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Old April 7th, 2006, 05:00 AM   #41
Randwicked
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Originally Posted by samsonyuen
I thinking that project in Vancouver is ingenious. Any other examples like that?

Why are they called ACE in Sydney? Just the development/retail management company?
I have no idea what ACE is. The developers are Westfield. Maybe ACE is an engineering firm or something.
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Old April 7th, 2006, 05:02 AM   #42
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The court also rejected Wal-Mart's argument that the city had failed to study the environmental effect of banning huge one-stop stores, which included a proliferation of smaller outlets, accompanied by increased traffic and pollution, according to the company. The court said those impacts were speculative and could be addressed if such stores were ever proposed
Oh, Walmart...
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Old April 7th, 2006, 07:54 PM   #43
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I've noticed that some of the most ardent protestors of the big box retail concept are "intellectual elites" who glorify the concept of "smart growth". It is often said that "actions speak louder then words".

Having said that perhaps these "intellectual elites" can spend less time talking and more time opening up their wallets to patronize the businesses they purportedly support?
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Old April 8th, 2006, 10:10 AM   #44
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Mexican grocery chain may build big-box store in SLC
27 March 2006

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - The Mexico-based grocery chain Gigante may build a large supermarket on Salt Lake City's west side, possibly to the detriment of dozens of Mexican meat markets and bakeries in the area.

Sue Stahle converted her Food World supermarket in Glendale to Supermercado de las Americas with Mexican brands and a bakery to make Mexican sweetbreads from scratch.

The change helped her survive a nearby Wal-Mart opening in 2004, but now she fears Gigante "really would take my Latino population from this neighborhood to that neighborhood up there and probably hurt everything I just did."

Gigante could anchor a 160,000-square-foot shopping center at North Temple and Redwood Road.

A California-based developer plans what he calls a Latino-themed project, possibly with restaurants, furniture, clothing and professional service shops.

The Legaspi Co. is seeking a loan and sales-tax-subsidy package from Salt Lake City. The development might not happen without the city's help.

Mayor Rocky Anderson's office is urging the City Council to approve the subsidy, which could mean less money in the form of loans for local businesses.

"I don't think it violates what we're doing at all. A development like this paves the way for more local business," said Alison McFarlane, Anderson's economic adviser, who is aiming to meet west-side demands for more retail.

She said the Legaspi project could have space for local tenants.

"Is it going to affect (locally owned business)? In some way it will affect them, but I don't know how," she said.

Mark Theodore, the attorney for a strip mall in the area, believes the proposed development could put shops out of business.

"This is a very large competitor," he says. "It's the equivalent of moving in a Wal-Mart to the area. This could, in essence, leave a number of strip malls vacant in the long run. We just don't think the Hispanic community has been consulted."

Beatrize Arce, 27, of Rose Park said she probably would go to Gigante, especially if it were one-stop shopping.

She usually shops local Mexican markets to get the freshest fruits, vegetables, meat and sweetbread. Then she goes to Wal-Mart and other neighborhood chain stores for the rest of her groceries. "It will be nice to get everything in one place," Arce, speaking in Spanish, told The Salt Lake Tribune.

Laura Hernandez of Rose Park said her decision on where to shop will be based on who has the lowest prices to feed her husband and five children.

Hernandez, who moved from Mexico 12 years ago, likes Mexican markets for the fresh-cut meat and short aisles and checkout lines.

"We need a store with lower prices -- that will get the people's attention," she said.

Jorge Fierro, owner of Rico Mexican Market & Catering, hopes Gigante will improve the locally owned Latino markets he says are poorly run.

Gigante "will bring a much higher way of doing business in the Hispanic community. It will help to clean up those (whose owners) don't pay that much attention to their business. I honestly think that, sometimes, Hispanics don't ... have a market that reflects who we are in the real world," he said.

Jesus Mejia, who owns a 3-month-old Mexican bakery and restaurant, Taqueria y Panaderia Guadalajara, said Gigante is needed in Salt Lake City.

"It won't affect me at all," Mejia said. "The clientele looks for what they want, and if they like your food, they'll continue coming to you."

But Santiago Flores, who owns two Mexican bakeries on the west side, said if Gigante builds there, "the small Latino businesses will suffer. But what can I do about those big stores? They have money. ... I can just keep working and uphold my business."

------

Information from: The Salt Lake Tribune, http://www.sltrib.com
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Old May 23rd, 2007, 10:48 AM   #45
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Fairfax to Set Limits On Big-Box Stores
Larger Retailers Would Need Approval

By Amy Gardner
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, May 22, 2007; Page B01

The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors decided yesterday to restrict where and how large retail stores -- so-called big boxes such as Target and Wal-Mart -- may develop in the county.

After listening to heated testimony, supervisors voted 5 to 3, with two abstentions, to require that retail developers seek permission before they build stores of 80,000 square feet or more. The goal, according to the measure's supporters, is to lessen the negative effects of big boxes, including noise, traffic and aesthetic blight.

"The bigger these big boxes are, the more impacts there will be on residential neighborhoods," said Supervisor Linda Q. Smyth (D-Providence). "And we don't have the means to review them. We need these added protections."

That sentiment was so strong among supervisors that they rejected a request by business leaders to raise the threshold for the new restrictions to 100,000 square feet -- slightly smaller than the typical Target. Supervisors did, however, agree to revisit the size in 18 months to see whether predictions of a chilling effect on retail development come true.

Board Chairman Gerald E. Connolly (D) proposed the 18-month checkup in part to demonstrate that stopping big boxes is not his goal. He and other board members said they want to allow more public input and do more to guide big boxes to appropriate locations.

"A big box could be just the ticket, or it might be precisely what we don't want in a revitalization corridor," Connolly said.

A variety of community voices entered the debate during a public hearing that preceded the board's vote. Environmentalists and smart-growth advocates asked that the restrictions be strengthened to encourage bike facilities and environmentally friendly construction. A union representative for grocery workers urged passage of the bill specifically to keep more Wal-Marts out of the county, arguing that the retail giant has a history of putting grocers out of business. Business leaders testified that they were worried that the restrictions would be burdensome and scare off developers.

"This zoning amendment sends a significant anti-competitive and anti-business message," said Bill Lecos, president of the Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce. "We can't help but wonder: What problem is it that we're trying to solve? And why is this solution worth the price of our reputation as the premier business location in Northern Virginia?"

A few on the board agreed. Supervisor Elaine N. McConnell (R-Springfield), whose district includes a 140,000-square-foot Wegmans, objected to the idea of making it more difficult for discount stores to come to the county.

"What bothers me most is that it's going to affect the lower-income families most of all," she said.

Under the ordinance, supervisors could reject a store deemed too large for its neighborhood or the surrounding road network. They would be able to demand, in exchange for approval, less sprawling designs, multistory buildings, parking garages and pedestrian and transit access.

A shopping plaza within a residential development, for example, might be a good place for a neighborhood Safeway, Giant or Harris Teeter -- typically 50,000 to 70,000 square feet -- but a bad location for the largest Wal-Mart or Target, which can eat up as much as 250,000 square feet and attract shoppers (and traffic) from miles around.

Very few large commercial tracts remain undeveloped in Fairfax. But officials say big-box development is still possible, particularly in such aging commercial corridors as Springfield, Baileys Crossroads and Annandale.

The Fairfax proposal is similar to policies in communities across the region and nation, including Prince William and Montgomery counties. In Montgomery, as in Fairfax, the campaign to restrict stores larger than 100,000 square feet was driven in part by a union representing grocery workers.
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Old May 24th, 2007, 06:09 AM   #46
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Home Depot, Wal-Mart roll out smaller stores

ATLANTA, May 2 (Reuters) - The biggest of the big-box retailers are looking to get a lot smaller as they try to bring in more customers in areas where mega-buildings are neither practical nor affordable.

Discounter Wal-Mart Stores Inc. , the world's largest retailer, and home improvement industry leader Home Depot Inc. are rolling out stores that are much smaller as their bigger warehouse stores near a saturation point in the United States.

This year, Wal-Mart said it was changing the layout of its Neighborhood Market stores, which are typically about 39,000 square feet, to add more frozen food and bakery items and make over the health and beauty departments.

"We are tailoring specific Neighborhood Markets to provide the type of product mix that will be customized," Wal-Mart spokesman Dave Tovar said.

Wal-Mart, which opened its first Neighborhood Market in 1998, now has about 112 of these smaller stores and plans to open 15 to 20 of them over the next year. Wal-Mart supercenters average 187,000 square feet.

"The need to continue to grow the company and open up stores in places where they're not is what's driving this," said George Whalin, president of Retail Management Consultants.

Last month, Home Depot opened stores that measure 28,600 to 50,000 square feet, smaller than its average 105,000-square- foot format, in California, spokesman Anthony Wilbert said.

The home improvement chain will also roll out small-market stores in Tennessee in July, and plans to open a 235,000- square-foot super store in New Jersey next year.

Whalin said smaller stores make sense for Home Depot but pose challenges for Wal-Mart.

Wal-Mart "is so used to having a bigger palate to paint on and a bigger space to do things in that I think (a smaller format) is difficult," Whalin said.

He said stores in the 40,000-square-foot range require retailers to slim down their offerings. "I don't know that (Wal-Mart) is convinced they can do it right," Whalin said.

But he added that Bentonville, Arkansas-based Wal-Mart might put more emphasis on smaller stores now that Britain's Tesco Plc plans to launch U.S. grocery stores.

Tesco, Britain's biggest retailer, will open small grocery stores in the United States this year to focus on ready-to-eat meals and fresh and environmentally friendly products.

At Home Depot, Whalin said smaller stores can work in urban areas, particularly if they are served by independent hardware stores that can't offer the Atlanta chain's pricing and selection.

"There's a part of America that needs the kind of a hardware store and home center that Home Depot operates," Whalin said.

The New York Post on Monday reported that analysts say Wal-Mart is mulling stores as small as 20,000 square feet. When asked whether Wal-Mart was planning even smaller versions, Tovar said the chain was currently focused on its 40,000-square-foot format.

Whalin said he would be "real surprised" if Wal-Mart set up a 20,000 square-foot store.

Home Depot shares were up 38 cents to $38.81 in noon trading on the New York Stock Exchange on Wednesday, while Wal-Mart gained 33 cents to $48.66.
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Old May 24th, 2007, 08:31 AM   #47
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Big Box Stores are EVERYWHERE in southern california, theyīre like a plague, but like, honestly, I couldnīt imagine it any other way, at least not like in teh way that the cities are designed
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Old May 24th, 2007, 09:03 PM   #48
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This is the one nearest to me, less than half a mile away. It's great if you want to buy their products, which aren't really suited to a city centre environment anyway.

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Old May 24th, 2007, 11:45 PM   #49
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It's important to remember that there are simply more products available for purchase than ever before. A single Wal-Mart supercenter in the US/Canada carries over 100,000 different items. A small shop - or even a series of small shops - simply can't manage that sort of variety on the shelf.

I rented a car in Buenos Aires once, and met up with some of my friends in the center of the city. They did not own cars (well, not in BA - most were from other cities in Argentina). I asked them where we should go. 'Wal-Mart!' they told me. They wanted to use the car to go down to Wal-Mart, have a shopping spree, and carry everything back in the car. Before then, I didn't even realize that Buenos Aires HAD Wal-Marts.

I asked them if they felt comfortable shopping at Wal-Mart, even they were very critical of the US/IMF's role in Argentina's economy. They more or less told me that since the managers were local, and since the stores created local jobs, and since the prices were good, it was not a problem at all.

We went to the Wal-Mart on Av. Constituyentes near the Gen. Paz freeway.

Here is an aerial view of the location:

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Old May 25th, 2007, 12:52 AM   #50
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That Home Depot in Manhattan looks interesting. Where do they keep all of their "outdoors" products like mulch, lumber, etc?

And, has Wal-Mart tried to invade Manhattan yet? From what I've heard, Chicago's Wal-Mart was tastefully done.
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Old August 14th, 2007, 07:23 PM   #51
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"Big box" stores in Africa sign of good news on the economy
4 June 2007

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) - On thousands of street corners across Africa, tiny wooden kiosks peddle everything from mobile phone cards to glass bottles of Coca-Cola.

But the continent in recent years has been seeing an increase in what has long been a staple in the West: The supermarket "mega-store," selling food, electronics, beauty products, furniture and even, in some cases, cars. It's part of an often overlooked economic boom of sorts across the world's poorest continent.

The Kenyan supermarket Nakumatt, which has 18 stores in Kenya, is set to become East Africa's most wide-reaching mega-retailer with plans to open its first branches outside the country starting in November. Like U.S. stores Wal-Mart and Target, many Nakumatt shops are brightly lit and stuffed with television sets, refrigerators and other big-ticket items, alongside staples such as vegetables, milk and bread.

The stores in Tanzania, Uganda and Rwanda would make Nakumatt ready to match the ambitions of South Africa-based giants such as Metcash and Shoprite, according to analysts at London-based Planet Retail. Until now, those companies have been the only retailers in the region with the financial power for expansion plans of this scale.

The African Development Bank reported in May that the rate of economic growth on the continent will rise to 6 percent this year, the highest level in two decades. Some countries have reported especially striking results -- 8.5 percent last year, for instance, in Malawi.

In Kenya, Nakumatt has grown thanks to the relative financial stability in the largest economy in East Africa, which last year grew 6.1 percent, the highest rate since 1981.

The retailer also is gearing up to be listed on the Nairobi Stock Exchange by 2009.

Planet Retail said Nakumatt will find a large customer base outside Kenya, particularly in Tanzania's urban centers of Dar es Salaam and Arusha.

"In both cities, South African retailer Shoprite has already opened stores, but market sizes and economic stability suggest there is room for more," the analysts said in a recent report.

South Africa's Shoprite Group of Companies is Africa's largest food retailer, operates 886 outlets in 17 countries across Africa, the Indian Ocean islands and southern Asia.

Another Kenyan supermarket chain, Uchumi -- which means "economy" in Swahili -- has a branch in Uganda, but the company has suffered vast financial woes. Uchumi shut down in June 2006 after 30 years of business, saying it could no longer sustain its losses and blaming mismanagement, political interference and competition. Local media described the closures as "one of the greatest corporate disasters in the history of independent Kenya."

A government-led rescue plan saw the reopening of all but three of Uchumi's 17 outlets in Nairobi since the June 2006 closure. The Ugandan outlet, operating under a local franchise, has continued to operate.

So-called "big-box stores" in the United States, such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Costco, have long been the target of critics who say their discounted goods drive out "mom-and-pop" shops and sap communities of their local flavor.

But Nakumatt, which has been in business for more than 20 years but only recently expanded to "mega-stores," has been quick to claim that it is not out to hurt small businesses or local farmers. Earlier this month, Nakumatt, which in the past has stocked mainly foreign goods, pledged to support local industry.

"We stock local products, we deal with local investors, local banks," said Nakumatt's operations manager, Thiagarajan Ramamurthy.

And the kiosk owners say they don't necessarily see much of a threat.

David Mwauria, who has been selling flowers on the roadside just steps away from the newest Nakumatt in Nairobi -- a 110,000 square foot, hulking stone building -- says he has seen even more customers since the store opened weeks ago.

"Some customers come here to buy, some go there," he said. "There is enough business to go around."
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Old August 14th, 2007, 07:25 PM   #52
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San Diego council approves ban on big-box superstores
5 June 2007

SAN DIEGO (AP) - The City Council passed a measure banning construction of some new "big-box" superstores within city limits.

The ban, passed 5-3, applies to all retail developments exceeding 90,000 square feet that use 10 percent of space to sell groceries and other merchandise exempt from sales tax.

The council initially passed a version of the ordinance on first reading last November.

Mayor Jerry Sanders has pledged to veto the ban. He has 10 days to do so once he receives the ordinance from the City Attorney's office.

The council can then override the mayoral veto, if at least five members vote to do so.

If the law is enacted, Wal-Mart and other retailers affected by the measure could take the issue to voters through a ballot petition.

The ban on jumbo commerce centers excludes membership stores, such as Costco, that sell items in bulk.

The new ordinance was modeled on a law in Turlock, southeast of San Francisco, which has prohibited big-box stores over 100,000 square feet that devote at least 5 percent of their space to groceries.
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Old August 16th, 2007, 02:42 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Home Depot, Wal-Mart roll out smaller stores

ATLANTA, May 2 (Reuters) - The biggest of the big-box retailers are looking to get a lot smaller as they try to bring in more customers in areas where mega-buildings are neither practical nor affordable.

Small-Box Retail? Big-Box Retail Lite ? Little-Big-Box Retail?
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Old January 27th, 2008, 07:25 PM   #54
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The new ordinance was modeled on a law in Turlock, southeast of San Francisco, which has prohibited big-box stores over 100,000 square feet that devote at least 5 percent of their space to groceries.
100,000sqft... thats insane.
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Old January 27th, 2008, 07:53 PM   #55
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there is a new trend in Toronto and Vancouver of big box retailers opening downtown.

There is a future shop and best buy about 500 feet from each other.

Home depot is moving but of course they don;t have much of a parking lots and survive all on pedestrians just walking in and having a look.
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Old January 28th, 2008, 05:21 AM   #56
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Big Box & Texas?
More sprawling than anywhere I've seen.


Anyways, Where do New Yorkers go to shop for food?
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Old January 28th, 2008, 11:37 AM   #57
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Big Box & Texas?
More sprawling than anywhere I've seen.


Anyways, Where do New Yorkers go to shop for food?
The overpriced Whole Foods and the more affordable Trader Joe's. There are a lot of smaller supermarkets dotted across Manhattan, albeit still chains, and then the mom-and-pop convenience stores around the street corner.
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Old February 3rd, 2008, 04:31 PM   #58
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Around 400 big box (10 000 square meters) stores in Poland, mainly Tesco, Carrefour, Real, Auchan, E.Leclerc. Plus many big box stores with construction stuff, like Castorama, Liroy-Merlin, Praktiker.
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Old February 22nd, 2008, 07:08 PM   #59
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I'd love to see more pictures of Big Box retailers that have opened in urban areas is anyone has them.
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Old February 22nd, 2008, 07:32 PM   #60
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With Big Box retail comes Big Ass parking lots.......
That becomes fun in the 90 degree Texas summer heat. I hate that they cut so many trees during parking lot construction because when I want to find a shady spot there are only about 6 out of about 300 spots.
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