in those days..
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Old June 30th, 2005, 12:31 PM   #951
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It was actually designed by national architect Juan Nakpil as part of a celebration of Rizal's centenary year (1961). I read somewhere that the aluminum addition was meant to reflect the forward and future looking times of the Philippines of the 1960s, and so that Rizal's monument doesn't lose out to the shiny new buildings popping up around it.


from http://www.ncca.gov.ph/culture&arts/infocus/rizal.htm
The stainless steel shaft

During Rizal’s (birth) centenary year in 1961, a controversial stainless steel shaft/pylon was superimposed over the granite obelisk. This increased the height of the structure from 12.7 meters to 30. 5 meters.

The said remodeling undertaken by the Jose Rizal National Centennial Commission (JRNCC) was widely criticized. It drew derisive remarks of it being “carnivalistic,” “nightmarish,” “commercialized,” “pseudo modern,” “hodgepodge of classic and Hollywood modern,” “fintailed monstrosity,” and “like a futuristic rocket ship about to take off for interstellar space,” to cite some.

Many found the gleaming modernistic steel shaft incompatible with the somber granite base. Moreover, the latter seemed to dwarf the much smaller Rizal figure. Others simply dislike the idea of tampering with a popular and traditional image, which was already immortalized in stamps, paper currency, books and souvenirs, among others.

The designer of the remodeling was Juan F. Nakpil – later to become the country’s first National Artist for Architecture. He quoted former Secretary of Education and JRNCC chair Manuel Lim as the one who “envisioned it as a part of obelisk that will jut out to serve as a convenient guide for incoming boats and ships and for the people lost in their way around the city.”

The P145,000 shaft was eventually removed two years later under the request of Secretary of Education Alejandro Roces and Director of Public Libraries Carlos Quirino. It was dismantled during the Holy Week “reportedly to prevent any court injunction from restraining them as government offices were closed during holidays.

Until a few years ago, the pylon stood on Roxas Boulevard to mark the Pasay-Parañaque boundary. Its present whereabouts are uncertain.
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Old June 30th, 2005, 12:31 PM   #952
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It was actually designed by national architect Juan Nakpil as part of a celebration of Rizal's centenary year (1961). I read somewhere that the aluminum addition was meant to reflect the forward and future looking times of the Philippines of the 1960s, and so that Rizal's monument doesn't lose out to the shiny new buildings popping up around it.


from http://www.ncca.gov.ph/culture&arts/infocus/rizal.htm
The stainless steel shaft

During Rizal’s (birth) centenary year in 1961, a controversial stainless steel shaft/pylon was superimposed over the granite obelisk. This increased the height of the structure from 12.7 meters to 30. 5 meters.

The said remodeling undertaken by the Jose Rizal National Centennial Commission (JRNCC) was widely criticized. It drew derisive remarks of it being “carnivalistic,” “nightmarish,” “commercialized,” “pseudo modern,” “hodgepodge of classic and Hollywood modern,” “fintailed monstrosity,” and “like a futuristic rocket ship about to take off for interstellar space,” to cite some.

Many found the gleaming modernistic steel shaft incompatible with the somber granite base. Moreover, the latter seemed to dwarf the much smaller Rizal figure. Others simply dislike the idea of tampering with a popular and traditional image, which was already immortalized in stamps, paper currency, books and souvenirs, among others.

The designer of the remodeling was Juan F. Nakpil – later to become the country’s first National Artist for Architecture. He quoted former Secretary of Education and JRNCC chair Manuel Lim as the one who “envisioned it as a part of obelisk that will jut out to serve as a convenient guide for incoming boats and ships and for the people lost in their way around the city.”

The P145,000 shaft was eventually removed two years later under the request of Secretary of Education Alejandro Roces and Director of Public Libraries Carlos Quirino. It was dismantled during the Holy Week “reportedly to prevent any court injunction from restraining them as government offices were closed during holidays.

Until a few years ago, the pylon stood on Roxas Boulevard to mark the Pasay-Parañaque boundary. Its present whereabouts are uncertain.
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Old July 1st, 2005, 05:25 AM   #953
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Wow, that's got quite a lot of history doesn't it? I've never seen this anyone got a photo?
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Old July 1st, 2005, 05:25 AM   #954
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Wow, that's got quite a lot of history doesn't it? I've never seen this anyone got a photo?
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Old July 1st, 2005, 10:37 AM   #955
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Now I remember the pylon that stood at the boundary of Paranaque and Pasay! It was located on Roxas Blvd. near Baclaran Church. Thanks for the info!
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Old July 1st, 2005, 10:37 AM   #956
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Now I remember the pylon that stood at the boundary of Paranaque and Pasay! It was located on Roxas Blvd. near Baclaran Church. Thanks for the info!
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Old July 1st, 2005, 10:54 AM   #957
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Somehow I like that extension on the Rizal monument but obviously it wasn't popular back then. What I dont like are the ones being done on our churches. From canopies, to statues, to cloisters/seminaries being added. Such low class tacky additions and without regard to the actual structure.
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Old July 1st, 2005, 10:54 AM   #958
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[/QUOTE]

Somehow I like that extension on the Rizal monument but obviously it wasn't popular back then. What I dont like are the ones being done on our churches. From canopies, to statues, to cloisters/seminaries being added. Such low class tacky additions and without regard to the actual structure.
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Old July 1st, 2005, 07:39 PM   #959
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i dont like the look either... i dunno, it looks...different, even scary

so this was how rizal park looked like in 1961? just a huge area of plain grass?

i like the aerial foto of araneta coliseum, it clearly showed the Phils. had an extensive network of very good, clean roads back then. absolutely no traffic!!
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Old July 1st, 2005, 07:39 PM   #960
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i dont like the look either... i dunno, it looks...different, even scary

so this was how rizal park looked like in 1961? just a huge area of plain grass?

i like the aerial foto of araneta coliseum, it clearly showed the Phils. had an extensive network of very good, clean roads back then. absolutely no traffic!!
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