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Old April 8th, 2006, 07:03 AM   #1
urbane
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Fotos do Maringá, Paraná (atenção: muitas fotos)

Olá!

Estes são a minha fotos de Janeiro 2006 do Maringá, no Estado do Paraná. Desculpe, mas os comentarios são em Inglês porque meu Português é uma catástrofe. As fotos estão no Cityscape & Skyline pictures forum também.

A map of the location from the net:



A map of the city:



Let’s start with the Catedral Metropolitana (shaped, I was told, to resemble the Sputnik spaceship )









The inside:









Walking up, inside the cone we find some bare and unfinished interiors:



Imprints of shoes on the ground:





But the view from the top is magnificent !

Looking south away from downtown:



Looking at the two large city parks that are to the east and west of the cathedral:





Looking to the eastern end of downtown, where the bulk of the retail is located:





The road leading to the Stadium:



The western end of downtown, with Maringá’s tallest building on the left:



Looking towards the terminal for city-buses and the suburbs:



City hall:



Zooming on the sprawl:



Let’s get out, I don’t remember to whom this statue is dedicated, I think it’s the Virgin Mary but there was more of a story behind it:



Virtually all of Maringá’s streets are lined with trees, this is how the city was planned. Here are some examples:







On another planning note, Maringá’s traffic lights are rather interesting: the red light starts with a red ball on top which then drops down every so many seconds. When it hits the bottom it changes to green, which changes the light to a green ball on top which goes down and so the cycle continues:



A street-performer during a red-light:



Avenida Brasil is the main shopping avenue for Maringá, despite that it looks rather unremarkable:







Maringá has two malls: Aspen Park and Avenida Center.

Aspen Park:





And just in case you haven’t had enough of the cathedral :



Avenida Center:



Now to the high-rises with some shots from the street. Something that surprised me was that most high-rises were exclusively for residential use. I could hardly find any tall buildings that were for office use.

Maringá’s tallest:



Others miscellaneous:





Under construction:




Now to low-rise architecture:









Old and modern coexisting in Maringá:



Maringá’s railroad line that eventually goes underneath the city, I was surprised that the intersection is not operated automatically:



Skyline view from CESUMAR (Centro Universitário de Maringá):







Looking towards the countryside:





The campus of CESUMAR:









The Parque Ingá: is one of the two large parks in the city and just like the city, it is named after Maria Ingá, an immigrant from the northeast of Brazil featured in a song (I don’t think she ever existed). Hence the city’s nickname: Cidade Cancão.













The park has quite a few animals as well:











These mini-monkeys can be found everywhere in the park:





Telephone booth outside the park:



Sidewalks:

I am not sure if it’s the case everywhere in Brazil, but the pavement of the sidewalks in Maringá is handled by the owner of the property abutting the sidewalk, hence it changes in patterns, materials, and quality every few meters/yards:



Maringá also has a requirement for property owners to plant trees on the sidewalk, here is a small one:



This requirement, however, leads to problems when the tree grows and becomes too big and cracks the sidewalks:





I was also told that there is a new requirement for ecological sidewalk which will enhance natural water drainage through the soil:



A vast expanse of undeveloped land in a relatively central are of town sits idle by the citybus terminal. Are there any plans to develop it ??





The Terminal Rodoviario - where intercity-buses arrive and depart: Brazil doesn’t have much of a passenger railroad network but many bus companies link cities for those who don’t drive. The terminals in Maringá and Londrina are modern and clean:









Now to the residential neighborhoods:







Raised trashcans in a residential neighborhood, I guess they don’t require lots of bending for those depositing or picking up the trash and keep the trash away from animals (unless those can crawl up the pole or are birds):



Most single family houses are built close to the street:





But occasionally there are a few which have huge setbacks: apparently some people first build the building in the back as a house, and then build the main building towards the street. Once that is accomplished they move into the main building and use the other building for storage, for guests etc.:



Living in a cage





Living fenced-in:





Gated communities all located on the same hill south of downtown echoing European flair





This how the first buildings in Maringá looked like: now there are only a few left, and they are often in disrepair. Hopefully they will preserve them, since they are a part of Paraná’s heritage:









Jogger’s highway next to Maringá’s other park, complete with median ! I couldn’t find a single person walking the wrong way, maybe you get fined if you do





Political advertisement: Maringá has a sizable Japanese community which influences local politics.



I had to post this: Pizza with peanut and caramel !! There was also chocolate Pizza on the menu !



Traveling outside of town one finds himself amongst lush soybean fields:





Skyline view from the distance:



Northern Paraná’s hilly countryside:







The city is arriving here too:



Last views with a beautiful sky:







Tchau !
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Old April 8th, 2006, 08:05 AM   #2
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Quote:
A vast expanse of undeveloped land in a relatively central are of town sits idle by the citybus terminal. Are there any plans to develop it ??
olá urbane!!!

essa área central vazia de Maringá só ficou disponível agora porque antes a linha do trem passava bem aí no meio!!! Por isso os prédios da cidade ficaram bem espalhados, com vários nos quatro cantos e nada no meio!! Agora, a linha do trem foi enterrada e o centro ficou inteiramente livre para construção, o que está ocorrendo. Hoje a maioria dos novos edifício construídos em maringá ficam nesse centro (chamado "Novo Centro"), além de novas avenidas sendo construídas aí ( vou tentar bater umas fotos essas semana).

Eu torcis muito pra que eles aproveitassem esse novop centro para uso estritamente comercial, com skyscrapers altoss, seria uma chance muito boa, pois não é qualquer cidade que possui um centro virgem. Mas as torres que estão sendo construídas são em sua maioria residenciais...

até
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Old April 8th, 2006, 09:41 AM   #3
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Caramba, que cidade linda! Se não fosse pela fiação subterrânea, a quantidade imensa de verde e das calçadas e ruas conservadas, diria que ela parece com Bauru, só que muito mais melhorada!

Belas fotos, e os macaquinhos são muito amistosos! Hehehehe!
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Old April 8th, 2006, 04:11 PM   #4
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que thread fantástico, linda cidade!!!!
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Old April 8th, 2006, 04:33 PM   #5
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Gosto muito dessa cidade! VLW Urbane!
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Old April 8th, 2006, 07:54 PM   #6
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hey Urbane, I want to know more about you. Are you living in Brazil or was it just a job trip? Have you been to other brazilian cities, or just Maringá? Other impressions etc?

Most of your commentaries are right on spot. Like the apparently good law that makes people plants trees eventually leading up to cracked sidewalks... or the fact that every person is responsible for its own sidewalk so there is no pattern or same quality...

As for the trash metal baskets on the street, I am not sure why they are that way? Maybe because criminality is so big in Brazil people are afraid someone will rob their trash cans if they can move them???

Also, the high ratio of residentials compared to commercial buildings. I guess that unlike developed countries, Brazil is too much industrial while developed countries are in the services level (they develop, manage, research, etc, and poor countries produce). Industries rarely have their own towers. Most of the time, industries will have their offices in a low rise building next to the production plant.

I also have a theory, that because of violence, many brazilians preffer living in highrise condominium buildings, where there is more secutiry. Well, so they sell their old houses. For whom they sell their old houses, if everybody wants to live in residential highrises? They sell them for companies! So many companies who would have their offices in a commercial highrise in other countries, in Brazil, they have their offices in what were before residential houses!! So you have doctors, dentists, law companies, etc, etc, etc... all with offices in houses!!!!



Hope you will post more pictures of your adventures in Brazil in the near future!!

Last edited by AcesHigh; April 8th, 2006 at 08:00 PM.
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Old April 8th, 2006, 08:03 PM   #7
JoseRodolfo
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o lixo não fica no chão porque a chuva pode levar, e aí entopir bueiros ou cair em pequenos corregos, o que dificulta a vasão das águas e aumenta as enchentes.
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Old April 8th, 2006, 08:05 PM   #8
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Thanks for the pics!! I like that city a lot! It´s part of my childhood memories.
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Old April 8th, 2006, 08:14 PM   #9
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(I answered this on the thread in the international forum...)


hey dude, i enjoyed the pics! it's nice to have some foreign view on our cities..

About the sidewalks, yes, in all the country, the sidewalks are handled by the owner of the property abutting the sidewalk. It's a way our mayors found to reduce costs for them. I hate that. Some people just don't have any notion of beauty, and sometimes builds horrible sidewalks. And the lack of a pattern bothers me.

Some trees are indeed a problem, as they break the sidewalks. I think they should specify some types of trees that aren't big enough to break the sidewalk and are beautiful. Because many of these big trees are also very ugly. They're trying to do that here in my city.

Unfortunately, in most cities, our houses are all fenced and 'caged', because no matter how safe you think your city is, it's always good to protect yourself. That's also why people choose to live in residentials or gated communities.

A question: how is the garbage handled in the US? Where do you guys put them?
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Old April 8th, 2006, 08:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoseRodolfo
o lixo não fica no chão porque a chuva pode levar, e aí entopir bueiros ou cair em pequenos corregos, o que dificulta a vasão das águas e aumenta as enchentes.
cara, ele não tá falando em colocar o lixo no chão, mas sim naqueles tonéis de metal, q os lixeiros pegam pelas alças e jogam o conteudo dentro do caminhão...


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Old April 8th, 2006, 08:36 PM   #11
damiao
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essas latas de lixo americanas seriam um desastre no Brasil, fico imaginando a galer dando altas bicudas nesses latões!!!
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Old April 8th, 2006, 08:40 PM   #12
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o vandalismo deve ser mais combatido no Brasil, esse é o fato.
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Old April 8th, 2006, 10:18 PM   #13
Renan MG
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Cidade incrível, Maringá é uma das que eu mais gosto no Brasil sem dúvida! adoro cidades planejadas []!!!
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Old April 8th, 2006, 11:14 PM   #14
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Maringá parece ser uma cidade muito interessante. Tem um belo skyline com prédios de qualidade e muito verde.
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Old April 9th, 2006, 02:11 AM   #15
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Ah Maringá! que cidade absolutamente linda! quanto verde e organização!
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Old April 10th, 2006, 12:12 AM   #16
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Muito verde e planejada. Outra boa cidade do norte paranaense.
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Old April 12th, 2006, 03:40 AM   #17
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Sorry, I didn't check this thread for a while as I was busy with an exam. Thanks to all of those who have replied

I also forgot to insert a picture of Maringá's airport:

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Old April 12th, 2006, 03:55 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damiao
olá urbane!!!

essa área central vazia de Maringá só ficou disponível agora porque antes a linha do trem passava bem aí no meio!!! Por isso os prédios da cidade ficaram bem espalhados, com vários nos quatro cantos e nada no meio!! Agora, a linha do trem foi enterrada e o centro ficou inteiramente livre para construção, o que está ocorrendo. Hoje a maioria dos novos edifício construídos em maringá ficam nesse centro (chamado "Novo Centro"), além de novas avenidas sendo construídas aí ( vou tentar bater umas fotos essas semana).

Eu torcis muito pra que eles aproveitassem esse novop centro para uso estritamente comercial, com skyscrapers altoss, seria uma chance muito boa, pois não é qualquer cidade que possui um centro virgem. Mas as torres que estão sendo construídas são em sua maioria residenciais...

até
Muito interessante, eu estou esperando seus fotos !

Você tem renderings dos projetos ?
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Old April 12th, 2006, 03:58 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shosho
(I answered this on the thread in the international forum...)


hey dude, i enjoyed the pics! it's nice to have some foreign view on our cities..

About the sidewalks, yes, in all the country, the sidewalks are handled by the owner of the property abutting the sidewalk. It's a way our mayors found to reduce costs for them. I hate that. Some people just don't have any notion of beauty, and sometimes builds horrible sidewalks. And the lack of a pattern bothers me.

Some trees are indeed a problem, as they break the sidewalks. I think they should specify some types of trees that aren't big enough to break the sidewalk and are beautiful. Because many of these big trees are also very ugly. They're trying to do that here in my city.

Unfortunately, in most cities, our houses are all fenced and 'caged', because no matter how safe you think your city is, it's always good to protect yourself. That's also why people choose to live in residentials or gated communities.

A question: how is the garbage handled in the US? Where do you guys put them?
Hey Shosho, I replied to your questions in the other thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=336192
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Old April 12th, 2006, 04:44 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AcesHigh
hey Urbane, I want to know more about you. Are you living in Brazil or was it just a job trip? Have you been to other brazilian cities, or just Maringá? Other impressions etc?

Most of your commentaries are right on spot. Like the apparently good law that makes people plants trees eventually leading up to cracked sidewalks... or the fact that every person is responsible for its own sidewalk so there is no pattern or same quality...

As for the trash metal baskets on the street, I am not sure why they are that way? Maybe because criminality is so big in Brazil people are afraid someone will rob their trash cans if they can move them???

Also, the high ratio of residentials compared to commercial buildings. I guess that unlike developed countries, Brazil is too much industrial while developed countries are in the services level (they develop, manage, research, etc, and poor countries produce). Industries rarely have their own towers. Most of the time, industries will have their offices in a low rise building next to the production plant.

I also have a theory, that because of violence, many brazilians preffer living in highrise condominium buildings, where there is more secutiry. Well, so they sell their old houses. For whom they sell their old houses, if everybody wants to live in residential highrises? They sell them for companies! So many companies who would have their offices in a commercial highrise in other countries, in Brazil, they have their offices in what were before residential houses!! So you have doctors, dentists, law companies, etc, etc, etc... all with offices in houses!!!!

Hope you will post more pictures of your adventures in Brazil in the near future!!
Hey AcesHigh,

I don't live in Brazil nor was I there on a job trip. I was there to visit my girlfriend. Aside from Maringá, I have also visited Londrina, Foz da Iguaçú, Curitba, São Paulo, and the Costa Paulista.

About the sidwalks, as Shosho said, I guess it's a way for the municipality to reduce costs. However, I think that overall it would be cheaper for the government to put a uniform sidewalk on a street than for citizens to put - let's say 10 different sidewalks on that same street. If the government does it, economies of scale can be achieved and hopefully costs can be reduced. Of course that means taxing residents more, but residents would have to pay to install their own sidewalks anyways.

Regarding the trees, as you say the intent is good but the results are not always ideal. I am not expert in botanics but I would think that there are some kind of trees that set deep roots and won't crack the sidewalks easily. Remainig on that topic, the size of the area that is not paved around the base of the trees is sometimes way to small for large trees. Conversely, I have seen large trees being planted with a large base on sidewalks with a small width: this creates the problem that disabled people (let's say persons on a wheelchair) will find it hard to proceed along the sidewalk.

About the trash-cans: having raised trash-cans might not be a bad idea because animals (such as mice) might have a harder time getting to the trash, and sanitary workers won't have to bend to pick up the trash each time. However, it's generally unpleasant to see trash on someone's eye-level, and the fact that the cans are not covered can generate bad odors I suppose.

About the residential high-rises: I have already heard your theory from a Colombian, so it might be a very good point. Although I don't have the impression that crime in Maringá is a big issue. So perhaps it also means that Brazilians value proximity to jobs, shops, restaurants and other entartainment venues more than Americans who are willing to drive to go everywhere in order to have a private yard. In a sense it's similar to Europe, where we prefer to live in the city centers, the only major difference is that since most of our centers are very historic, we can't build residential high-rises in them.

The point about companies moving in houses, is similar to what has happened in U.S. cities: however in the U.S. this is also in part due to a push to preserve old houses (some very ornate) which were located in residential areas before, but as the city expanded found themselves in a central commercial core. This is rarely the case in Europe though.

Regarding offices: surely, manufacturing companies have offices next to the factory floor (I interned with two manufacturing firms and both had offices in low-rises next to the production areas) and I guess that the absence of office high-rises must be due to the absence of a strong office sector (finance, insurance, consulting, accounting etc.). I have the impression the economic base of northern Paraná consists of: agriculture (it's traditional sector), manufacturing, and services (this one largely provided in cities). Since service-oriented companies don't need to locate in highrises but need to be visible from the street to attract clients they locate in one or sometimes two-story buildings. In Maringá there were also numerous buildings with a store on the ground floor and one or two stories of apartments (those apartments must have had a low ceiling because overall the buildings weren't tall at all !! ). Conversely, I think that the office sector clearly occupies some high-rises in Curitiba or São Paulo (example: Avenida Paulista as everyone here knows).

I hope to be able to post pictures of other places I visited soon: although the town I have the most pictures of is Maringá since I spent many days there.
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