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Old April 13th, 2007, 03:29 PM   #921
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Picture of La Défense taken last Sunday (April 8) by French forumer J-Ph.
To the the left you can see Granite Tower u/c (2 cranes).
Towards the center you can see T1 Tower u/c (2 cranes also).

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Old April 14th, 2007, 12:43 PM   #922
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News have already reached New York...
Quote:
Building a Paris Hall Around Its Audience

By the New York Times


Detail of the main entrance to the building.


A detail of the concert hall facing the orchestra area.


French architect Jean Nouvel, who was awarded a $266 million contract to design the 2,400-seat concert hall, presents a model of his project.

PARIS, April 13 — Over the last two decades, as successive French governments have poured money into renovating the Louvre and building new museums, an opera house and a national library in Paris, lovers of orchestral music here grew resentful.

Now, just weeks before President Jacques Chirac leaves office, their impatience has been rewarded with the unveiling of an eye-catching design for a $260 million concert hall by the French architect Jean Nouvel. The Philharmonie de Paris, as it will be called, is scheduled to open in the Parc de la Villette, in northeast Paris, in 2012.

The aluminum-clad building — which in a model, drawings and computer-generated images resembles a mound of loosely stacked plates topped by a 170-foot-high sail — will have a 2,400-seat auditorium designed in what experts call a “vineyard” style, with the audience on all sides of the orchestra on multilevel “terraces.”

Once completed, if its acoustics earn praise, the Philharmonie could rank among Europe’s best concert halls, alongside the Berlin Philharmonic’s hall, the Musikverein in Vienna and the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam. The Orchestre de Paris will have its base there, and the hall will receive other leading orchestras as well.

Politics rather than culture, however, were behind the decision to place the new hall in La Villette, an outlying zone. In the early 1980s, reacting against the concentration of cultural institutions in central Paris, France’s government, then led by the Socialists, decided to turn this area, once crowded with slaughterhouses, into a new cultural district within easy reach of low-income suburbs to the east.

As a result, La Villette today offers a science museum, the national conservatory, a rock concert hall, a large exhibition space and the Cité de la Musique, or Music City, with its own 1,200-seat concert hall and music museum. In fact, when the Cité de la Musique opened in 1995, an adjacent space was already reserved for a larger concert hall.

But one problem remained. Even now, the French national and Paris city governments, which are jointly financing the Philharmonie, are aware that many middle-class music lovers are reluctant to trek to the outskirts of Paris. And resistance may have grown since the Salle Pleyel, an 80-year-old concert hall in the heart of the city, was recently renovated.

To give an extra buzz to La Villette, then, it was considered vital for the Philharmonie to stand out as an architectural monument, one not only visible from the city’s busy ring road, but also as commanding in appearance as, say, I. M. Pei’s glass pyramid at the Louvre or the Grande Arche de la Défense, to the west of Paris.

Government officials said that Christian de Portzamparc, the French architect and 1994 Pritzker Prize-winner who designed the much-acclaimed Cité de la Musique, had long assumed that he would be commissioned to build the new hall. But, they said, European Union rules required a fresh competition.

Early this year, from among 98 architectural firms submitting bids, 6 were invited to present detailed proposals. Last week a 24-member jury that included France’s culture minister and the mayor of Paris picked Mr. Nouvel’s design over those of Mr. Portzamparc, Francis Soler, Zaha Hadid, the Vienna-based firm Coop Himmelb(l)au and the Dutch firm MVRDV.

Mr. Nouvel, 61, already has two major Paris buildings to his name: the Institut du Monde Arabe, completed in 1987, and the Musée du Quai Branly, which opened last June. He has also been chosen to build the new Louvre Abu Dhabi, part of a $1.3 billion agreement between France and that city, the capital of the United Arab Emirates.

Although Mr. Nouvel is the best-known French architect working today, he has so far built relatively little in the United States. His first realized project there, the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, opened only last year, while he is now building two residential buildings in Manhattan: one almost completed in SoHo, the other under way in Chelsea.

More relevant to the Philharmonie de Paris is his experience in designing concert halls — one opened in Lucerne, Switzerland, in 2000, and another is under construction in Copenhagen — as well as updating the Opéra de Lyon, which he gutted and rebuilt so that the auditorium now literally hangs from the frame of the building.

Those three projects plunged Mr. Nouvel into the mysterious world of acoustics, one no less central to the Philharmonie, where he will be working with the Australian firm of Marshall Day Acoustics, associated with Yasuhisa Toyota of Nagata Acoustics of Japan.

While the design of the building’s exterior was limited only by a maximum height and the size of the plot, acoustics played a role in defining strict requirements for its auditorium, notably that no member of the audience should be more than 100 feet from the conductor.

This meant that, with a 2,400-seat capacity, the hall could be built only in a “vineyard” style, comparable to the Berlin Philharmonic’s hall, rather than with a rectangular “shoe box” design, like the Musikverein and the Concertgebouw. The vineyard model also allows the public to occupy seats behind the orchestra when those are not needed for a choir.

Mr. Nouvel said that the novelty of his auditorium was to “suspend” balconies — they will be attached to the building by access passages — in a way that allows sound waves to circulate around and behind them. “The idea is that the audience will be in the middle of the music,” he said at the design’s unveiling at the Cité de la Musique on Thursday.

Hovering over the auditorium will be a series of acoustical canopies resembling flat clouds that can be lowered and raised to suit the orchestra and program. Experts said adjustments would be needed, for example, for concerts of jazz and world music, which are also planned for the Philharmonie.

Still, many Parisians may eventually become more familiar with the hall’s striking profile, which resembles Mr. Nouvel’s other designs in only one detail. As with the Musée du Quai Branly, he has raised the building to allow gardens to extend under the hall. He evidently likes botany: the horizontal layers of his new structure, he said, will resemble “leaves about to fly away.”
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Old April 14th, 2007, 06:38 PM   #923
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I find the interior very successful and original.
Very nice!
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Old April 14th, 2007, 06:51 PM   #924
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News have already reached New York...
The renderings are very impressive!
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Old April 16th, 2007, 10:37 PM   #925
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Two little renderings posted on the official website of La Défense. They show the skyline of La Défense in 2012 with the new towers already revealed (Generali, Phare, New Axa, etc.) as well as with the towers not yet revealed (blue shapes).



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Old April 16th, 2007, 10:41 PM   #926
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A video on La Défense website is talking about a new tower called "Carpe Diem", no rendering yet.
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Old April 16th, 2007, 11:32 PM   #927
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'Seize the day' tower?

No offense but that is nearly as bad as the freedom tower
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Old April 17th, 2007, 12:10 AM   #928
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what's the problem with the name ? 1st it's not "seize the day", it's carpe diem, the fact that it means the same is irrelevant. Most building names are dumb anyway, and it gets even worse when you start translating in other languages.
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Old April 17th, 2007, 03:18 PM   #929
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Quote:
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what's the problem with the name ? 1st it's not "seize the day", it's carpe diem, the fact that it means the same is irrelevant. Most building names are dumb anyway, and it gets even worse when you start translating in other languages.
It's true that "Tour de la Porte des Evêques" isn't really a great name either. Same goes for the "Immeuble du Hall plombé"...
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Old April 17th, 2007, 06:12 PM   #930
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Great projects for Paris.

Btw. Jean Nouvel looks like doctor Evil
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Old April 17th, 2007, 07:16 PM   #931
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metropolitan View Post
It's true that "Tour de la Porte des Evêques" isn't really a great name either. Same goes for the "Immeuble du Hall plombé"...
Effectivement
"Tour de la Porte des Evêques" = "Bishopsgate tower"
"Immeuble du Hall plombé" = "Leadenhall building"
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Old April 17th, 2007, 07:57 PM   #932
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Quote:
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Same goes for the "Immeuble du Hall plombé"...
In fact a better translation would be "Immeuble de la Salle de plomb". From what I've found online, it was originally a mansion built above the hill of Cornhill and with a roof made of lead, same as the roof of Notre Dame cathedral also made of lead. In the Middle Ages it was called either "la Ledenehalle" or "la Sale de plom" in legal documents (written in French, the then legal language of England). In one such document dated 1315 they describe a mansion "q'est appellé la sale de plum suz Cornhulle". Now you know everything. Lol.
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Old April 17th, 2007, 08:38 PM   #933
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Originally Posted by SuomiPoika View Post
Great projects for Paris.

Btw. Jean Nouvel looks like doctor Evil

true!



but he is such a great architect
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Old April 17th, 2007, 11:13 PM   #934
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metropolitan View Post
It's true that "Tour de la Porte des Evêques" isn't really a great name either. Same goes for the "Immeuble du Hall plombé"...
well Metro, 122 Leadenhall is the address of he building so that can't really be purstrued as a good or a bad name (stunning building though) and the Bishopsgate Tower isn't called that anymore, it's 'The Pinnacle' (renamed by arabs) Which I don't love, but I suppose when you think it is THE pinnacle of the cluster, it is certainly fitting atleast. (well more so than an ancient Latin phrase lol)

And great laugh on that Dr Evil thing too! (Though like Douly said he is a great architect, love the new concert hall)
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Old April 18th, 2007, 12:46 AM   #935
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Haha what a recemblance!


I just love Paris. Probably europes best city!
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Old April 18th, 2007, 12:54 AM   #936
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Agree. Of the two major European cities I have been to, Rome once and Paris twice, Paris wins. I may not like many of the skyscrapers proposed, but that ain't going to stop me going back when I'm older and having another evening boat trip on the Seine and a go up the Eiffel Tower at night!
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Old April 18th, 2007, 01:52 AM   #937
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Of the two major European cities I have been to, Rome once and Paris twice [...]
You've never been to London? Lol.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 02:37 AM   #938
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You've never been to London? Lol.
London isn't among the two major European city for the simple reason that Great Britain is not in Europe. It's an island. Can't you think as an English dude ?
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Old April 18th, 2007, 03:36 AM   #939
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London and Paris are the two major european cities in Europe
If we do that's Metropolitain said, it is Paris and Madrid the two major european cities
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Old April 18th, 2007, 03:09 PM   #940
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You've never been to London? Lol.
Oh yeah I went to London two weeks ago for the first time. I wasn't counting it as it isn't continental Europe. For some reason I don't really see my country as European. Don't ask me why, I just 'don't'.
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