daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


View Poll Results: So?
EU 388 79.51%
USA 100 20.49%
Voters: 488. You may not vote on this poll

Closed Thread

 
Thread Tools
Old June 10th, 2005, 10:49 PM   #161
LtBk
Registered User
 
LtBk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Greater Baltimore
Posts: 3,103
Likes (Received): 3707

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme
^ the Italians are pretty good at it too
I thought Italians have good lane discipline
LtBk no está en línea  

Sponsored Links
Old June 10th, 2005, 11:21 PM   #162
txRNGr
Registered User
 
txRNGr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dallas / College Station
Posts: 17
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme
^ the Italians are pretty good at it too
haha ohh man i bet they are...i can just imagine ferraris weaving and racing down freeways, now that would be awesome!
txRNGr no está en línea  
Old June 10th, 2005, 11:31 PM   #163
Jonesy55
Mooderator
 
Jonesy55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Floreat Salopia
Posts: 14,205
Likes (Received): 20281

Quote:
Originally Posted by txRNGr
haha ohh man i bet they are...i can just imagine ferraris weaving and racing down freeways, now that would be awesome!
You see a few ferraris but it's mostly small Fiats overtaking on blind bends etc, driving in Italy can be a pain because of the drivers.
Jonesy55 no está en línea  
Old June 11th, 2005, 02:45 AM   #164
aatbloke
Registered Abuser
 
aatbloke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middlesborough, Cleveland, GB
Posts: 200
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by txRNGr
its called offensive driving...its fun, you should try it

You pay a price for that fun - US car insurance rates are absolutely astronomical.
aatbloke no está en línea  
Old June 11th, 2005, 04:57 AM   #165
czm3
Automobile lover
 
czm3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: NYC/Miami
Posts: 381
Likes (Received): 147

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blink182
Boston, after big dig is done but its will longer time to complete as since 1990.
Sorry, but as a Bostonian I ask how the rehabilitation of 8 miles of interstate could make Boston a great place to drive?

Between speed limits, traffic, and construction, no US city is fun to drive in. Then again, what do you guys consider a fun road? In my opinion, it isnt one located in any urban area. Afterall, it is difficult to consistantly and safely push your car to the limit. Country highways, here I come.
czm3 no está en línea  
Old June 11th, 2005, 05:15 AM   #166
EdZed
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Calgary
Posts: 196
Likes (Received): 0

For Scenery
Beartooth Hwy. (MT Hwy 212)

Going To The Sun Road



The one time I went to Houston the stacks there are amazing I forget what highways though. Also I-70 west of Denver is pretty sweet through that one canyon.
EdZed no está en línea  
Old June 11th, 2005, 09:00 AM   #167
txRNGr
Registered User
 
txRNGr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dallas / College Station
Posts: 17
Likes (Received): 0

dude, first of all it was a joke; and second of all, the United State's economic system isnt as socialist as Europe's is, so we pay alittle bit more for alot more quality.
txRNGr no está en línea  
Old June 11th, 2005, 04:58 PM   #168
Jonesy55
Mooderator
 
Jonesy55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Floreat Salopia
Posts: 14,205
Likes (Received): 20281

How is your car insurance 'better quality' than ours?
Jonesy55 no está en línea  
Old June 11th, 2005, 05:21 PM   #169
andrewSQ347
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Venice
Posts: 60
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonesy55
How is your car insurance 'better quality' than ours?
yeah , and better for who most probably it's better for the Insurance companies
andrewSQ347 no está en línea  
Old June 11th, 2005, 06:34 PM   #170
aatbloke
Registered Abuser
 
aatbloke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middlesborough, Cleveland, GB
Posts: 200
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by txRNGr
dude, first of all it was a joke; and second of all, the United State's economic system isnt as socialist as Europe's is, so we pay alittle bit more for alot more quality.

"Dude" - clearly you've never set foot in Europe. You have a very rose-coloured idea, obviously. Here's an example of great quality US insurance - I switched to my wife's health insurance plan and made a trip to the doctor for an update on an existing medical condition. The new insurance company declined to pay on the basis that it wasn't a new medical condition!!

I have an old 86 Ford Bronco truck as a weekend plaything. I love it. It's been everywhere with me: France, the UK, and I shipped it over to the States. Given that in the UK I had to insure it through a specialist insurer because it was not an officially imported vehicle, I still paid less than one-third in the UK for insurance in premiums than I do in the States for it, plus I had less than half the insurance excess (deductable) on any claims while in the UK compared to the US. Furthermore, the US coverage isn't anything like as extensive (no replacement emergency vehicle coverage included unlike the UK).
aatbloke no está en línea  
Old June 12th, 2005, 03:04 AM   #171
EarlyBird
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Likes (Received):

My personal opinion is that the reason the US highways aren't as good is because they are much more crowded. Why? Because US public transport is severely lacking.

 
Old June 13th, 2005, 12:04 AM   #172
txRNGr
Registered User
 
txRNGr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dallas / College Station
Posts: 17
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by aatbloke
"Dude" - clearly you've never set foot in Europe. You have a very rose-coloured idea, obviously. Here's an example of great quality US insurance - I switched to my wife's health insurance plan and made a trip to the doctor for an update on an existing medical condition. The new insurance company declined to pay on the basis that it wasn't a new medical condition!!

I have an old 86 Ford Bronco truck as a weekend plaything. I love it. It's been everywhere with me: France, the UK, and I shipped it over to the States. Given that in the UK I had to insure it through a specialist insurer because it was not an officially imported vehicle, I still paid less than one-third in the UK for insurance in premiums than I do in the States for it, plus I had less than half the insurance excess (deductable) on any claims while in the UK compared to the US. Furthermore, the US coverage isn't anything like as extensive (no replacement emergency vehicle coverage included unlike the UK).
i have no idea what a "rose-coloured idea" is and im not going to get into a never-ending argument about economic systems or your one expirence with an insurance company in the United States. i have my beliefs based on my expierences half-way around the world and you have your own beliefs based on your own expierences. i do not know how we got to arguing about insurance rates on a highway thread. furthermore, i am tired of being bashed for my pride in my country by "European Elitists" who base arguments off opinions i cannot and am tired of trying to understand. i have discovered that this forum is filled with empty arguments that are almost always based off pure opinion seldom having factual evidence. i am done with this endless bitching cycle. have fun living in Europe because i am very happy living in the US...im out forever.
txRNGr no está en línea  
Old June 13th, 2005, 01:16 AM   #173
aatbloke
Registered Abuser
 
aatbloke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middlesborough, Cleveland, GB
Posts: 200
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by txRNGr
i have no idea what a "rose-coloured idea" is and im not going to get into a never-ending argument about economic systems or your one expirence with an insurance company in the United States. i have my beliefs based on my expierences half-way around the world and you have your own beliefs based on your own expierences. i do not know how we got to arguing about insurance rates on a highway thread. furthermore, i am tired of being bashed for my pride in my country by "European Elitists" who base arguments off opinions i cannot and am tired of trying to understand. i have discovered that this forum is filled with empty arguments that are almost always based off pure opinion seldom having factual evidence. i am done with this endless bitching cycle. have fun living in Europe because i am very happy living in the US...im out forever.
Good grief, what insecurity. Those experiences are with several insurance companies - but that's the state of the insurance industry in the US. I use examples to back up my arguments, simple as that. Can you at least cite any examples to back up your argument? Given that you don't know the phrase "rose-coloured" I'm curious as to how old you really are and therefore if your experiences of "living half-way around the world" are indeed true.

Sorry pal, most people can deal with their countries having cons and well as pros, but you cannot....and the only empty arguments come from those like yourself who make claims based on how they think the world works with little clue as to the reality. You yourself haven't stated one iota of factual evidence (quote) yet you cry down those who do. That's why you're "out forever".
aatbloke no está en línea  
Old June 13th, 2005, 01:24 AM   #174
aatbloke
Registered Abuser
 
aatbloke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middlesborough, Cleveland, GB
Posts: 200
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by EarlyBird
My personal opinion is that the reason the US highways aren't as good is because they are much more crowded. Why? Because US public transport is severely lacking.

US highways are nothing like as crowded as they are in the UK and continental Europe, except for the major conurbations. For example, the Pennsylvania turnpike around Pittsburgh handles roughly one-tenth of the traffic that the M6 does around Birmingham.

Unlike the UK, urban bus services in the US are not deregulated. My experience of the service in Pittsburgh is that service performs well, but it just isn't very extensive.
aatbloke no está en línea  
Old June 13th, 2005, 07:47 AM   #175
eomer
Bring Constantinople back
 
eomer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Val de Marne (Paris)
Posts: 13,980
Likes (Received): 4726

US Higways are very different than European ones. In US, most higways are in subburban area and are very crowed. The Insterstate Network is safe and not crowed: it's because US citizen use more often planes than European.
__________________
Cordialement, Kind Regards
Eomer
Look to my coming, at first light, on the fifth day. At dawn, look to the East.
A l'aube du cinquième jour, regardez vers l'est
eomer no está en línea  
Old June 15th, 2005, 05:44 AM   #176
Ionizer
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Mexico City, North America
Posts: 19
Likes (Received): 0

Europe is small compared to the continental US.... American highways are this way since 50 years ago...

So?
Ionizer no está en línea  
Old June 15th, 2005, 04:20 PM   #177
Justme
Gotta lite?
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Manchester (Forecast: Rain)
Posts: 4,952
Likes (Received): 780

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ionizer
Europe is small compared to the continental US.... American highways are this way since 50 years ago...

So?
Actually, Europe is larger then the U.S. including Alaska. Although most of the population is on the western side. Then again, the bulk of the U.S. population is on the Eastern side.

Europe 10,600,00km² link
United States (including Alaska) 9,631,418km² link
__________________
I'm doing my bit to save bandwidth by deleting my signature
Justme no está en línea  
Old June 16th, 2005, 04:51 AM   #178
909
-
 
909's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,418

Only problem with Europe is defining it's borders. Europa is not a continent, but it's like India a sub-continent and with that a part of Eurasia. The borders of Europe are not political or truely physical, but psycholical and in some cases cultural (as refering to your link).
And to be honest, i think that in this case it's better to compare the US with the Europian Union.
__________________
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player. That struts and frets his hour upon the stage. And then is heard no more: it is a tale. Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
909 no está en línea  
Old June 16th, 2005, 05:21 AM   #179
aatbloke
Registered Abuser
 
aatbloke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middlesborough, Cleveland, GB
Posts: 200
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by 909
Only problem with Europe is defining it's borders. Europa is not a continent, but it's like India a sub-continent and with that a part of Eurasia. The borders of Europe are not political or truely physical, but psycholical and in some cases cultural (as refering to your link).
And to be honest, i think that in this case it's better to compare the US with the Europian Union.

What on earth are you talking about? Europe is a continent. Europe and most of Asia sit on the Eurasian tectonic plate. Officially, Europe's eastern border runs the length of the Ural Mountains. India is a country and part of the continent of Asia; it's known as the Indian subcontinent simply because it sits on a small tectonic plate which it shares with Pakistan and Bangladesh.

The European Union is not a country - it's basically a glorified trading bloc (as it used to be when it was the EEC) except that it has a parliament of its own along with a taxation system and of course a common currency used by most of its member states. Whatsmore, the biggest country in Europe -being the European part of Russia - is not in the EU, nor are many other countries.

I think you should seriously look at taking one or two geography lessons. This might help you:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Tectonic_plates.png

Last edited by aatbloke; June 16th, 2005 at 05:33 AM.
aatbloke no está en línea  
Old June 16th, 2005, 02:33 PM   #180
909
-
 
909's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,418

I am not an expert, that's true. But this discussion depends on the used definitions:

Quote:
Originally Posted by aatbloke
What on earth are you talking about? Europe is a continent. Europe and most of Asia sit on the Eurasian tectonic plate. Officially, Europe's eastern border runs the length of the Ural Mountains.
Europe isn't geological a continent:

Quote:
Geologically, the surface of Earth consists of many tectonic plates. Some of them are continental plates, largely covered by thick, relatively light metamorphic and sedimentary rock such as granite which floats on the Earth's mantle, and much of which is visible as dry land; and the rest are oceanic plates, consisting of a thin basaltic layer of solidified mantle, and covered by a sea punctuated with basaltic volcanos. There are six large continental plates, which give the following geologically recognized continents, from the largest to the smallest:

Eurasia mostly on the Eurasian Plate
Africa on the African Plate
North America mostly on the North American Plate
South America on the South American Plate
Antarctica on the Antarctic Plate
Australia on the Australian Plate

(...)

Because of the perceived cultural differences by the inhabitants, it is conventional to subdivide Eurasia into Europe and Asia. They are more appropriately called regions, and neither is a geological or geographical continent. In the same manner, historians may subdivide Africa-Eurasia into Eurasia-North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa.

These definitions give the following alternate models:

7 regions: Europe, Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, and Australia.
6 regions: Europe, Asia, Africa, America, Antarctica, and Australia.
5 continents: Eurasia, Africa, America, Antarctica, and Australia.
4 continents: Africa-Eurasia, America, Antarctica, and Australia.
The 7-region model is usually taught in the United States and Canada, while the geological 6-continent model is taught in East Asia. In Europe and Latin America including the United Kingdom and Mexico, they teach the 6-region model, which is shown in the Olympic Games flag as five rings, excluding Antarctica.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continent
Quote:
Europe

Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. It is conventionally considered a continent, which, in this case, is more of a cultural distinction than a geographic one. It is bounded to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the west by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea, and to the east by the Ural Mountains and the Caspian Sea (for more detailed description see Geography of Europe).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europe
Quote:
Geography of Europe

Geographically, Europe is a part of the larger landmass known as Eurasia. The Ural Mountains in Russia form Europe's eastern boundary with Asia. The southeast boundary with Asia is not universally defined, with either the Ural or Emba rivers serving as possible boundaries, continuing with the Caspian Sea, and either the Kuma and Manych rivers or the Caucasus mountains as possibilities, and onto the Black Sea; the Bosporus, the Sea of Marmara, and the Dardanelles conclude the Asian boundary. The Mediterranean Sea to the south separates Europe from Africa. The western boundary is the Atlantic Ocean, but Iceland, much farther away than the nearest points of Africa and Asia, is also included in Europe. There is ongoing debate on the true location of the geographical centre of Europe.

The idea of a European "continent" is not universally held. Some non-European geographical texts refer to a Eurasian Continent, or to a European "sub-continent", given that "Europe" is not surrounded by sea and is, in any case, much more a cultural than a geographically definable area.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geography_of_Europe
Quote:
Subcontinent

A subcontinent is a large part of a continent. There is no agreement on what constitutes a subcontinent. Generally, however, a subcontinent is split from the rest of a continent by something like a mountain range or by tectonic plates. The phrase the Subcontinent, used on its own in English, commonly means the Indian subcontinent.

Geological/geographical subcontinents

In plate tectonics, a small continental plate connected to a larger continental plate can be called a subcontinent. In this sense, the Indian subcontinent on the India Plate and the Arabian subcontinent on the Arabian Plate are recognized. The latter is not commonly called a subcontinent geographically because of lack of a geographical border and a variety in climate. Europe is just a peninsula since it is on the Eurasian Plate.

In geography, Europe is occasionally described as a subcontinent of Eurasia for its vast area. Likewise, the smallest continent Australia and the largest island Greenland are sometimes called subcontinents.

North America and South America are thought to be the two subcontinents of the continent of the Americas in some cases, because they are connected by an isthmus. Africa and Eurasia are sometimes considered to form the continent of Africa-Eurasia for the same reason. However, the Americas and Africa-Eurasia are usually called supercontinents, composed of continents.

Cultural subcontinents

The term the Indian subcontinent is used also culturally and politically. It includes India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, and usually other South Asian countries too. The region has wide geographical variations like desert, plateau, rainforest, mountains and a myriad of languages, races and religions.

Sometimes subregions of continents are dubbed subcontinents because their culture is so different from the rest of the continent, such as Central America and the Middle East.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subcontinent
And that's what i was talking about in my previous reply: "Only problem with Europe is defining it's borders. Europa is not a continent, but it's like India a sub-continent and with that a part of Eurasia. The borders of Europe are not political or truely physical, but psycholical and in some cases cultural."
And it also depends on which defenition is used for continent.


Quote:
Originally Posted by aatbloke
India is a country and part of the continent of Asia; it's known as the Indian subcontinent simply because it sits on a small tectonic plate which it shares with Pakistan and Bangladesh.
And India is a subcontinent:

Quote:
Indian subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent is the peninsular region of South Asia, which includes India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, usually also Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and some disputed territory currently controlled by China, and sometimes Myanmar. Geographically, the region is bound by the Himalaya to the north and east, and the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal to the south. The Hindu Kush mountains between Pakistan and Afghanistan/Iran are usually considered the westernmost edge of the subcontinent. It is also known as the Indo-Pak subcontinent, primarily in Pakistan. Being the only region in the world that is commonly described as a subcontinent, it is often simply called the Subcontinent. The term South Asia is often used synonymously with the term Subcontinent, although technically South Asia refers more specifically to a political entity (the various countries that make up the Subcontinent), while the Subcontinent signifies a geographical area.

Geologically, this region is a subcontinent because it rests on a tectonic plate of its own, the India Plate, separate from the rest of Eurasia and was once a small continent before colliding with the Eurasian Plate and giving birth to the Himalayan range and the Tibetan plateau. Even now the India Plate continues to move northward with the result that the Himalaya are growing taller by a few centimetres each decade. In addition, the region is also home to an astounding variety of geographical features that are typical of much larger continents, such as glaciers, rainforests, valleys, deserts, and grasslands in an area about half the size of the United States.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_subcontinent


Quote:
Originally Posted by aatbloke
The European Union is not a country - it's basically a glorified trading bloc (as it used to be when it was the EEC) except that it has a parliament of its own along with a taxation system and of course a common currency used by most of its member states. Whatsmore, the biggest country in Europe -being the European part of Russia - is not in the EU, nor are many other countries.

I think you should seriously look at taking one or two geography lessons. This might help you:
I never talked about the EU as a country, that's something you made up. But when we are comparing highways in the US with those in Europe, i think it's better to compare the US with the EU and nog with Europe. That's what i was talking about, but i should have been more clear about that. My mistake.

And talking about geography lessons, it looks like we can follow lessons together...
__________________
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player. That struts and frets his hour upon the stage. And then is heard no more: it is a tale. Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

Last edited by 909; June 16th, 2005 at 02:56 PM.
909 no está en línea  


Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium