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Old February 2nd, 2007, 11:38 PM   #21
Smelser
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris1491 View Post
it's easy; don't live near a motorway...
Given the studies parameter of a half-kilometre distance around the freeway, it's not going to be at all easy to remove all residences from that large an area.
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Old February 3rd, 2007, 12:17 PM   #22
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Given the studies parameter of a half-kilometre distance around the freeway, it's not going to be at all easy to remove all residences from that large an area.
Most motorways in The Netherlands are at least thirty years old. People know when they move, they're gonna live next to a motorway.
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Old April 9th, 2007, 04:43 AM   #23
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Cities do away with traffic signs...

I thought this was an interesting idea. Get rid of all traffic rules and people will drive safer... This fits with my preference for simplicity rather than overcomplicated solutions, but I have serious doubts whether this is actually feasible. What are your thoughts?


CONTROLLED CHAOS

European Cities Do Away with Traffic Signs
By Matthias Schulz

Are streets without traffic signs conceivable? Seven cities and regions in Europe are giving it a try -- with good results.

Ben Behnke Drachten in the Netherlands has gotten rid of 16 of its traffic light crossings and converted the other two to roundabouts. "We reject every form of legislation," the Russian aristocrat and "father of anarchism" Mikhail Bakunin once thundered. The czar banished him to Siberia. But now it seems his ideas are being rediscovered.

European traffic planners are dreaming of streets free of rules and directives. They want drivers and pedestrians to interact in a free and humane way, as brethren -- by means of friendly gestures, nods of the head and eye contact, without the harassment of prohibitions, restrictions and warning signs.

A project implemented by the European Union is currently seeing seven cities and regions clear-cutting their forest of traffic signs. Ejby, in Denmark, is participating in the experiment, as are Ipswich in England and the Belgian town of Ostende.

The utopia has already become a reality in Makkinga, in the Dutch province of Western Frisia. A sign by the entrance to the small town (population 1,000) reads "Verkeersbordvrij" -- "free of traffic signs." Cars bumble unhurriedly over precision-trimmed granite cobblestones. Stop signs and direction signs are nowhere to be seen. There are neither parking meters nor stopping restrictions. There aren't even any lines painted on the streets.

"The many rules strip us of the most important thing: the ability to be considerate. We're losing our capacity for socially responsible behavior," says Dutch traffic guru Hans Monderman, one of the project's co-founders. "The greater the number of prescriptions, the more people's sense of personal responsibility dwindles."

Monderman could be on to something. Germany has 648 valid traffic symbols. The inner cities are crowded with a colorful thicket of metal signs. Don't park over here, watch out for passing deer over there, make sure you don't skid. The forest of signs is growing ever denser. Some 20 million traffic signs have already been set up all over the country.

Psychologists have long revealed the senselessness of such exaggerated regulation. About 70 percent of traffic signs are ignored by drivers. What's more, the glut of prohibitions is tantamount to treating the driver like a child and it also foments resentment. He may stop in front of the crosswalk, but that only makes him feel justified in preventing pedestrians from crossing the street on every other occasion. Every traffic light baits him with the promise of making it over the crossing while the light is still yellow.

"Unsafe is safe"

The result is that drivers find themselves enclosed by a corset of prescriptions, so that they develop a kind of tunnel vision: They're constantly in search of their own advantage, and their good manners go out the window.

The new traffic model's advocates believe the only way out of this vicious circle is to give drivers more liberty and encourage them to take responsibility for themselves. They demand streets like those during the Middle Ages, when horse-drawn chariots, handcarts and people scurried about in a completely unregulated fashion. The new model's proponents envision today's drivers and pedestrians blending into a colorful and peaceful traffic stream.

It may sound like chaos, but it's only the lesson drawn from one of the insights of traffic psychology: Drivers will force the accelerator down ruthlessly only in situations where everything has been fully regulated. Where the situation is unclear, they're forced to drive more carefully and cautiously.

Indeed, "Unsafe is safe" was the motto of a conference where proponents of the new roadside philosophy met in Frankfurt in mid-October.

True, many of them aren't convinced of the new approach. "German drivers are used to rules," says Michael Schreckenberg of Duisburg University. If clear directives are abandoned, domestic rush-hour traffic will turn into an Oriental-style bazaar, he warns. He believes the new vision of drivers and pedestrians interacting in a cozy, relaxed way will work, at best, only for small towns.

But one German borough is already daring to take the step into lawlessness. The town of Bohmte in Lower Saxony has 13,500 inhabitants. It's traversed by a country road and a main road. Cars approach speedily, delivery trucks stop to unload their cargo and pedestrians scurry by on elevated sidewalks.

The road will be re-furbished in early 2007, using EU funds. "The sidewalks are going to go, and the asphalt too. Everything will be covered in cobblestones," Klaus Goedejohann, the mayor, explains. "We're getting rid of the division between cars and pedestrians."

The plans derive inspiration and motivation from a large-scale experiment in the town of Drachten in the Netherlands, which has 45,000 inhabitants. There, cars have already been driving over red natural stone for years. Cyclists dutifully raise their arm when they want to make a turn, and drivers communicate by hand signs, nods and waving.

"More than half of our signs have already been scrapped," says traffic planner Koop Kerkstra. "Only two out of our original 18 traffic light crossings are left, and we've converted them to roundabouts." Now traffic is regulated by only two rules in Drachten: "Yield to the right" and "Get in someone's way and you'll be towed."

Strange as it may seem, the number of accidents has declined dramatically. Experts from Argentina and the United States have visited Drachten. Even London has expressed an interest in this new example of automobile anarchy. And the model is being tested in the British capital's Kensington neighborhood.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/...448747,00.html
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Old April 9th, 2007, 07:52 AM   #24
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Rules and regulations were naturally developing and updating with the evolution of human civilisation. The key word is naturally. Now, to say that rules (traffic rules in particular) actually encourage people to drive unsafe would be an absurd. Think about it, would removing pedestrian crosswalks signs make it safer for pedestrians? Would removing signs "Give Way" and "Main Road" from an intersection with moderate to heavy traffic make it safer for drivers? I can't believe someone can seriously believe that.

You do it and here is what you get in return: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HO8Cat0JGr4
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Old April 9th, 2007, 08:02 AM   #25
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I agree with Alex. It is probably true that without traffic rules people would naturally be more careful to avoid being involved in an accident, but this is in fact bringing us way backwards, because traffic rules are designed to make driving less stressful (at least that's partially the way I see it). In other words, sure, in India, for example, cars, animals, and people all move relatively quickly on a road and somehow accidents do not seem to be that common, but driving becomes a real struggle for survival. The problem with traffic rules is when a large portion of the population follows them, but breaking the rules is common. In this case, people are used to the rules generally being followed, and blindly assume that everyone else will follow them. Then, of course, accidents happen when someone breaks the rules, and the person who follows them is not used to/trained to make a quick decision.

For example, in countries where traffic lights are mostly for decoration, running a red light is probably not very dangerous, as everyone expects that this will happen. On the other hand, blindly run a red light in a more developed country, and you will likely cause a major accident, because those who have a green light assume that they can actually go through the intersection unobstructed.

Rules are important and necessary, but they should be reasonable (that of course is a subject of a lot of debate), efficient, and people should follow them.
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Old April 9th, 2007, 10:10 AM   #26
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Plus there is also the small section of the population who pit their own needs above everyone else's and endanger everyone else on the road, and where they might bow down to the threat of persecution before, they're free to do as they please now.
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Old April 9th, 2007, 12:30 PM   #27
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This is really stupid. removing traffic lights! On busy intersections, you can never merge to the other way!

Why create some African kind of roadchaos in developed cities? That really doesn't make sense to me.
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Old April 17th, 2007, 07:16 PM   #28
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Highway Safety - Scrutinizing Older Drivers

Our view on highway safety: Scrutinize older drivers
When states fail to curb dangerous seniors, results can be tragic.

http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2007/...51.html?csp=34



Trying to persuade Grandpa that it's time to give up his driver's license is likely to be met with an irascible, if not downright hostile, response. Seniors know that physical and cognitive abilities decline with age, but they also fiercely prize their independence. Too many are in denial about their fading driving skills and won't voluntarily release their grip from the steering wheel.

The case for that difficult intervention — if not from families then from state governments — has never been more compelling. Elderly drivers are more likely to be involved in fatal crashes at traffic intersections than are younger drivers, according to a report issued last month by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

By 2030, the number of licensed drivers ages 65 and older will nearly double to about 57 million — about one in five drivers. Yet efforts by states to evaluate the abilities of older motorists aren't nearly as stringent as new limits being placed on teens, who increasingly face restrictions on night driving, the number of passengers they can carry and other matters.

That's happening because motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among 15- to 19-year-olds. But drivers older than 75 are even more at risk, as you can see from the chart nearby. They deserve equal scrutiny, and according to a new study by Congress' Government Accountability Office, they aren't getting it:

*Only 16 states demand that seniors undergo more frequent license renewals than non-seniors.

*Only 10 states require older drivers to undergo extra vision assessments.

*Only five states require older drivers to renew their licenses in person.

*Only New Hampshire and Illinois require road tests for those 75 and older.

In addition, little is done to screen older drivers for dementia, a condition that's likely to affect nearly half of those 85 and older. The risk of a crash for drivers with dementia are two to eight times greater than those with no cognitive impairment.

When states fail to get dangerous senior citizens off the roads, the results can be tragic.

Almost four years ago, George Russell Weller, then 86, drove his car through a crowded farmers' market in Santa Monica, Calif., killing 10 people and injuring more than 70. He mistook the car's accelerator for the brake, his attorney said.

In Dallas, teen Katie Bolka was killed last year when a 90-year-old driver ran a red light and slammed into her car. A bill known as "Katie's Law" is being considered in the Texas Legislature to impose new restrictions, including required vision tests, for elderly drivers.

Tougher regulations would no doubt be inconvenient and perhaps insulting to older drivers. But for their own safety and the well-being of others, states and families need to act to avert preventable tragedies.

Posted at 12:21 AM/ET, April 17, 2007
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Old April 22nd, 2007, 07:50 AM   #29
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Global Road Safety - Africa & Middle East Top Road Deaths

Africa, Middle East top global road deaths list-WHO

GENEVA, April 19 (Reuters) - Africa's roads are by far the world's most dangerous with more than 24 in every 100,000 of the continent's population dying on them annually, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Thursday.

The Middle East comes next with nearly 18 in every 100,000 losing their lives in traffic incidents each year, according to a report issued to mark the start of the United Nations first Global Road Safety Week.

Worldwide, the report said, nearly 1.2 million men, women and children are killed on the roads every year, and a linked forecast said the figure would double by the year 2020 unless governments took action to improve safety.

While poorer countries are the worst affected, more young people -- nearly 400,000 -- between the ages of 10 and 24 die every year in road incidents than from any other cause, including HIV-AIDS, the WHO added.

"The lack of safety on our roads has become an important obstacle to health and development," said WHO Director-General Margaret Chan in a comment issued with the report. "Our children and young adults are among the most vulnerable."

Chan rejected the use of the term "accidents". "Road traffic crashes are not 'accidents'," she declared. "We need to challenge the notion that they are unavoidable and make room for a pro-active, preventive approach."

In richer countries, where more people can afford cars, death rates are much lower than in Africa and the Middle East, according to the report. The average of deaths in western Europe, the United States and Canada is around 11 per 100,000.

MOST PREDICTABLE

The bulk of fatal road incidents are predictable and preventable, the report said. Many involve children playing on the street who could be given better leisure facilities and young pedestrians who must be better educated about dangers. The report, "Youth and Road Safety," said some 90 percent of all deaths were in middle-and lower-income countries, where pedestrians, cyclists and motor-cyclists accounted for a majority of the victims, both dead and injured.

A separate U.N. assessment issued before the report said that when surviving victims are not poor to begin with, they and their families are often plunged into poverty by the consequences of their injuries.

"Without collective action, the death toll is predicted to almost double by 2020," said the assessment, emerging from a session of a U.N. Stakeholders Forum on Global Road Safety.

The WHO report said fatal or near-fatal traffic incidents cost an estimated $518 billion globally in material damage, health and other consequences. In some countries the cost is up to 1.5 percent of GNP, more than they receive in foreign development aid.

In richer countries, lowering speed limits, campaigning against drunk driving and enforcing the use of seat belts and motorcycle helmets, as well as creating safe play areas for children, have reduced the number of road deaths and injuries.
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Old April 22nd, 2007, 10:59 AM   #30
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I've noticed Western Australia seems to have a high rate of fatalities on the highway system. For just 2 million people in the state roughly, there have been something like 80 deaths already this year.
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Old April 22nd, 2007, 02:10 PM   #31
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Hell, do you see how people drive in those African and Middle East countries? That is asking for problems. All those drivers looks like they wanna commit suicide or something...

It's just the general behaviour of the drivers there; overtaking left and right all the time, speeding, exiting suddenly, pedestrians crossing motorway-like roads, no traffic lights, and no police to force the rules.

And most African countries don't have a proper infrastructure, especially not in cities. Like Khartoum (Sudan), most arteries are just dust roads. And if there is a motorwaylike road, they drive 4 cars next to eachother instead of safe 2.
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Old April 24th, 2007, 09:13 AM   #32
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Heh sometimes I also think the general impatience of drivers comes as a result
of constant nervousness and a tense political situation.

Israel is probably one of few countries in the ME where driving is more or less
the same as in Western countries (infrastructure is quite good, people generally
follow traffic rules, and police presence/red light/speed cameras are very
abundant). Driver education in Israel is also much stricter than in North America
(there is a relatively high number of mandatory lessons, and the test is quite
difficult, with many people passing it only after several tries at least).
However, for some reason, accident rates in Israel are significantly higher than
in most Western countries.

I think it also partially has to do with the fact that the geography often results
in very "difficult" roads, filled with sharp curves and grades.
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Old April 24th, 2007, 09:37 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvin W View Post
I've noticed Western Australia seems to have a high rate of fatalities on the highway system. For just 2 million people in the state roughly, there have been something like 80 deaths already this year.
well, that is 4/100,000. and if that is only for half the year, than 8/100,000.
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Old April 25th, 2007, 08:10 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCat View Post
Heh sometimes I also think the general impatience of drivers comes as a result
of constant nervousness and a tense political situation.

Israel is probably one of few countries in the ME where driving is more or less
the same as in Western countries (infrastructure is quite good, people generally
follow traffic rules, and police presence/red light/speed cameras are very
abundant). Driver education in Israel is also much stricter than in North America
(there is a relatively high number of mandatory lessons, and the test is quite
difficult, with many people passing it only after several tries at least).
However, for some reason, accident rates in Israel are significantly higher than
in most Western countries.

I think it also partially has to do with the fact that the geography often results
in very "difficult" roads, filled with sharp curves and grades.
Or maybe Israel is more car dependent that many European cities? After all, no Israeli cities have rapid transit.
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Old April 27th, 2007, 11:37 AM   #35
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every year, 100000 death in traffic accident in china.
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Old April 28th, 2007, 06:37 PM   #36
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Road traffic crashes leading cause of death among young people
WHO

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/.../en/index.html
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Old April 29th, 2007, 06:35 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LtBk View Post
Or maybe Israel is more car dependent that many European cities? After all, no Israeli cities have rapid transit.
I doubt that's the reason. Car ownership rates in most Western countries are still significantly higher than in Israel (even though the gap is becoming smaller every year). Also, don't forget that Western countries includes the US and Canada, which, despite their cities having RT systems, are quite car dependent I'd say.
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Old July 18th, 2007, 07:30 PM   #38
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Living near high traffic raises heart risks -study

DALLAS, July 16 (Reuters) - Living near a busy highway may be bad for your heart.

Long-term exposure to air pollution from a nearby freeway or busy road can raise the risk of hardening of the arteries, which can lead to heart disease and stroke, German researchers reported Monday.

"The most important finding of our study is that living close to high traffic, a major source of urban air pollution, is associated with atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries - the blood vessels that supply the heart," Dr. Barbara Hoffmann, who led the study, said in a statement.

"This is the first study to actually show a relationship between long-term traffic exposure and coronary atherosclerosis," said Hoffmann, of the University of Duisburg-Essen in Germany.

The study is published in this week's issue of Circulation, an American Heart Association journal.

Previous studies have linked elevated levels of air pollution to an increased risk of heart problems, but this is the first to demonstrate that living near high traffic is associated with coronary atherosclerosis.

The study looked at 4,494 adults, aged 45 to 74, in three large cities in the industrialized Ruhr area of Germany.

Doctors examined the participants, looking especially for coronary artery calcification, which occurs when fatty plaques forming in the artery walls become calcified, or hardened.

Researchers found that compared with people who lived more than 200 meters (yards) from major traffic, the chance of high coronary artery calcification was 63 percent greater for those living within 50 meters (160 feet).

For people within 51 meters to 100 meters (164 feet to 328 feet) the chance was 34 percent higher. It was 8 percent higher for those within 100 meters to 200 meters (328 feet to 642 feet) of heavy traffic.

These percentages take into account age, gender, smoking and high blood pressure.

A five-year follow up study is set to be completed next year.

"Politicians, regulators and physicians need to be aware that living close to heavy traffic may pose an increased risk of harm to the heart. Potential harm due to proximity to heavy traffic should be considered when planning new buildings and roads," Hoffmann said.
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Old July 24th, 2007, 02:03 AM   #39
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http://www.google.com/maphp?hl=en&q=...&t=k&z=17&om=0

The large building was built in the 80's as a newspaper HQ, but was abandoned for years until being renovated and reopened about five years ago as a middle school, grades 6 thru 8. The adjacent freeway is 6+6,7+7 between interchanges, and carries over 250,000 vehicles per day.

OT: the surrounding area is dominated by apartments, so the student body is very transient.

This is what passes for good public policy in my community. What's especially irritating is that the even people I know who are active on education issues thought it was a great idea, a way to relieve overcrowded schools on the cheap. Amazing.
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Old July 27th, 2007, 04:53 AM   #40
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Why people are so obessed with the left lane?

Nothing pisses me and most drivers more than people who drive slow on the fast lane and hog it up when a line of cars are tailgating and the right lane is clear. And not just on freeways, but on multi-lane arterial roads as well. What is it with the left lane that makes drivers lose logic?
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