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Old April 5th, 2006, 07:29 AM   #1
ladolcevita
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Greatest architectures of the past 1,000 years

Top Ten Greatest Architecture of the Past 1,000 Years according to this source.

http://architecture.about.com/cs/gre...p/greatest.htm

1) 1137 : St. Denis Church in Saint-Denis
During the middle ages, builders were discovering that stone could carry far greater weight than ever imagined. Cathedrals could soar to dazzling heights, yet create the illusion of lace-like delicacy. The Church of St. Denis, commissioned by Abbot Suger of St. Denis, was one of the first large buildings to use this new vertical style known as Gothic. The church became a model for most of the late 12th century French cathedrals, including Chartres.




2) 1205 - 1260 : Chartres Cathedral Reconstruction
In 1194, the original Romanesque Chartres Cathedral in Chartes, France was destroyed by fire. Reconstructed in the years 1205 to 1260, the new Chartres Cathdral was built in the new Gothic style. Innovations in the cathedral's construction set the standard for thirteenth century architecture.




3) 1406 - 1420 : The Forbidden City , Beijing
Occupying a rectangular area of more than 720,000 square meters, the Forbidden City was the imperial home of 24 emperors of the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties. The Forbidden City is one of the largest and best-preserved palace complexes in the world. There are over a million rare and valuable objects in the Museum.




4) 1546 and Later : The Louvre, Paris
In the late 1500s, Pierre Lescot designed a new wing for the Louvre... and popularized ideas of pure classical architecture in France. Lescot's design laid the foundation for the development of the Louvre over the next 300 years. In 1985, architect Ieoh Ming Pei stirred great controversy when he designed the stark glass pyramid entrance to the palace-turned-museum.




5) 1549 and Later: Palladio's Basilica, Italy
During the late 1500s, Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio brought new appreciation for the classical ideas of ancient Rome when he transformed the town hall in Vicenza, Italy into the Basilica (Palace of Justice). Palladio gave the remodeled building two styles of classical columns: Doric on the lower portion and Ionic on the upper portion. Palladio's later designs continued to reflect the humanist values of the Renaissance period.




6) 1630 to 1648 : Taj Mahal, India
According to legend, the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan wanted to build the most beautiful mausoleum on earth to express his love for his favorite wife. Or, perhaps he was simply asserting his political power. The Taj Mahal may have been designed by Ustad Ahmad Lahori, an Indian architect of Persian descent. Persian, Central Asian, and Islamic elements combine in the great white marble tomb. The Taj Mahal is just one of many architectural wonders in a land of majestic tombs and erotic temples.




7) 1768 to 1782 : Monticello, Virginia, USA
When the American statesman, Thomas Jefferson, designed his Virginia home, he combined the European traditions of Palladio with American domesticity. Jefferson's plan for Monticello resembles Palladio's Villa Rotunda ... With a few innovations. Jefferson gave Monticello long horizontal wings, underground service rooms, and "modern" conveniences.




8) 1889 : The Eiffel Tower, Paris
The Industrial Revolution in Europe brought about a new trend: the use of metallurgy in construction. Because of this, the engineer's role became increasingly important, in some cases melding with or rivaling that of the architect. The Eiffel Tower is the tallest building in Paris, and reigned for 40 years as the tallest in the world.




9) 1890 : The Wainwright Building, St. Louis, Missouri
Louis Sullivan and Dankmar Adler redefined American architecture with the Wainwright Building in St. Louis, Missouri. Their design emphsized the underlying structure. Except for the large, deep windows, the first two stories are unornamented. Uninterrupted piers extend through the next seven stories. Intertwined ornaments and small round windows form the upper story. "Form follows function," Sullivan told the world.




10) Great Buildings of the 20th Century
During the twentieth century, exciting new innovations in the world of architecture brought soaring skyscrapers and fresh new approaches to home design. Keep on reading for Top Picks of the modern age.
Great buildings of the 20th century, including:
1) 1905 to 1910 : Casa Mila Barcelona
2) 1913 : Grand Central, New York
3) 1930 : The Chrysler Building, New York
4) 1931 : Empire State Building, New York
5) 1935 : Fallingwater, Pennsylvania, USA
6) 1936 - 1939 : Johnson Wax Building, Wisconsin, USA
7) 1946 - 1950 : Farnsworth House, Illinois
8) 1957 - 1973 : Sydney Opera House, Australia
9) 1958 : The Seagram Building, New York
10) 1970 - 1977 : World Trade Center, New York (Demolished by terrorist attacks)


What do you think? Any buildings missing from the list? What is your top ten greatest of the last 1,000 years.

EDIT. Removed some poor-quality images and replaced it with new ones.

Last edited by ladolcevita; April 13th, 2006 at 02:34 AM.
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Old April 5th, 2006, 07:38 AM   #2
ladolcevita
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Interesting they picked Chartre cathedral and Saint Denis Basilica over Notre Dame de Paris among all the Gothic architectures. Perhaps they are more innovative in terms of design?
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Old April 5th, 2006, 07:38 AM   #3
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Pft, what a joke of a list.
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Old April 6th, 2006, 02:03 AM   #4
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The list is from the architecture section of About.com, so I think its pretty well researched.

But, where is Neuschwanstein, Angkor Wat, Alhambra, Kremlin.... What about many other medieval and Renaissance masterpieces? And what about Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel in the Apostolic Palace, and St. peters basilica? No Renaissance architectures are presented? Instead, they picked Andrea Palladio's Palladian architectures, which is fine, but still...
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Old April 6th, 2006, 05:24 AM   #5
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Where is Bauhaus?
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Old April 6th, 2006, 07:25 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladolcevita
Interesting they picked Chartre cathedral and Saint Denis Basilica over Notre Dame de Paris among all the Gothic architectures. Perhaps they are more innovative in terms of design?
i personally found Notre damn in Paris to be quite bland and uninspiring. What it does have going for it is the history. The cathedrals in Strasbourg, Metz, Reims, and other cities in france blow Paris' Notre Dame away.
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Old April 6th, 2006, 11:01 AM   #7
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Some strange choices in there - agree with about 6/7 of them I guess.
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Old April 7th, 2006, 10:47 AM   #8
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8 from 10
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job home
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Old April 7th, 2006, 10:53 AM   #9
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I don't agree with the seventh one, there could be thousands more structures that are greater than that small mansion...
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Old April 8th, 2006, 02:23 AM   #10
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can you say just another eurocentric piece of crap
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Old April 8th, 2006, 04:16 AM   #11
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Or can you agree that in the past 1000 years, Europe had the bulk of some of the greatest landmarks ever built?

Which I believe to be true - yes there could be some more from China, India and America included in that but...
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Old April 8th, 2006, 07:18 AM   #12
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What a great thread.

Here is my contribution.

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Old April 8th, 2006, 07:23 AM   #13
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Ive never found out why Monticello is so highly regarded.
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Old April 8th, 2006, 10:42 AM   #14
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I never even knew about it till I saw this thread.

Alright it's a nice house ... but top 10 for architectures of the past 1,000 years?

I'm fairly sure the 17th century saw at least 100 pieces of architecture better than that.
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Old April 8th, 2006, 02:46 PM   #15
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For example:

HAWA MAHAL - The Palace at Jaipur
Built in 1799

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Old April 12th, 2006, 10:39 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OtAkAw
I don't agree with the seventh one, there could be thousands more structures that are greater than that small mansion...
Quote:
Originally Posted by wantuhoa
can you say just another eurocentric piece of crap
Read:

Quote:
When the American statesman, Thomas Jefferson, designed his Virginia home
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Old April 13th, 2006, 05:10 AM   #17
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And strangely enough, it doesn't deserve to be there.

Most of the greatest architectural sights/buildings in the past 1,000 years (at least in the past 500) have come from Europe - thanks in a large part to the renaissance.
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Old April 13th, 2006, 11:36 PM   #18
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The list does feel like it was compiled by a francophile American.

A few not mentioned so far.....







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Old April 13th, 2006, 11:43 PM   #19
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I'm staggered that the Duomo in Florence wasn't in that list. Bruneleschi's dome brought with it new revolutionary construction methods.

How about Salisbury Cathedral? Or the Crystal Palace?

The great buildings of the 20th century looks rather suspect as well. 8/10 of the buildings in America seems a bit overgenerous.
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Old April 13th, 2006, 11:54 PM   #20
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Salisbury certainly looks nicer than Lincoln for me but the latter was supposidly the first building to beat the Great Pyramid in height(when it still had its spires).
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