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Old April 15th, 2008, 08:42 PM   #221
Timon91
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Last evening the police in Almere caugt 25 guys on scooters who were going to race in such an illegal street race. The police found an anouncement on some forum for this streetrace, and they just arrived on time to stop it.
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Old April 15th, 2008, 11:12 PM   #222
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Oh this is a very common event here in BG lol:
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Old May 29th, 2008, 08:24 AM   #223
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Highway Safety - Keeping Wildlife Away

Wyoming installs more deer underpasses
28 May 2008

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - In a $4 million effort to improve highway safety for both wildlife and motorists, crews are installing six underpasses along a stretch of rural highway running through a mule deer migration route in southwestern Wyoming.

The idea of the project is to get the deer to use the underpasses and avoid collisions with vehicles on the roadway.

"It's just meant to keep the travelers safer on the road because you get people seeing a deer in the road and they swerve into the other lane and have a head-on or swerve off the road and roll their truck or something," Jennifer Hoffman, resident engineer with the Wyoming Department of Transportation, said in a telephone interview Wednesday.

The project, a cooperative effort by WYDOT and the state Game and Fish Department, includes installing 8-foot high fencing for about six miles along both sides of U.S. 30 through Nugget Canyon, which is a major migration route every spring and fall for mule deer.

Between 300 and 500 deer are killed each year along the highway, Hoffman said.

One underpass and tall fencing have already been installed along about 10 miles of the highway. Studies showed some deer used the underpass but others went around the fence.

That prompted the state to undertake the latest project, which involves installing more underpasses and fencing on the east side of the existing underpass and fencing, Hoffman said.

"We're hoping these six new ones will help with that and not push the deer so much to the end of the fence, that they'll actually go underneath the roadway instead of just pushing the problem further down the road," she said.

The project is entirely funded by the state.

Hoffman said the project is expected to be completed by Oct. 31.

In order to minimize traffic delays, two underpasses are being installed at a time and precast sections are being used to speed up the work.

"WYDOT crews use a crane to swing the underpasses into place under the highway," WYDOT technician Dave Neilson said in a statement. "Then wing-shaped fences are installed to funnel the deer into the underpass boxes. The placement of the boxes must be highly visual to the deer. There can't be any bumps at the ends of the underpasses or the deer won't use them."

Bill Rudd, Game and Fish assistant wildlife division chief, said officials have been experimenting since 1986 with ways to reduce deer-vehicle collisions in the canyon.

"We were losing large numbers of deer in the Wyoming Range mule deer herd and it seemed like the underpasses would help save this important mule deer herd," Rudd said.

Rudd said the effort is ongoing and involves many volunteers, students from the University of Wyoming, state agencies and groups such as the Mule Deer Foundation.
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Old May 29th, 2008, 09:59 PM   #224
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In Portugal we have a bridge like that. (1 bridge, just shows how sad it is, so little wildlife left that Portugal only needs 1.)
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Old September 7th, 2008, 08:54 PM   #225
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Hello, post some pics from speedcams at Highways from your countries.

I`ll start:

Switzerland


HQ+GPS: http://www.panoramio.com/photo/4345306


GPS+HQ: http://www.panoramio.com/photo/7518423




GPS+HQ: http://www.panoramio.com/photo/13668916


More speedcams from Switzerland here: Speecdams

What happens when you drive to fast here on highways:

Allowed 120kmh:

When u drive:
130kmh: Fr. 40.- =35,90 US-Dollar
140kmh: Fr. 250.-224,40 US-Dollar
150kmh: You give away your driving license away for at least 1 month!
160kmh: You give away your driving license away for severals months!
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Last edited by nils16; September 7th, 2008 at 09:04 PM.
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Old September 7th, 2008, 10:48 PM   #226
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How about that so-called guard rail speed trap? I heard it was an hoax originated in Switzerland.
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Old September 12th, 2008, 08:34 PM   #227
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ANALYSIS-U.S. shift to smaller cars raises safety questions

WASHINGTON, July 23 (Reuters) - An accelerating U.S. consumer shift from sport utility vehicles and pickups to more fuel-efficient cars should reduce rollover, but safety experts worry a lighter fleet poses serious risks despite air bags, anti-collision systems and other advances.

"Shifting to smaller vehicles will make the problem worse," said Adrian Lund, president of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, a group that measures crash test performance that is backed by insurance companies. "You're better off in a bigger vehicle than in a smaller one."

Distressed U.S. auto giants are moving to retool plants and leverage operations in Europe, Latin America and elsewhere to get more small cars to American consumers in coming years and meet tougher federal fuel economy standards.

U.S. sales are down in 2008 with gas prices above $4 a gallon and consumers caught in a slowing economy. But sales of compacts, sedans and other cars jumped 3 percent in June compared with a 19 percent drop for less efficient SUVs and pickups, according to Ward's Automotive Group.

General Motors Corp has ramped up production of its compact Chevrolet Cobalt and the subcompact Aveo and is working on the Volt electric car. Ford Motor Co plans to introduce the Fiesta to the United States in 2010. Chrysler LLC has a partnership with Nissan for the Japanese manufacturer to build it a small car based on a Chrysler design to better compete in the market.

Popular fuel-efficient compacts and sedans are made by Japan's Toyota Motor Corp and Honda Motor Co Ltd .

More than 40,000 people are killed annually on U.S. roads in traffic-related accidents. Three-quarters of the victims are in passenger vehicles with two-thirds of them, just under 19,000, in cars. Most were killed in front or side crashes, according to 2006 federal data, the latest available.

Fewer "higher riding" truck-style SUVs and pickups driven for everyday use should reduce rollovers, which account for about a quarter of all traffic fatalities, experts agree. But some note that cars are lighter, not as stiff and have less room inside to protect occupants in collisions with other vehicles and objects, such as poles and trees.

"When they hit narrow, vertical fixed-object hazards like telephone poles, a front-end collision at higher speeds results in deep intrusion, sometimes resulting in ripping the engine from its mounts and pushing it through the firewall into the occupants," Gerald Donaldson, senior research director for Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, an alliance of interests that includes insurance companies.

Donaldson said the government must toughen crash tests and finalize a rigorous roof strength standard.

BETTER CRASH PROTECTION

Rae Tyson, spokesman for the Transportation Department's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, said the government is aware of safety group concerns. He added it is too early to identify new trends.

NHTSA, Tyson said, is researching better crash protection as well as possible safety issues with batteries in hybrids and all-electric cars, and others that use biofuels.

Tyson said cars are well equipped and safer than during the last fuel-driven consumer shift to smaller vehicles in the 1970s when the death rate spiked.

"Back then there was a sacrifice because smaller cars being built did not match up to larger vehicles. That's not true now," Tyson said.

Jim Vondale, Ford's director of safety, said the automaker is learning more about making stronger vehicles in "smaller packages," trying to maximize energy they can absorb in crashes using higher-strength steel and other materials.

"Structural changes are some of the longest lead time changes you can make," Vondale said, noting Ford is trying to accelerate improvements in strength design, especially on models in Europe eventually headed to the U.S market.

Jake Fisher, senior automotive engineer for Consumer Reports, said automakers are "getting smarter" about design and are using more aluminum and forged alloy materials that are strong, lighter and more expensive than steel.

Smaller SUVs and cars, he reasoned, may do a better job than heavier ones of avoiding accidents in the first place because they can stop more quickly and are easier to handle.

The experts also noted benefits of greater seat belt use, front and side air bags, roll control systems, anti-lock brakes, and collision avoidance technologies.

"I don't think the sky is falling," Fisher said.
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Old September 12th, 2008, 08:45 PM   #228
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Smaller cars are not necessarily unsafer, but if half of the US still drives giant SUV's, yeah, in a collision, you're probably worse off in a smaller car. It keeps a vicious circle that way.

The Netherlands is the safest nation in road traffic, yet most of the cars are compacts or small sedans.
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Old September 12th, 2008, 08:48 PM   #229
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Yes, defensive driving in the US cannot be accomplished with a small car ... wonder why people love their SUVs so much.
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Old September 12th, 2008, 10:58 PM   #230
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Driving around in the US in a very small Chevrolet Aveo can be quite scary indeed Seriously, in such a car you definately have a smaller change of surviving a heavy accident than in a SUV. But if you want to stay driving 1 to 7 instead of 1 to 15, it's your choice
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Old September 13th, 2008, 09:52 AM   #231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCat View Post
However, for some reason, accident rates in Israel are significantly higher than
in most Western countries.
Hi Cat,

According to a report by the Central Bureau of Statistics http://www1.cbs.gov.il/shnaton58/st24_21.pdf, road deaths per 100,000 people in Israel were 5.9 in 2006, and 7.1 in 2000-2006.

Accident deaths have actually been going down consistenly since they peaked (in absolute numbers) in about 1973.
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Old December 15th, 2008, 06:00 PM   #232
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Fatalities: US v EU

Hello, just found this forum this morning!

I am looking for some information on safety and fatalities comparing US freeways to EU Motorways, in particular UK, Autobahn, and Autostrada and impacts of speed limits and lane usage (eg, left lane pass only). I've searched this forum and a few others and come up empty. I've backed in to some numbers on my own, but would prefer something better than backed in numbers (and from someone other than me).

Thanks,
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Old December 15th, 2008, 06:40 PM   #233
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This was something I was wondering about too...when I was in US I was almost shocked to see cars overtaking from both sides, I would say that is something that can increase the number of accidents on the road a lot!
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Old December 15th, 2008, 07:06 PM   #234
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You can measure traffic safety in various ways.

Common;

number of traffic deaths per 100.000 inhabitants
number of traffic deaths per x axle miles
number of traffic deaths per vehicle mileage

I think the last way is the best way to compare, since it gives an opportunity to compare by vehicle mileage. In that way, a couple of big accidents in a small country without much vehicle mileage cannot blur the statistics.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...ted_death_rate

For instance, the United States has 9 deaths per 1 billion vehicle kilometers. The Netherlands has 7.7 (one of the safest nations in the world), but I doubt if that's correct, since we had 800 traffic deaths, while we travelled 150 billion car kilometers, which would add up to 5.3 deaths per 1 billion vehicle kilometers.

Other industrialized nations like Belgium, Canada, Iceland, Ireland, New Zealand, Japan and South Korea have more deaths than the United States.
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Old December 15th, 2008, 07:34 PM   #235
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That isnt perfect either. In the US,most drivers are locals,so it doesnt matter who makes the accident,but here,there are a lot of foreign drivers,who might have a completely different driving culture than the locals. It might seem an irrelevant thing, but maybe a bulgarian driving style that works well in Bulgaria will end in death in Sweden...and that is neither because the locals cant drive,nor because the bulgarian couldnt drive,so not because it is not safe to drive there...
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Old December 15th, 2008, 08:13 PM   #236
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I agree. Many Dutchmen see Paris's traffic as crazy, but try to drive in Amsterdam and avoid all cyclists which swarm around you from all directions.
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Old December 15th, 2008, 08:22 PM   #237
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In Greece the major problem was the safety in roads, especially in old motorways because of many accidents causing by... stupidity of some drivers.
Now with new motorways the things are much better
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Old December 16th, 2008, 02:28 AM   #238
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Thanks all. Excellent points. The problem I'm having is getting US Interstate v. German Autobahn (v. UK Motorway v. Italian Autostrada). Which would be comparing apples to apples. I believe, and please correct me if I'm wrong, that whole country stats, even fatalities / km driven, are skewed by motorway v. non-motorway differences. For instance, in Germany it appears that a much higher percentage of fatalities are non-motorway (and a high number are single vehicle collisions with trees) v. the US which appears to have a higher percentage of motorway (interstate) fatalities.

Thanks,
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Old December 16th, 2008, 02:38 AM   #239
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I agree. Many Dutchmen see Paris's traffic as crazy, but try to drive in Amsterdam and avoid all cyclists which swarm around you from all directions.
You're supposed to avoid them?

The first time I ever drove outside the US was from Paris to Amsterdam. I was fine with Paris, but Amsterdam was rather amazing. The average street name was about 95 characters, many weren't marked (I assumed they couldn't fit them on the buildings), and once I was 2 blocks from our hotel (Radisson SAS) but was given directions for a 17 block route (actually) to get there. We laugh about it now, but that night we were tired and getting frustrated.

Anyway, the numbers I'd backed in to are US Interstate: 13/billion miles driven, Autobahn: 9/billion miles driven, Autostrada 11/billion miles driven.
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Old December 16th, 2008, 05:53 AM   #240
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RawLee View Post
That isnt perfect either. In the US,most drivers are locals,so it doesnt matter who makes the accident,but here,there are a lot of foreign drivers,who might have a completely different driving culture than the locals. It might seem an irrelevant thing, but maybe a bulgarian driving style that works well in Bulgaria will end in death in Sweden...and that is neither because the locals cant drive,nor because the bulgarian couldnt drive,so not because it is not safe to drive there...
You're right, but big countries like the US and Canada also have huge variations among states/provinces. For example, the only reason Canada is higher than the US is because, due to reasons unknown to me, some provinces/territories have an insanely high rate (PEI - 25, Yukon - 24.2). Some other provinces also have pretty high rates.

But the interesting thing is that Ontario's claim of having the safest roads in North America (or at least, one of the safest) seems to be true, being only 6, lower than most European countries. NWT seems to be even lower, but its population is tiny.

Check it out here.
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