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Old May 5th, 2008, 11:46 PM   #1701
Cyril
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I'm afraid it is merely tower Pariférique (Daewoo) in the distance..
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Old May 6th, 2008, 12:19 AM   #1702
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
I'm afraid it is merely tower Pariférique (Daewoo) in the distance..
Yes it is this tower.
Tour Pariferique, La Villette or Olympe.
This tower has several name.

Brisavoine is not entierly wrong anyway, a +100 meters high-rises is planned in Aubervillier
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Old May 6th, 2008, 01:34 AM   #1703
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When will a northern or eastern municipality plan a 200m+ tower? They always whine and complain that businesses are skewed towards Western Paris (La Défense), they always jump on their chairs like goats (to quote de Gaule) crying out "le rééquilibrage", "le rééquilibrage" (rebalancing businesses between Western and Eastern paris), but where are their bold projects?? Instead of whining and accusing La Défense of mischief why don't they show us some bold 200m+ towers?
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Old May 11th, 2008, 11:14 PM   #1704
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New renders of Libeskind's tower, one of the five final contestants in the architectural competition for the Signal Tower at La Défense. The developer has revealed that Libeskind's tower is significantly taller than was initially thought. Its height is 310 m (1,017 ft). It will have 53 floors.

Libeskind's tower is the favorite among the five contestants in online polls. Some criticized it for being too short (based on the information we had so far), but it now appears that it is in fact the tallest tower among the five final contestants. The winner will be selected on May 28. La Défense Authority (EPAD) has hinted that more than one of the five final contestants could be built (one would be the official winner, but some others could be built as well).











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Old May 11th, 2008, 11:31 PM   #1705
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Libeskind's tower is a mixed use tower, like all other contestants for the Signal Tower.

- Floor 1 to 2: commercial mall (19,500 m² / 210,000 sq ft)
- Floor 3 to 4: cultural center copied from the Exploratorium in San Francisco (9,500 m² / 102,000 sq ft)
- Floor 5: gym/spa
- Floor 7 to 28: offices (47,000 m² / 506,000 sq ft)
- Floor 30 to 48: rental apartments (30,000 m² / 323,000 sq ft)
- Floor 49 to 52: restaurant, VIP rooms (2,000 m² / 21,500 sq ft)
- Floor 53: viewing gallery over Paris called the "Freedom Platform" (a wink at NYC Freedom Tower?)

In total: 119,000 m² (1.3 million sq ft) of floor space.

Here is a video showing the tower:
mms://stream5.visual.cz/orco/Orco-Libeskind-high.wmv
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Old May 11th, 2008, 11:51 PM   #1706
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brisavoine View Post
Libeskind's tower is the favorite among the five contestants in online polls. Some criticized it for being too short (based on the information we had so far), but it now appears that it is in fact the tallest tower among the five final contestants.
I thought Ferrier's proposal was exactly 310m tall without a spire.
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Old May 11th, 2008, 11:52 PM   #1707
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I feel that Liebeskind will win and that Ferrier's proposal will be built too.
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Old May 11th, 2008, 11:55 PM   #1708
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Libeskind is the best looking from the outside, by far. Ferrier's tower (not sure about the height) is absolutely ugly, and it would hide all the view from central Paris. I hope they don't build it, at least not there. Why not in Montreuil or Bagnolet? Since they want to "rebalance" between Western and Eastern Paris...
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Old May 12th, 2008, 12:00 AM   #1709
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New Neuilly mayor Fromantin lately said that he does not want towers to be built in Neuilly to make up for the cost of the tunneled N13 expressway project. At least those 2 towers will never exist gladly. Still I'm not sure that Hermitage proposal in Courbevoie will be rejected..Epad and Hermitage seem to get on well together..
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Old May 14th, 2008, 07:02 PM   #1710
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An article in the French newspaper Le Monde today about the critical housing situation in Greater Paris. As already explained in message #1694 (read above), 60,000 new dwellings need to be built every year in Greater Paris to accomodate the curent and new population (the population of Greater Paris increases at the record rate of 85,000 every year, unseen since the 1960s), but only 35,000 dwellings are currently being built every year due to selfish stalling from the local municipalities, which creates an extremely tense housing situation.
Quote:
Municipalities in Greater Paris to be urged to build housing.

Le Monde
May 14, 2008



The Greater Paris prefect, Pierre Mutz, submitted four reports to Christine Boutin on May 13, 2008, suggesting some solutions to achieve the target of 60,000 new dwellings built every year within Greater Paris.


Far from the current pace of housing construction, it is 60,000 new dwellings that need to be built every year in Greater Paris to end the housing shortage that negatively affects both people’s lives and the economic competitiveness of Greater Paris.

Four reports submitted on Tuesday 13 May by the Greater Paris prefect Pierre Mutz to the Minister of Housing and Urban Planning Christine Boutin suggest solutions to reach the target of 60,000 new dwellings every year, a target on which everybody agreed. These documents are the result of a six months work by representatives of all the actors in the housing sector in Greater Paris.

“There will be no way out of the profound housing crisis experienced by Greater Paris without a robust boost in construction”, says the report. Yet, a great number of Greater Paris’s municipalities, which have almost all the power regarding housing, are quite conservative on the subject. “One of the reasons why municipalities and their residents refuse a steady pace of new construction is the fear of the burden generated by the arrival of new people, in terms of investment costs (schools and public nurseries) and operating budgets”, write the authors of the report.

Main idea put forward to get round the obstacle: “territorializing the production targets.” In simple English, it means each intercommunality (gathering of municipalities) or territory (made up of several municipalities) will be assigned by contract a target of new dwellings to be built each year, based on criteria that were not detailed. If this target is not met, financial penalties could be imposed.

The authors of the report are calling for the French central State, through its prefects, to wrest local land pre-emption rights and authority over building permit from those municipalities that do not build enough housing. They also propose to financially support the local mayors who build a lot of housing. On this point, Christine Boutin indicated that she believed “more in encouragement than in sanction.” The minister also wants to “develop public-private partnerships” and allow private developers to build social housing.

“Most of the proposals within the report will be integrated in the ‘Mobilization for Housing’ bill”, promised the minister, who hopes to have her bill put on the government agenda in June.

The Socialist president of the Greater Paris regional council, Jean-Paul Huchon, criticized the proposals contained in the report: “They do not fully address, target-wise and scale-wise, the real housing issues at stake in Greater Paris.”

Lucile Ageron and Emmanuelle Chevallereau
http://www.lemonde.fr/societe/articl...ens_id=1026822
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Old May 20th, 2008, 01:07 AM   #1711
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An architect is proposing to heighten the office towers that are located near the Gare de Lyon train station in central Paris. Tower heightening is very popular in Paris at the moment: Axa Tower, Gan Tower, perhaps the towers near Gare de Lyon...

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Old May 20th, 2008, 04:06 PM   #1712
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Wishful thinking don't you think?
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Old May 20th, 2008, 04:11 PM   #1713
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That is merely a vision indeed.
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Old May 20th, 2008, 05:19 PM   #1714
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Not very imaginative is it?
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Old May 20th, 2008, 08:17 PM   #1715
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desiderio_100578 View Post

Wishful thinking don't you think?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
That is merely a vision indeed.
This proposal is just a vision, not a formal proposal, but the idea is there. It's not taboo anymore to think about towers in the very heart of Paris. There seems to be a complete rethink going on in Paris at the moment. What I consider an important article was published online yesterday by Christian Sautter, the deputy mayor of Paris in charge of economic development, finances and the job market. Christian Sautter was previously Finance Minister of France in 1999-2000.

In his article, Sautter compares Paris with Tokyo, and explicitly calls for the construction of towers in the historical heart of the city. This is the first time since the construction of the Montparnasse Tower in the early 1970s that a Paris City official makes a statement in favor of towers inside the cherished and 'sanctuarized' Haussmannian heart of the city. Towers not merely on the outskirts of the city, but right "above or next to old city districts" (in French: "au-dessus ou à côté de quartiers anciens"). Only a few months ago, someone proposing to build towers in the "quartiers anciens" ("old quarters") of Paris would have been stoned to death.

Something is really changing in this very conservative city. People start to realize that you can't live for ever with the legacy of Haussmann, already 150 years old. Paris, like all the big cities in the world, needs to grow and evolve.

I have translated this important article in English (Christian Sautter is number 2 or 3 at Paris City Hall, he's not some maverick on the fringes):
Quote:
Tokyo Paris
A 21st century capital

May 19, 2008

The story started in 1602 when the Tokugawa clan put an end to the anarchy prevalent in Japan. Leaving the emperor idle in his capital Kyoto, they founded a new capital in Edo, now Tokyo. The fort became a castle, nobles settled in the upper city and common people settled in the lower city which spread as the swamps were drained and as the digging of moats and canals, as well as the first refuse generated by the city, provided the necessary material to reclaim land from the sea.

The second phase took place after the Westerners put an end to the isolation of Japan by force in 1854. The deep-water harbor of Yokohama was established in the vicinity of the capital, to which it was linked by the first railway line (1872). Modern industry invaded the flatland of the coastal market gardens and already a conglomerate, ASANO, which would later become one of the most ardent supporters of militarism, invented land management: in exchange for reclaiming land from the sea, the State let the developer use the reclaimed land freely to set up modern factories which contributed to the fulfillment of Emperor Meiji's goal: "A rich nation, a strong army."

Third period: after the defeat of 1945, industrialization picked up even more on these flatlands that were progressively enlarged. Industry on the coast was able to receive coal and metal ores imported by sea at a very low cost, and was therefore able to produce steel at unbeatable prices, something which US and European competitors discovered at their expense in the 1960s.

Fourth period: high growth ended abruptly due to various shocks in the 1970s (fall of the dollar, rise of petrol prices). Pollution generated by the suburban industry had also become unbearable. Plants closed. Yet, what to do with the land thus freed? The owners of these huge brownfields had a brilliant idea. These were the conglomerates Mitsui and Mitsubishi which had weathered quite well the purge imposed briefly by the American occupier after the surrender of Japan.

As Japan, like all the great industrialized countries, shifted towards services such as finance, a happy emulation resulted in the springing up of 'Paris-La Défense' style districts along the bay, from Yokohama to Tokyo and beyond. And then bang! The housing bubble burst in 1991, prices collapsed, projects went down. This ushered in a fifth phase in which we still find ourselves today, a phase dominated by consumption rather than production. Let me explain.

Young Japanese households with double income and no kids (the so-called DINKs) prefer to rent in the center of the city rather than buy a mini-house an hour and a half from their work places by public transportation. The lower part of the city is fortunate to be only a few subway stations from Ginza. The big residential towers (130 to 180 meters) which have sprung up there a bit haphazardly at first are very popular, all the more so because developers have been intelligent enough not to destroy the traditional villages at their feet whose quaint charm and convivial atmosphere are a delight for the Japanese yuppies.

These young employed couples also have new requirements in terms of leisure activities. The fantastic business districts on reclaimed lands are transforming themselves into spaces where one can go shopping (by car!) and entertain oneself. It is even possible to picnic by the waterside in an entirely recreated natural landscape.

Offices have also headed back to the city center, even the hypercenter. The Mitsubishi Group, which has been the owner of the business district next to the Imperial Palace for 150 years, is rebuilding on site, putting up taller towers, often high quality, such as those surrounding Tokyo Station.

Us, Parisians, who find it natural to live in a city whose last urban planner was Haussmann, 150 years ago, are surprised by the speed with which a metropolis like Tokyo has evolved, a metropolis which has become immense (31 million inhabitants) and where quality of life, public transports, quality of air, education have become truly remarkable. Everything is done to make life sweet for young active couples who are the new norm. This tonic and beautiful city is however not immune to the problems generated by population aging: lack of children, rise of old dependant people, people with disabilities. Yet solidarity, which still exists in the villages of this world city, helps confront these problems. The new technologies are used for the benefit of the elders (the so-called "silver industries").

This has us thinking about the future of Paris. It is clear that the current Parisian model, a 'sanctuarized' heart of the city and sprawling suburbs of detached houses now extending their footprint more than 50 km (30 miles) from Notre Dame Cathedral, is not viable in the long term: the growing cost of energy, for transportation as well as heating, will render it absurd.

Thus we are going to have to build more housing in the center of the urban area, that is within the area enclosed by the Périphérique orbital freeway [i.e. inside the 20 arrondissements of the City of Paris proper]. The Tokyo experience suggests the construction of residential towers (not social housing, because construction costs have to be recouped by market rents). These towers would rise above or next to old city districts whose convivial atmosphere they would share.

We must also consider building high-rise offices and department stores above the train stations, as London has so successfully managed to do, in particular at St Pancras. Let's build superb residential towers to mark the gateways to central Paris, and let's boldly renovate the business districts without falling into the trap of costly and hypocritical respect for Haussmannian façades!

Mitterrand made the Louvre Pyramid with the help of the architect genius I.M. Pei. Let's allow ourselves to commit some lesser sacrileges so that Paris may move with the times and, why not, move ahead of its time.

Christian Sautter

Last edited by brisavoine; May 20th, 2008 at 08:37 PM.
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Old May 20th, 2008, 09:15 PM   #1716
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Thats retarded, the paris central area is too dense already. What we need is to built high in the departements of Seine Saint denis, Val de marne, and Hauts de seine, by replacing empty areas and houses.

Paris is 20000 Hab/Km2
Seine saint Denis is 6000 with 1,5 mil : It could house 4,5 Milions
Val de Marne is 5000 with 1,3 mil : It could house 4,5 as well
Hauts de Seine is 9000 with 1,5 : It could house 3 milions

add an extra 1milions considering the disproportionate amount of public buildings and offices in paris, you would house easily all the new comers for 100 years and more in these 3 depts.

no need to touch Paris.
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Old May 20th, 2008, 09:54 PM   #1717
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That's wrong for one reason the public transportation.
When the whole Inner Paris is well deserved by the mass transit system (metro, RER), it is not the case of the whole Seine Saint Denis, Val de Marne and Haut de Seine.

We shouldn't forget that Christian Sautter speak of a relatively court period.
I don't think that in 2020 the subway network of Paris would be over 400 km.
If we only add 50 new km in the subway, I would be happy.
So you can forget the Haut de Seine, Seine Saint Denis and Val de Marne with 20,000 inhabitants/km².

I don't agree with you, we can touch inner Paris and we should touch inner Paris.
The 5~10 floors residencial buildings actually U/C in the inner city are inefient.
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Old May 20th, 2008, 10:44 PM   #1718
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I wish Bertrand Delanoë will make towers built soon in inner Paris
I think he should go gradualy because a lot of Parisians are not totally ready for big towers yet (personally I am )
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Old May 21st, 2008, 01:26 AM   #1719
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I like a lot better the idea to heighten or build taller towers in the district of Gare de Lyon than the idea to build towers along the périphérique as proposed by Delanoë. It makes a lot more sense urbanistically speaking.

Anyway, I've heard that Christian Blanc wanted to redevellop the Gare du Nord/Gare de l'Est neighbourhood. It's true that it's probably the railway stations district hosting the fewest business activities, whereas it's directly connected to Northern high speed rails and CDG airport hub.
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Old May 21st, 2008, 03:18 PM   #1720
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Fresh news about the twin towers in Levallois-Perret. We hadn't heard from them for quite some time, so some people thought the project had been quietly cancelled, especially since the Spanish developer Fadesa withdrew from the project. Well no, Mr. Balkany, the mayor of Levallois-Perret, really wants skyscrapers in his municipality, and the twin towers are still on the agenda.

Le Parisien revealed yesterday that a public inquiry is currently going on. A building permit will be requested when the public inquiry ends on June 20. There are three candidates to replace FADESA: one from Saudi Arabia, one from Qatar, and one from Spain. The mayor should announce which one he chooses shortly. They still expect that the towers will be completed and opened in 2011 as initially planned.

The height of these twin towers is 160 meters (525 ft) each, with 42 floors each. They'll contain 85,000 m² (915,000 sq ft) of office space, an international four-star hotel with 400 rooms, a panoramic restaurant, an underground car park with 1,400 spaces.

Here are two maps showing the location of these twin towers (marked "Levallois" on the maps), as well as some renders already seen. I don't know if some changes were made to the design of the towers, now that FADESA is gone.









Mr. Balkany (left), the maverick mayor of Levallois-Perret, presenting the project in 2006 with someone from FADESA (this developer has now withdrawn from the project):


This is the view over La Défense you have when you stand right where the Levallois twin towers will be built (I took the picture ):
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