daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture

Architecture news and discussions on all buildings types and urban spaces
» Classic Architecture | European Classic Architecture and Landscapes | Public Space | Shopping Architecture | Design & Lifestyle | Urban Renewal and Redevelopment



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 28th, 2006, 03:50 PM   #21
Manila-X
PINOY MOD
 
Manila-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: MANILA
Posts: 14,388
Likes (Received): 2584

Anyway, back to the creative talk, if not HK high-rises, how about HK low/mid-rise architecture

Here are some of my favorites

HK Cultural Centre


HKUST


HK Academy for The Performing Arts


Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre
__________________
Manila X-Perience, My collection of images around Metro Manila

Representing The Pinoy Community here in SSC!
Manila-X no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 28th, 2006, 09:56 PM   #22
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,508
Likes (Received): 17834

Hong Kong's most famous lowrise perhaps is Chek Lap Kok Airport :





__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 28th, 2006, 10:02 PM   #23
Castle_Bravo
Urban experience...
 
Castle_Bravo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Warsaw (PL) / Utrecht (NL)
Posts: 2,278
Likes (Received): 200

I like Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre very much...
BTW:I think that the Lippo (is it a company, or only the name of the building??) building is also very creativ.
__________________
Odgadnij wysokość
Castle_Bravo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2006, 02:05 AM   #24
Skybean
天豆
 
Skybean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 9,938
Likes (Received): 271

Quote:
Originally Posted by Castle_Bravo
I like Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre very much...
BTW:I think that the Lippo (is it a company, or only the name of the building??) building is also very creativ.
Yes, I agree. I was very young when I first saw Lippo Centre and it just wowed me. These buildings are often overlooked though, even though they are not too short in height.



Jardine House is also quite distinctive with its circular windows. Even less well known towers are quite creative. One that comes to mind is the tower beside the main Peak Tram station. Also the quirky multicoloured explosion tower in North Point
__________________
My Photos」 ● Hong Kong 1|2|3 ● Macau 1 ● London 1 ● New York City 1
Photo Threads」 ● Flying Over Hong KongCity Life Series」 ● Hong KongShanghaiSeoulTokyo
Skybean no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2006, 04:29 AM   #25
Manila-X
PINOY MOD
 
Manila-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: MANILA
Posts: 14,388
Likes (Received): 2584

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Hong Kong's most famous lowrise perhaps is Chek Lap Kok Airport :
It's debatable. But I disagree with this one. To me it's the HK Convention and Exhibition Centre since thats where the handover ceremonies was held.
__________________
Manila X-Perience, My collection of images around Metro Manila

Representing The Pinoy Community here in SSC!
Manila-X no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2006, 04:30 AM   #26
Manila-X
PINOY MOD
 
Manila-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: MANILA
Posts: 14,388
Likes (Received): 2584

Quote:
Originally Posted by Castle_Bravo
I like Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre very much...
BTW:I think that the Lippo (is it a company, or only the name of the building??) building is also very creativ.
Both. The Lippo Group of Companies is actually an Indonesian group that first specialized in banking and then turned to property development.

Anyway, the original name of the building is The Bond Centre which was developed by Australian millionaire, Alan Bond. The Lippo Group of Companies bought the building after Bond was imprisoned for several offenses.
__________________
Manila X-Perience, My collection of images around Metro Manila

Representing The Pinoy Community here in SSC!
Manila-X no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2006, 05:34 AM   #27
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,508
Likes (Received): 17834

Quote:
Originally Posted by WANCH
It's debatable. But I disagree with this one. To me it's the HK Convention and Exhibition Centre since thats where the handover ceremonies was held.
HKIA is the entry point for many visitors. They are far more likely to go through the airport than the HKCEC, so the airport gets more visual recognition. HKIA also has won far more facility awards than HKCEC, especially in recent years in the AETRA and Skytrax rankings.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2006, 06:26 AM   #28
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,508
Likes (Received): 17834

Architecture .. the Hong Kong Experience
http://intro2arch.arch.hku.hk/

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2006, 06:33 AM   #29
Manila-X
PINOY MOD
 
Manila-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: MANILA
Posts: 14,388
Likes (Received): 2584

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
HKIA is the entry point for many visitors. They are far more likely to go through the airport than the HKCEC, so the airport gets more visual recognition. HKIA also has won far more facility awards than HKCEC, especially in recent years in the AETRA and Skytrax rankings.
Very true. I think HK is very creative when it comes to post modern architecture but I also like the city's classical architecture and it's strong British influence.

Anyway, do you think that major corporations are better off hiring local firms in constructing their skyscrapers than hiring the big ones like Sir Norman Foster or Cesar Pelli?
__________________
Manila X-Perience, My collection of images around Metro Manila

Representing The Pinoy Community here in SSC!
Manila-X no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2006, 06:41 AM   #30
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,508
Likes (Received): 17834

Quote:
Originally Posted by WANCH
Very true. I think HK is very creative when it comes to post modern architecture but I also like the city's classical architecture and it's strong British influence.

Anyway, do you think that major corporations are better off hiring local firms in constructing their skyscrapers than hiring the big ones like Sir Norman Foster or Cesar Pelli?
Bringing in foreign talent is essential to incorporate international ideas in Hong Kong's architecture. That is part of Hong Kong's role as an international financial centre. There is also a major local architecture firm. Dennis Lau's firm designed Central Plaza, Highcliff, and Summit.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2006, 08:23 AM   #31
Manila-X
PINOY MOD
 
Manila-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: MANILA
Posts: 14,388
Likes (Received): 2584

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Bringing in foreign talent is essential to incorporate international ideas in Hong Kong's architecture. That is part of Hong Kong's role as an international financial centre. There is also a major local architecture firm. Dennis Lau's firm designed Central Plaza, Highcliff, and Summit.
True about international architects but I think local architectural firms can also have potential as well internationally. Like Dennis Lau for example.
__________________
Manila X-Perience, My collection of images around Metro Manila

Representing The Pinoy Community here in SSC!
Manila-X no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2006, 05:44 PM   #32
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,508
Likes (Received): 17834

Quote:
Originally Posted by WANCH
True about international architects but I think local architectural firms can also have potential as well internationally. Like Dennis Lau for example.
Hong Kong is far too small to support a huge local architecture firm like SOM or Foster & Partners. However, there are some prominent projects done by locals like Dennis Lau and another local firm :

Ronald Lu & Partners



Recent Projects
Asiaworld Expo
Tung Chung & Ngong Ping cable car stations
HK Disneyland Hotel
1 Ho Man Tin Hill
Monte Vista
Peak Tower revitalization
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 3rd, 2006, 08:25 PM   #33
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,508
Likes (Received): 17834

Fung shui plays a major role in Hong Kong's architectural designs :

Go with the flow
The ancient Chinese art of fung shui is intertwined with the property business

29 March 2006
South China Morning Post

Our town is famously hard working, business-driven, pragmatic and hell bent on keeping abreast of global trends, be they derived from Finnish telephone technology, Tokyo Shibuya fashion or the latest pop culture from Seoul.

But for all its modernity, aspects of ancient Chinese lore endure in this futuristic metropolis. And nowhere is this more evident than in the city's fascination with fung shui, a belief system that somehow co-exists with Hong Kong's worship of property development and über-modern architecture.

Fung shui (literally "wind and water"), also known as Chinese geomancy, is a serious field. Professional practitioners enjoy the same high standing in the community as doctors and lawyers, and few self-respecting local companies move into new premises without consulting the geomancer. In fact, many western companies have taken a "when-in-Rome" approach and invest considerable sums to ensure everything is in fung shui order.

Because of its remarkable topography, Hong Kong is said to be a nexus point for strong spiritual forces, benign and otherwise. So this is both prime geomancy territory and prime real-estate territory.

The combination of both continues to generate huge business between the city's geomancers, who draw their knowledge from the arts and sciences of bygone times, and the developers and architects, who draw up their plans to reflect the latest in construction technology and design. All this might seem incongruous to the Hong Kong visitor, but to the rest of us it is part of the fabric of our society.

Geomancers are called in to advise on the location and shape of buildings, as well as the configuration of rooms, doorways and even furniture. They also determine auspicious dates for ceremonies. Above all, the geomancer is concerned with the factors that can affect health, harmony and - let's not forget where we are - prosperity.

One widely held fung shui belief is that corporate chiefs should not have offices that face westward, otherwise company profits will follow the setting sun. Another is that homes and businesses should have a view of calm water - hence the goldfish tanks in many buildings where the view of the sea is blocked.

According to fung shui, the earth is a living organism. Its breath is the chi, the life-spirit or "dragon vapour". Geographical features and their orientation are of great significance.

After all, it was China that invented the world's first compass, and not for navigation but for geomancy.

The cityscape also comes into fung shui consideration.

More than a few buildings in Hong Kong are said to have "bad" fung shui, while some have had their fung shui improved.

When the Hopewell Centre in Wan Chai was completed in 1980, it became the tallest structure in Hong Kong. It also caused considerable alarm because the tall white office building looked like a white candle, a symbol of death in local Chinese culture. To counteract the negative chi implied by the building's shape, the architect was instructed to include a pool in the roof's design. According to fung shui, water puts out fire and consequently deflects bad vibes.

On the other side of the island, in Repulse Bay, is a huge and striking apartment block - with an enormous square "hole" in its centre. The hole was included because the complex was built "too close to the mountainside", where dragons reside and also because of the presence of the ocean on the other side. The dragons would not have taken it kindly if they were cut off from the water.

There are good and bad locations for siting houses on slopes, and these may be based on sound practicalities as well as the strictures of the spirits. Ideally, a house should be located on a south-facing slope, flanked by high ground. Such a setting ensures sunshine, shelter from the north winds howling through China in winter, and protection from floods.

Anything that geographically resembles "the dragon's tail" should be avoided, lest the beast knock the house down with an angry flick of its tail, a belief that may have its roots in China's more seismically active areas. A meandering river below ensures that wealth accumulates. There will probably be deposits of rich silt along its bank, providing for productive farming.

Villages maintain fung shui woods. When a village is set on a hillside, the trees protect it from wind and landslides.

The fung shui mindset is just as active in the city. Central district is well sited, fung shui-wise, but Hong Kong's original commercial centre in colonial times was set in an inauspicious and inaptly named neighbourhood called Happy Valley. The area was said to have adverse fung shui. Local Chinese avoided it and Hong Kong's centre of gravity shifted to Central.

Central is auspicious because it lies on "a dragon's vein", which runs down to the sea from Victoria Peak. One of the buildings found along the vein is the HSBC headquarters. The bank has also benefited from the fung shui derived from its shape and from the view of the harbour, which symbolises the inflow of money.

Nearby, also located on the vein, is the Bank of China. Despite its setting, and a topping-out ceremony that was held on the auspicious date 8.8.'88 (eight or "bhat" being a lucky number), the building has come under criticism from the fung shui fraternity. The triangular-themed design is deemed unlucky because a triangle resembles a pyramid, and "kam tze tap", Cantonese for pyramid, sounds like "kam tap", the word for the urns used as repositories for the remains of the dead.

Furthermore, say the experts, the building's sharp corners are like daggers: some appear to point inwards, while one has the audacity to point at the Legislative Council building. Most ominous of all are the two "chopsticks" on top of the building; these are said to resemble the incense sticks that are lit in memory of the dead.

Meanwhile, Government House, that most non-Chinese of buildings, is auspiciously located and oriented. Unfortunately, it is now said to lie in the path of the bad fung shui radiating from the Bank of China.

Hexagonal ("pat gua") mirrors are the most common guard against bad fung shui. These mirrors repel malevolent spirits, while drawing in positive forces. If an office overlooks a lake, a river or the sea, a mirror can reflect the water's chi and draw in money.

If do-it-yourself geomancy does not do the trick, and an office or home experiences continuing misfortune, the management might consider bringing in a professional geomancer. His advice will likely include a repositioning of mirrors and fish tanks, a new arrangement of the furniture, a new colour scheme, or even relocation if the situation appears irredeemable. Indeed in rural areas, where belief in the power of fung shui is especially strong, entire villages have been abandoned in the face of ill luck.

Not everyone in Hong Kong has an unshakeable faith in fung shui, but most at least pay it lip service, much as a westerner would rather walk around a ladder than under it.

There's no need to tempt fate, especially when the consequences, according to ancient lore, can be disastrous, not to mention unprofitable.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 3rd, 2006, 11:52 PM   #34
Rachmaninov
Registered User
 
Rachmaninov's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
Posts: 3,188
Likes (Received): 24

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
My favourite residentials are Highcliff & Summit. Their designs are quite unique and difficult to implement. It's hard to believe such narrow buildings can survive on the slopes exposed to the winds, but the architect made it happen.

Fuuk... It's the civil engineers who made it happen!!!!!!!!! There are LOTS of complications behind this structure, I tell you!!!

Highcliff is in my opinion one of the world's greatest engineering feat in the residential sector.
Rachmaninov no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 4th, 2006, 06:28 AM   #35
Manila-X
PINOY MOD
 
Manila-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: MANILA
Posts: 14,388
Likes (Received): 2584

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachmaninov
Fuuk... It's the civil engineers who made it happen!!!!!!!!! There are LOTS of complications behind this structure, I tell you!!!

Highcliff is in my opinion one of the world's greatest engineering feat in the residential sector.
Definitely agree This should be listed
__________________
Manila X-Perience, My collection of images around Metro Manila

Representing The Pinoy Community here in SSC!
Manila-X no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 4th, 2006, 07:35 AM   #36
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,508
Likes (Received): 17834

In line with the sustainable development theme, 1 Peking Road uses solar power to control the curtains in the building. While this is a small step, it shows the growing awareness of environmental designs in modern architecture.

__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 4th, 2006, 08:01 AM   #37
Mosaic
BANGKOK
 
Mosaic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bangkok
Posts: 13,304
Likes (Received): 762

The cliff is extremely tall and slim.
Mosaic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 6th, 2006, 11:15 AM   #38
_00_deathscar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 5,047
Likes (Received): 217

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skybean
Also the quirky multicoloured explosion tower in North Point
Hotel Ibis?

I despise that building...
_00_deathscar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 6th, 2006, 11:28 AM   #39
Manila-X
PINOY MOD
 
Manila-X's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: MANILA
Posts: 14,388
Likes (Received): 2584

How about HK's public housing. Some of the city's housing estates are creative in design like the award winning Lai Tak Tsuen which was built in the 1970s.

Lai Tak Tsuen

__________________
Manila X-Perience, My collection of images around Metro Manila

Representing The Pinoy Community here in SSC!
Manila-X no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 6th, 2006, 11:33 AM   #40
_00_deathscar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 5,047
Likes (Received): 217

Thats the one in Braemar Hill right? They're strange.

What's the big flat curvy building in North Point where you pass on the highway?

Love that one...
_00_deathscar no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu