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Old June 21st, 2007, 12:40 AM   #61
BoulderGrad
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trainman Dave View Post
If I remember correctly the tunnels for the Silver line through Dulles Airport have already been built during the last remodeling some years ago. Is this true?
They are building an underground tram to replace the "Mobile Lounges" that were used to transfer people from terminal to terminal. Here's the info on the project:
http://www.metwashairports.com/dulle...ment_2/d2_home
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Old June 21st, 2007, 05:59 PM   #62
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Quote:
If I remember correctly the tunnels for the Silver line through Dulles Airport have already been built during the last remodeling some years ago. Is this true?
Quote:
They are building an underground tram to replace the "Mobile Lounges" that were used to transfer people from terminal to terminal. Here's the info on the project:
You are both correct.
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Old June 21st, 2007, 06:09 PM   #63
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Thank you Cirrus

Did they just provide for the section in front of the terminal building or do the tunnels extend further?
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Old June 21st, 2007, 10:59 PM   #64
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I'm not sure how much was actually dug back then. Good question.
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Old June 25th, 2007, 06:29 PM   #65
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What about the ideas of the expansion of the Green line to BWI? Will those be cancelled now that the Dulles expansion is on its way? And if they have decided not to cancel those plans what will it look like. I read about it but i havent seen any plans or possible maps.
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Old June 28th, 2007, 07:05 AM   #66
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So is the purple line pretty much nixed?
Silver out to Dulles is great, but I think green out to BWI would be overkill.
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Old June 28th, 2007, 04:40 PM   #67
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Green line to BWI is unrelated to the Silver line. One is a MD project and the other a VA project. However, a Green line extension to BWI has not been studied even in the most basic sense and is just an idea, as opposed to the other projects being discussed here which are much more "real". Green line to BWI would be *colossal* waste of money though, as MARC already goes there along the exact same right of way, and could be improved to Metro-like service for much less money than extending Metro.

We need to get over this silly concept that Metro is the only solution to any transit problem. Metro is great, but it’s one tool among many and is absolutely NOT always the best one to use.

Purple line is not nixed, just delayed. Ehrlich wanted to kill it, but knew that doing so would be very bad politically, so instead of killing it outright he just delayed it ad nauseam. Most of the necessary studies are done or close to being done, so if O’Malley makes it a priority the thing could still be built in the next few years. It’s really all a question of political will.

Same deal with the Corridor Cities Transitway. Ehrlich wanted it dead so he delayed it. There was a time when the CCT was “ahead” of the Silver Line.
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Old June 29th, 2007, 05:49 AM   #68
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Why would nixing it be a bad move? Why wouldnt he want it? To much money,to much time,or he just didnt like the idea? And i was wondering i saw a map of the purple line and its route but if they are going to have it stop at several metro stations how are they going to work that? How would they do that? Are they going to do a Fort Totten on all of those stations? Wouldnt that cost a lot of money? And if that wasnt what they are going to do then hpw are they going to have the purple and metro lines transfer? Ive been to all of those stations and i have a hard time beliving that they could cram all of that in. Or will the purple line be underground? And the last thing is would the purple line be considered a metro line or something separate?
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Old June 29th, 2007, 07:54 PM   #69
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Nixing it outright would have been politically disastrous for him because it enjoys widespread support.

He didn’t want it because he was strongly anti-transit / pro-road.

Some of the Metro stations will be fully integrated (such as Bethesda, where the Purple line will be in a subway), but most will simply have the LRT station on the surface street adjacent to the Metro entrance. The nice thing about LRT is it does not have to be fully grade separated like Metro does, so there is no need to do an Fort Totten at all those stops.

The Purple Line will be either light rail or bus rapid transit. It will be shown on the Metrorail map, but it will not exactly be the same as Metrorail. How exactly Metro will brand it remains to be seen.
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Old June 30th, 2007, 04:25 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trainman Dave View Post
If I remember correctly the tunnels for the Silver line through Dulles Airport have already been built during the last remodeling some years ago. Is this true?
And do they have square tiles?
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Old July 2nd, 2007, 05:09 PM   #71
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And do they have square tiles?
???????????????????????????????????
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Old July 4th, 2007, 05:06 AM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yardmaster View Post
And do they have square tiles?
Yardmaster, do you have permission to be in this part of the forum?
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Old July 4th, 2007, 08:04 AM   #73
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They should consider (down-the-road) extending the Yellow Line past its current stop at Huntington in a subway down the Jefferson Davis Highway through the Hybla Valley to Fort Belvoir. With tens of thousands of federal workers moving to the area as a result of BRAC, it would be an extension worth making. Better yet, it could be in conjunction with the extension of the Blue Line (at-grade) down alongside the current VRE rail line until it reaches Lorton. Eventually I would like to see both of these Metro lines serving Occoquan-Woodbridge on I-95 at a transfer station.

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Old July 10th, 2007, 11:12 AM   #74
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Seeing red: D.C.'s Metro faces change
Rather than raise fares, rail will lower ambience.

9 July 2007
The Philadelphia Inquirer

WASHINGTON - For years, the subway system in the nation's capital prided itself on providing a civilized ride.

With something approaching hauteur, Metrorail looked askance at systems (yo, Philly!) unadorned with its carpeted rail cars, upholstered seats and tasteful, sparse advertising.

That is about to change.

The Washington transit system's new executive plans to rip out the carpets; turn up the illumination in the subdued, grandly vaulted train stations, and plaster nearly every available surface, including station floors, with come-ons for everything from antacids to zinfandel.

Metro general manager John B. Catoe Jr. said he wants service to keep up with growing ridership without incurring deep deficits, a strategy that he says requires the system to trim some costly features that made Metrorail distinctive.

The changes were spurred by a decision earlier this year to not raise fares.

One new feature approved by Catoe already has proved controversial: replacing white warning lights along the platforms that blink when a train is arriving with red ones, which officials said will improve safety.

"Those red lights look like dragon's eyes or the gates of Hell," said Gretchen Jacobs, who as a Justice Department attorney might have seen the latter. "They are just bizarre."

The Washington system, opened 31 years ago, is the nation's second busiest after New York, with a record 208 million riders for the year ending last month. It was the 11th straight year that the 103-mile system recorded an increase in ridership.

Metrorail was conceived as a welcoming, even plush, mode of transport to lure commuters out of their cars. Planned during the Cold War, the soaring arches of the stations aimed to outshine the Moscow subway. The system is generally considered the nation's toniest, along with BART in San Francisco, which is one year older.

Yet with Washington's environs increasingly choked with some of the nation's worst traffic, transit officials are contemplating making the system more plebeian.

Metro hasn't heard much from riders yet, a spokesman said.

"It's pretty new," said Cathy Asato of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. "These are just kind of ideas that we're floating."

But down on the platforms the ideas are already taking hold.

"With the exception of the lighting changes, these don't appeal to me," said restaurant manager Robert Hall. "I think Metro needs to find ways to generate more revenue and more effectively use their resources. Quick fixes and cosmetic improvements are not important."

Among more than two dozen riders interviewed, however, the changes generally found favor - with the exception of the advertising blitz.

"I'm torn because they can get more money, but I don't want the advertising in my face every day," said Irene Farrow, who works for an environmental organization.

"I think there's enough advertising - unless they use it to reduce fares," said law-school-bound Whitney Strickland, rolling her eyes at her assumption. "We can dream!"

The massive vaults of the stations are atmospherically lit, to be charitable, but planners did this intentionally.

"They are not supposed to be dark, but brightness is not what the designers were hoping for," said Zachary M. Schrag, author of a history of the Washington subway and a professor at George Mason University in Virginia. "Too much lighting creates shadows, and one of the designers said that brightness and visibility are not the same thing."

Still, anyone who has tried to read the newspaper in the station knows the challenge. "All the stations are too dark, and when I try to read it strains my eyes," said Peter Penn, an engineer.

Kara Franz, a senior at George Washington University, said brighter lighting, which is billed as more energy efficient, would make her feel safer.

"Sometimes I feel nervous about taking Metro late at night," she said.

Perhaps the most aesthetically pleasing feature of the system when it opened was the carpeting in the rail cars, which absorbed noise and made it feel like an airline.

Years of wear have soiled the once-orange carpets, abetted by the thousands of riders - often tourists - who break Metro rules by eating and drinking on the trains.

"I oversee an engineering and a housekeeping department, so I understand the challenge of keeping the carpets clean," said Richard Williams, who works at the Department of Veterans Affairs. "It will be a little noisier, but the trains are packed as it is."

Rick Clark, a flight attendant, said the trains "would probably be more sanitary if they switched from carpet to vinyl."

Dave Kubicek, Metro's new chief of railcar design, said he is exploring various vinyl or tiled alternatives to the carpeting, including non-skid materials and flooring that might help deaden noise. Carpeting is vacuumed weekly, shampooed every two months, and replaced every five years.

Historian Schrag said the carpet "sent a message that this was a nice environment and you were supposed to behave properly."

With vinyl, "you're telling riders visually that this is an environment that's getting hosed down every day," he said. "So it's a possibility people may take advantage of that."

Contact staff writer Steve Goldstein
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Old July 10th, 2007, 09:04 PM   #75
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^ wow. talk about about reviving a thread from the dead.

interesting article about carpets, haha. whatever u have to do to save money i guess.

any news on the extension to dulles???
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Old July 10th, 2007, 10:37 PM   #76
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There is thread on the extention to Dulles:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=487377
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Old July 11th, 2007, 12:19 AM   #77
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alright, (i guess im talking mainly to cirrus here) i have a couple questions
1) with a 2013 completion date, when do they anticipate awarding contracts and starting construction?
2) the purple line was apparently put on hold by some erlich dude - is it still on hold? it seems to me lrt has a lot of potential in dc.
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Old July 29th, 2007, 04:56 AM   #78
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The Silver Line may not be built after all, given cost estimates are close to exceeding the limits set by the FTA:

Dulles Metro Funding At Risk;
DOT Says Costs Are Close to Limit Of U.S. Guidelines


By Bill Turque
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, July 28, 2007; Page B01


The estimated cost of the proposed Metrorail extension to Dulles International Airport has grown so significantly over the past three years that it may not meet guidelines for federal funding, the U.S. Transportation Department's inspector general reported yesterday.

The findings represent the first independent look at the mounting price tag for the project's 11.6-mile first phase -- from $1.52 billion in December 2004 to the current estimate of as much as $2.7 billion. Virginia and Dulles Transit Partners, the private construction consortium selected by the state to build the extension, are seeking $900 million from the Federal Transit Administration's New Starts program in addition to a $375 million loan.

But the report, prepared by Rebecca Anne Batts, acting assistant inspector general for surface and maritime programs, describes the project as teetering on the edge of cost-effectiveness guidelines required for federal funding. Qualification for federal money requires an overall rating of "medium low." It is unlikely that the project could be built without federal money.

"Achieving this rating may prove difficult with the current cost increases," Batts wrote. She also cited lack of competition in the award of the contract to Dulles Transit Partners as "one possible cause of the cost growth." The rail contract was awarded under a Virginia law that allowed the state to negotiate with a single bidder. There is no set price that the project would have to meet to achieve the rating, but federal officials had said the project was about at its limit when the cost estimate was $2.4 billion last winter.

The report will almost certainly send the state, Dulles Transit Partners and the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, the agency that would oversee construction, back to the drawing board in an attempt to prune costs.
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Old July 30th, 2007, 04:04 AM   #79
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Whoaa im totaly shocked. How did they mess up the estimate the first time? How do you get something that big messed up so bad? Whoa im in shock!
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Old October 6th, 2007, 02:19 AM   #80
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This project is dying a slow death....
--------------------------------------------------

Timeline woes could kill $900M in federal funding for Dulles rail

WASHINGTON - The troubled Dulles Rail extension won’t receive an essential $900 million in federal funding unless a major schedule and budget dispute is resolved, federal officials warned Thursday. Loss of the federal money, local transportation officials have consistently said, would likely doom the project.

A letter from the Federal Transit Administration to Project Director Sam Carnaggio highlights a critical disagreement on how long the project will take to complete. While the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, which is managing the project, claims it can open the initial 11.6 miles of track by the end of 2012, the transit agency argues that a realistic completion date could be as late as early 2014.

Whether the FTA can approve the funding hinges on a formula that weighs the rail’s expected price tag against how many riders it will serve. By that standard, the rail already ranks as one of the least efficient transit lines under consideration by the FTA. With costs expected to escalate 4.25 percent each year, the schedule dispute could make or break the rail project.

“That’s going to have to be resolved,” FTA spokesman Wes Irvin said. “Our independent engineers have presented a different schedule than what [the airports authority] has agreed to, so that affects the bottom line.”

MWAA and Virginia officials recently trimmed $306 million from the new track’s budget in hopes of meeting FTA’s cost/benefit threshold, though the FTA has yet to approve those 19 cuts.

It’s unlikely the federal government will revise its timeline estimates. MWAA and Virginia officials would then be left with a choice of revising their schedule and driving up cost estimates — which could doom the project — or find another way to cut costs. Any cuts that undermine the number of riders could also hurt the extension’s chances of approval.

“The date [the FTA] believes the project will be complete will win at the end of the day; it trumps theirs,” Irvin said.
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