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Old January 7th, 2007, 06:18 AM   #661
Rovert42986
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I loveee most of the projects, and feel like the NYC skyline could use more modern skyscrapers, although i think that the Freedom Tower has just been taking an incredibly long time, due to all the bureaucracy/controversy surrounding it.
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Old January 8th, 2007, 02:08 AM   #662
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/01052007...lois_weiss.htm
WHOLE FOODS TASTE FOR WEST SIDE TOWER

By LOIS WEISS

January 5, 2007 -- Organic supermarket Whole Foods is among the retailers sniffing around an upcoming 30-story tower on the Upper West Side, The Post has learned.

According to sources, the developers of the apartment building, which is being constructed on land in the Park West Village apartment complex, are being approached by other retailers as well.

The developers, a partnership between Joseph Chetrit and Stellar Management's Larry Gluck, did not return calls for comment.

The retailer is being pitched by Winick Realty. Calls to Jeffrey Winick were also not returned by press time.

Architect Costas Kondylis designed the masonry building, which has the addresses of 808 Columbus Ave. and 100 W. 100th St. His representative did not return calls.
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Old January 8th, 2007, 02:10 AM   #663
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/07/ny...=1&oref=slogin
In Faded Beach Community Seeking Rebirth, Projects and Luxury Homes Meet

By COREY KILGANNON
Published: January 7, 2007


Robert Stolarick for The New York Times

Gang fights have plagued the Hammel public housing project, which abuts the upscale Arverne by the Sea development in the Rockaways.


In a gritty section of the Rockaways, there is a cluster of new homes that stand out for their catchy colors and modern style. They are laid out in neat clusters with cheery nautical names like Ocean Breeze, The Sands and The Breakers, and there are newly mapped streets with names like Spinnaker Drive.

This is the early phase of the mammoth Arverne by the Sea development, a heralded project to make over a mostly blighted stretch of the Rockaway peninsula into 2,300 homes and condominiums.

There are snazzy showroom apartments with stunning ocean views, and a warm-and-fuzzy short film featuring families frolicking on the beach. The promotional material makes no mention of the surrounding low-income area of meager houses, shabby bungalows and public housing projects, but rather urges potential buyers to “imagine the serenity of living in an oceanfront community.”

That serenity has been interrupted in recent weeks by gunshots from the nearby projects, a spate of violence that has left three young men from the projects dead.

Some community leaders and elected officials say the violence is sparked by an escalating conflict turf war between gangs at several of the housing projects.

“This is a gang war between housing projects,” said Councilman James Sanders Jr., who has met with the police and community leaders.

The unrest has also worried officials at the Benjamin-Beechwood company, which is building the Arverne development. The 117-acre development stretches into low-income, primarily black neighborhoods that include the Ocean Bay Houses, a public housing complex formerly known as the Edgemere Houses, and the Hammel Houses, which abut the western edge of the development.

Though the Rockaways were once a popular beach resort, the expanse of trash-strewn lots that overlook pristine beaches has remained undeveloped for decades. It is premium oceanfront real estate accessible to Manhattan, but it is also a low-income area with few amenities and high crime rates. These are challenges the developer counts on overcoming in building two-family oceanfront homes costing up to $1 million.

A company official, Gerry Romski, said that police officials from the 100th Precinct assured him that extra police units had been brought in to help patrol the projects and that “the situation was under control.”

“These seem to be isolated incidents limited to the housing projects, the Hammels and Edgemere Houses,” Mr. Romski said. “We have not been impacted in any way. We’ve increased the security guards around our buildings, and there have been no incidents.”

The shootings, which received meager attention in the news media, have not affected the brisk sales of the units, he said. Roughly 500 of the planned 2,300 units are completed, he said, and most of those are occupied.

Eric Rasmussen, 26, a city firefighter, recently moved into the Coral House, an apartment building that is part of the Arverne development. It overlooks Building 10 of the Hammel project, the site of one of the shootings. “You definitely hear gunshots over there pretty regularly,” Mr. Rasmussen said. “But I don’t consider it dangerous.”

Mr. Sanders calls the violence and the ensuing response by developers — initial panic, then relief that it did not affect their development — a microcosm of “exactly what is wrong here in the Rockaways.”

Mr. Sanders contends that development officials are “trying to build a self-contained city” while ignoring the surrounding community and its ills: unemployment, gangs, guns, drugs and troubled schools.

“We’re going to be stuck with a tale of two cities,” Mr. Sanders said. “They’re creating the conditions for a perfect storm of racial discontent and possibly more violence.

“This situation cannot be dealt with by simply increasing security and police and arresting and imprisoning more young people.”

Community leaders have long complained that the Rockaways have been a dumping ground for the city’s poor. The residents of the housing projects, an overwhelming majority of them black, have few nearby job opportunities, social and youth and parolee services. They complain of being isolated on the peninsula.

Mr. Sanders said the recent violence stemmed from turf battles between gang members at the Ocean Bay Houses, the Hammel Houses and the Redfern Houses, which are farther east, in Far Rockaway.

On Nov. 27, Christopher Glenn, 16, of the Ocean Bay Houses, was shot and killed. On Dec. 15, another teenager, Cedric Smalls, 18, was fatally shot in front of Building 10 of the Hammel Houses. Four days later, Laton Spurgeon, 25, an Ocean Bay resident, was killed.

Last week, Jamel Bryant, 17, who the police say is a Bloods street gang member with a street name of Psycho, was arrested at the Ocean Bay Houses after firing eight bullets at police officers, the department said.

Mr. Smalls was one of 11 children of Cynthia Young and had moved with six of his siblings from the Hammel Houses into the apartment of his grandmother, Algia Young, 71, a block away. His grandmother said Cedric kept hanging out with his friends in the project, but he denied being in a gang.

“I used to check his backpack and go through his pockets every night to see if he was up to anything,” she said. “He was a good kid.”

She looked out her window toward the Arverne development and said, “How they going to build that thing when they can’t even take care of the community now?”

But Mr. Romski said the development had good relations with its neighbors and would benefit the rest of the Rockaways by bringing jobs, shopping and recreational facilities.

He said the development would bridge communities by serving as a link between poorer black areas of Far Rockaway and wealthier white sections such as Breezy Point, Neponsit and Belle Harbor. Arverne by the Sea is attracting many retailers, he said, and a new Y.M.C.A. center on the property will be open to outside residents.

“This project is going to pull up the rest of the community,” he said.
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Old January 8th, 2007, 02:15 AM   #664
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/07/re...ref=realestate
The Lure of Living Above It All

By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY
Published: January 7, 2007


Tina Fineberg for The New York Times

ALL THEY SURVEY Christine Harris and her boyfriend are buying a $2.5 million 11th-floor penthouse on West 28th Street. The unit should be completed next summer.



Patrick Andrade for The New York Times

A penthouse at 170 East End Avenue will look over the East River.



Patrick Andrade for The New York Times

LIGHT AND AIR Sweeping views, like the ones from the penthouse under construction on the 19th floor at 170 East End Avenue and outdoor space are two of the appeals of penthouse living.



Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

Glorimar O’Hara plans to put up a swing set and sandbox for her 14-month-old son, Henry, on the terrace of the O’Haras’ new triplex on 13th Street. It will also double as an outdoor movie theater.


IT is a fine feeling to step into the elevator of an apartment building, press the button marked “PH” and take a ride to the top — or at least near the top. And at a time when the wealthiest New Yorkers are getting even wealthier, there are more buildings in Manhattan with many more of these elevator buttons that bespeak the privileges of penthouse living.

Christine Harris, a 34-year-old director at UBS Global Asset Management in Manhattan, expects to experience that feeling when she and her boyfriend move into their $2.5 million 11th-floor penthouse on the northern edges of Chelsea when the apartment is completed next summer.

Speaking by telephone over the clatter of the UBS trading floor, Ms. Harris calmly envisioned opening her apartment to friends for French feasts and glasses of pinot, and unwinding after work on her private 700-square-foot terrace.

“It’s just nice to come home on a summer night and have a bottle of wine when you’re in all of this madness in the city,” she said.

While many Manhattan developers are scrambling to find buyers for their newly constructed and converted luxury apartments, they say they’re having little trouble selling their penthouses, which have become the trinkets of choice in the wake of the city’s record Wall Street bonus season. These apartments, which have accounted for just 2.5 percent of the sales transactions in Manhattan over roughly the last two decades, are now often selling faster than the cheaper studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments.

At Ms. Harris’s new building, the Onyx at 261 West 28th Street, Bronfman Haymes Real Estate Partners has contracts to sell all three of the building’s penthouses, while 30 of the other 52 units remain unsold.

At 170 East End Avenue (at 88th Street), Skyline Developers sold one penthouse for $12 million, and the one next door for $14 million. Skyline’s president, Orin Wilf, said he had turned down an offer of $14.5 million to see if he could get $16 million for each of the two remaining penthouses. Fifty-one of the 93 units are unsold in the building. He said he had negotiated on prices for apartments on the lower floors in the past.

Mr. Wilf says he thinks that the penthouses will sell even better when buyers see the completed apartments. “We’re in no rush to sell them,” he said while standing in one half-constructed penthouse over the barks of dogs in Carl Schurz Park, 19 stories below.

Even at 15 Central Park West (at 61st Street), all 15 penthouses in the project’s two buildings have been sold for prices as high as $45 million, while about 30 of the building’s 202 units remain unsold. “I wish we had 20 more to sell,” said William Lie Zeckendorf, a co-chairman of Zeckendorf Development.

Penthouses, which once were identified more with bachelors and newlyweds seeking terrace space for their cocktail parties, are even attracting the stroller crowd, which seems to like the extra bedrooms and terraces found in the newer residential buildings.

When Gregory O’Hara, a private equity investor, needed to relocate his family to New York from Miami, his wife, Glorimar, started looking for homes that would give them some outdoor space for their 14-month-old son, Henry.

The couple bought a $5.5 million triplex at 5 East 13th Street. Standing in the penthouse she will move into next month, Ms. O’Hara described her plans to set up a swing set, sandbox and outdoor movie theater on the terrace as Henry grinned and toddled his first tentative steps.

“It may be great for a bachelor, but it’s great for a family,” Ms. O’Hara said. “We have lots of outdoor space.”

Brokers say that Wall Street and hedge fund executives are often the first in line for penthouses, because the apartments confirm their “master of the universe” status among their neighbors.

Maureen Carroll, who previously worked on Wall Street and who now has her own brokerage firm specializing in selling apartments to Wall Street executives, had one client turn down an apartment when he found out there was a better one in the building.

The “second best” notion apparently contradicts these executives’ self-image. “They’re not going to live in a building where they’re the second-largest shareholder or there’s another unit that’s larger,” Ms. Carroll said. “The game doesn’t stop when you go home at night.”

Average prices for penthouses in Manhattan jumped by 16.6 percent to $2.3 million in 2006, from $2 million in 2005, according to data collected by the Miller Samuel appraisal company. The number of deals jumped to 225 in 2006, from 184 in 2005. Jonathan J. Miller, the company’s president, predicts these numbers will grow in 2007 because most penthouse buyers like Ms. Harris have not yet closed on their new condominiums.

These strong penthouse sales are persuading more developers to push the limits on how they define penthouses, and in some cases, they are making them more lavish than ever before. Shaun Osher, the chief executive of Core Group Marketing, which is handling the Onyx, is advising developers on the 25 other projects his company represents, to design all of their penthouses with more elaborate finishes so that they can ask even higher prices.

Josh Guberman, the president and chief executive of the Core Development Group (which has no relation to Mr. Osher’s firm), sold the O’Haras their triplex at 5 East 13th only 48 hours after sales began last summer. He said he now planned to divide one penthouse in his next project, on the Upper East Side, into two duplexes, which will be priced at $5.5 million each.

Edward Minskoff, the president of Edward J. Minskoff Equities Inc., sold five penthouses at 101 Warren Street in TriBeCa at prices ranging from $4 million to $20 million within 10 days of its opening last April. Since then, he has sold about 150 of the building’s 227 apartments. He is now building more apartments on top of the building than he had originally planned.

Donald J. Trump, who has been trying to sell his penthouse on the 31st and 32nd floors of 502 Park Avenue (59th Street) for $32 million on and off for the last two years, is now enlarging the master bedroom suite to about 1,400 square feet, up from 665 square feet, by enclosing an existing terrace and building a new terrace on top. He said he now planned to list the apartment at $42 million because the new terrace space will be on the higher floor and will open from the living room.

While Mr. Trump’s penthouse is, in fact, on the top two floors, he contends that the definition of a penthouse has now become broader, a point his peers have also caught on to.

“Penthouses are starting to go lower and lower in terms of the top of the building,” Mr. Trump said. “The top three, four or even five or six floors of the building can be defined as penthouses. The key is the number you put on the elevator.”

Mr. Trump says he typically builds six floors of penthouses in his towers. Mr. Minskoff calls the apartments on the 34th and 35th floors at 101 Warren “sky homes” and the apartments on the 32nd and 33rd floors penthouses.

On the other hand, at the Onyx, Matthew Bronfman and Evan Haymes stick to a strict interpretation: only the apartments on the top floor, the 11th, are called penthouses.

There are also penthouses in far shorter buildings. Mr. Guberman refers to the apartments on the top floor of his six-story building at 5 East 13th Street as penthouses, and he plans to do the same for his Upper East Side duplexes.

Michael Morris, a professor in Columbia’s psychology department and the head of a social intelligence program at its business school, said the trend in penthouses revealed a marked preference for displays of conspicuous consumption. He said the people buying the penthouses exhibit their wealth by purchasing real estate that is physically higher than their neighbors’, even if their apartments offer little more than views of surrounding buildings.

In many cases, he said, such buyers would rather have a penthouse on a high floor of a new building than an apartment in a prestigious but shorter building like the Dakota. “It’s a very simple marker of status,” Professor Morris said. “It’s very easy to see. It’s very easy for other people to see.”

But some penthouse buyers reject the idea that their purchases have anything to do with status. They say that newly constructed penthouses typically offer the most room, highest ceilings and most expansive terraces. They emphasize the privacy that such spaces can create in the heart of Manhattan.

Maria Bosoni and her husband, Alexandre, have put down a deposit for the $12 million penthouse on the 19th floor of 170 East End Avenue. The Bosonis currently live in a penthouse in the Bloomberg Tower.

Ms. Bosoni sees no special cachet in the “penthouse” designation. “It makes no difference to us,” she said. “It’s just that the penthouse is the better apartment. It makes for a better apartment because of the square footage and the height.”

Brokers agree that while their buyers are pretty direct about what they want from their penthouses, they also like the fact that newly built versions have more room than those of the past.

Servants were typically the city’s earliest inhabitants of apartment buildings’ top floors, because getting up there involved climbing so many stairs. Few New Yorkers wanted to spend time on terraces because of the black soot spewing from the elevated trains.

Kathy Sloane, a senior vice president of Brown Harris Stevens and the broker for Mr. Trump’s apartment at 502 Park, said that buyers who think they want a prewar penthouse may not like what they find.

“Penthouses were more difficult to sell because they’re often quirky,” she said. “They weren’t designed to be penthouses. People weren’t necessarily ready to take on the task of making a great penthouse out of a lot of rooms.”

Developers are also expanding the definition of penthouse to link it more to lifestyle than to height. Mr. Guberman is adding play areas to the fifth-, sixth- and seventh-floor apartments at a second East Side project, at 433 East 74th Street, to attract family buyers. He plans to call the seventh-floor apartments penthouses and the fifth- and sixth-floor units “flex” penthouses.

“A penthouse talks to the world of exclusion and privacy,” Mr. Guberman said. “It doesn’t really matter if it has five stories or eight stories. Once you get up there, it’s about having your own oasis separate and removed from the balance of the building.”

Mr. Minskoff, the creator of sky homes and penthouses at 101 Warren, said that even he can be confused by the definitions he has come up with. “They’re all very large apartments with high ceilings almost at the top of the building,” he said. “I’m not sure if you can absolutely differentiate.”

Mr. Trump is cautious about how long the penthouse craze may last and won’t say how many penthouses he may build in his next New York project, a condo in SoHo that won’t be completed for two and a half years. But he contends that penthouses will always have more allure than brownstones, with their understated charms.

“I live in a beautiful penthouse because I love the views,” Mr. Trump said. “I look at brownstones: You’re looking at garbage cans, and you look at air-conditioning units. You just can’t compare.”
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Old January 9th, 2007, 12:26 AM   #665
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interesting article!
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Old January 9th, 2007, 03:10 AM   #666
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Light Beneath the Streets
Take a tour of the future Fulton Street Transit Center, a complex in lower Manhattan that is intended to straighten out the tangle of platforms and mezzanines below Fulton Street. Sweet interactive display on the new station.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/08/ny...=1&oref=slogin



this is really nice to understand what they will be doing. It is going to be really nice. The entire project will cost $750 million and will completed in 2009. The station will connect 12 subway lines along with the new PATH station at the Trade Center site. The main building is really nice too.



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Old January 16th, 2007, 01:21 AM   #667
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Marketing starts for The Visionaire





12-JAN-07

Marketing has started for The Visionaire, a 33-story residential condominium building at 70 Little West Street, the last residential site in Battery Park City.

The building will have 251 condominiums and occupy the block bounded by Battery Place, Little West Street, Second Place and Third Place.

The building, which will overlook the Museum of Jewish Heritage, will be distinguished by a curved fażade and 40,000 square feet in the 500,000-square foot project will be occupied by the Battery Park City Parks Conservancy.

The Albanese Organization and the Starwood Capital Group Global at the developers.

Completion is anticipated in 2008.

It is the third residential project of The Albanese Organization, which is based in Garden City, Long Island, at Hugh L. Carey Battery Park City. SCLE and Pelli Clarke Pelli are the architectural firms for the project. Pelli Clarke Pelli also designed the developer's two other projects at Battery Park city, the 27-story Solaire at 20 River Terrace and the 24-story Verdesian at 211 North End Avenue.

Like the Verdesian and the Solaire, the new building will be "green," that is, constructed to minimize energy costs.

The Albanese Organization's other major project in Manhattan is 100 United Nations Plaza.

The building's southern fażade is pointed on its west side and rounded on its east side. The rendering of the building, which has two setbacks, at the right shows a view of the tower from the northeast.

The building will have a "high-efficiency fresh-air supply and exhaust system, centrally filtered water, an in-building wastewater treatment system that resupplies toilets and central air-conditioning makeup water, and rainwater will be harvested on the pesticide-free roof gardens.

Apartments have "sustainably harvested wood" floors, washers and dryers, pre-wiring for motorized window treatments, and "an open kitchen finished with natural materials chosen for their intrinsic beauty and interplay of textures - as well as their environmentally responsible and healthful properties."

Kitchens will have bamboo cabinets, "river-washed absolute black granite counters and backsplashes made from bricks of art glass by Waterworks. Master bathrooms will have teak cabinets, limestone floors and glass mosaic tiles.

The building will have a doorman and 24-hour concierge, a fitness center with skylit swimming pool, a children's playroom, bicycle storage, 24-hour valet parking garage, residents-only lunge for entertaining with natural gas fireplace, pool table and screening room, and a lobby with a 12-foot tropical aquarium.


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Old January 16th, 2007, 08:02 PM   #668
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nice tower, like the design
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Old January 16th, 2007, 11:19 PM   #669
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krull View Post
Parke-Bernet Galleries: A Blocky Base for Proposed Towers



Earlier this year, Aby Rosen announced plans to restore the
Parke-Bernet building to its 1949 appearance, as long as he
could add a pair of interlocking oval glass apartment towers,
designed by Norman Foster. The taller would rise to 30 stories.



NOW AND THEN The Parke-Bernet building in 1954.

Landmarks Commission Parks Parke-Bernet Plan
They like it the way it is.


By Felix Gillette | January 16, 2007

Tuesday morning, in a major victory for the city's historic preservationists, the members of the Landmarks Preservation Commission more or less shot down developer Aby Rosen's plans for the redevelopment of the Parke-Bernet building at 980 Madison Avenue. Although the commission did not officially kill the project today, it became clear throughout the course of the hearing that without huge modifications, the proposal as it currently stands has little hope of ever getting built.

Along the way, various commissioners praised Rosen's plans, which would restore the five-story building to its original 1949 design and add on top of the exiting structure a nuzzling pair of glass towers, reaching some thirty stories into the sky. That said, all but one commissioner noted that they could not support the current proposal due to problems with its scale, massing, materials, and location.

Commissioner Joan Gerner called the proposed structure "an architectural masterpiece." Albeit, one that had failed to win her support. "My issue is with the location," said Gerner. "This building belongs on a vacant site."

In other words, not on top of an existing building. And not in the midst of the Upper East Side Historic District.

Other commission members said that despite his best effort, renowned British architect Norman Foster had failed thus far to come up with an architectural scheme that would properly harmonize the proposed glass towers with the existing limestone-clad base.

"I'm an authority on marriages," said Commissioner (and practicing minister) Thomas Pike. "And this marriage makes me nervous."

A few minutes later, Commissioner Margery Perlmutter suggested that the project might be appropriate in some Blade-Runner-like version of the future, when every vacant inch of the city has been filled. But for the time being, she too gave the proposal a thumbs-down.

Not surprisingly, the proceedings were well attended. Ever since news of the proposal first became public this past fall, the project has been dividing neighbors throughout the Upper East Side. Today, a large crowd of supports and detractors packed into the hearing.


@Thevillagevoice.com
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Old January 16th, 2007, 11:20 PM   #670
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Very dissapointing news.
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Old January 17th, 2007, 05:57 AM   #671
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what a bunch of douchebags. filthy rich moronic.... (walks off swearing to himself)
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Old January 17th, 2007, 06:20 AM   #672
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Here is a little more about this sad news...


Landmarks faults Foster's design for 980 Madison





16-JAN-07

The Landmarks Preservation Commission this morning concluded a public hearing on a controversial planned residential addition to the five-story building at 980 Madison Avenue opposite the Carlyle Hotel, and nine of the 10 commissioners present indicated they did not find the design appropriate.

The 11-member commission, however, did not take a formal vote and Chairman Robert B. Tierney invited the developer, Aby J. Rosen, and his architect, Lord Norman Foster, to return when they have come up with a design that might meet many of the concerns raised by the commissioners.

Those concerns had mostly to do with the height and massing of the proposed 22-story addition that would have contained 18 condominium apartments and also with the question of whether it might establish a precedent for tall towers in historic districts.

After the meeting, Mr. Rosen indicated that he was pleased that the commission indicated it was not opposed to a rooftop addition to the existing building, which was erected in 1950 for Parke-Bernet, the auction house that was subsequently bought by Sotheby's, and altered substantially about two decades ago.

Mr. Rosen is the owner of the Seagram Building and Lever House and most of the commissioners had very high praise for the Mr. Foster and his design, but not atop the existing building.

The proposal would have restored the existing building's fażade by removing about 50 windows and a floor that had been added would have been replaced with a sculpture garden atop a landscaped and slanted inwards roof.

Foster's design for the apartment tower was placed at the north end of the block-long building between 76th and 77th Street and would have been a joined bundle of two glass-clad towers of unequal height and with curved facades.

Mr. Rosen indicated that his team will study the feasibility of a lower tower as well as one with a warmer color fażade that would be, in Mr. Foster's words, "more "bronzy" than the silvery design first presented.

Mr. Foster is also designing a mixed-use tower for Mr. Rosen at 610 Lexington Avenue immediately behind the Seagram Building. Mr. Foster's design for Tower 2 at Ground Zero for Silverstein Properties was recently unveiled. Mr. Foster's notched glass tower addition to the landmark Hearst Building on the southwest corner of Eighth Avenue and 57th Street was completed last year to widespread acclaim.

Mr. Foster told the commission that the landmark process was "definitely enlightening" but also "frustrating," adding after today's hearing that said that while he was disappointed that his design was not approved, architects have to be "optimistic," adding that the project is "a work in progress." He had argued that a vertical addition was more appropriate than "heavy layering" of a horizontal addition, and that a glass rather than masonry fażade was an "appropriate counterpoint," citing similar additions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural History and the Morgan Library as "happy marriages."

Commissioner Margery Perlmutter expressed concerns about what an approval of the design would mean as a precedent for building over low-rise buildings in historic districts. The city, she continued, is not yet "Bladerunner fashion," referring to the monumental height and scale of the urban environment in the movie "Bladerunner," adding that "we have plenty of places still to grow."

Commissioner Joan Gerner said that "the project holds it place with any modern building in the city," but "unlike the Hearst building the Parke-Bernet Building was never intended to be added to and the project is not appropriate."

Chairman Tierney described Foster's design as "brilliant," but called for a "rethinking," adding that "It is not consistent with the landmarks law as we are given to uphold it," he declared.

Jan Hird Pokorny was the only commissioner to support the project.


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Old January 17th, 2007, 08:58 PM   #673
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I loved not only that design, but how it was implemented. I'd take the addition design itself, make it twice as tall and put it somewhere else in Manhattan, maybe DT for instance.
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Old January 18th, 2007, 10:36 PM   #674
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today i've found an german article about that tower....they say it'll never be build
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Old January 18th, 2007, 11:46 PM   #675
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^ Something will but doesn't sound too exciting...


A Pledge To ‘Completely' Alter 980 Madison Plan


By GABRIELLE BIRKNER
January 17, 2007

After his proposal to erect a 22-story glass-and-steel tower atop a Madison Avenue low-rise was criticized sharply yesterday by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, developer Aby Rosen told The New York Sun that he will alter the plans for an addition to the Upper East Side building.

"We're going to change the way the building looks completely," Mr. Rosen said, after a hearing in which commissioners asked the developer to scale back his plans to build a luxury residential tower above the six-story Parke-Bernet Gallery building. The commission stopped short, however, of voting to totally reject the building proposal.

Mr. Rosen said he and his architect, Lord Norman Foster, might propose a shorter building on a wider footprint atop 980 Madison Avenue, between East 76th and East 77th streets. "You can't just take a tower and cut it down, but we can obviously go back to the drawing board and make the building look different — and that's what we're going to do," the developer said in an interview.

Renderings of the sleek cylindrical structure were made public in October. Since then, the proposal has captured the attention of the neighborhood, where its proponents tout the aesthetics of the design and say it would enliven the neighborhood. Project opponents say a contemporary tower is out of place in a historic district.

Mr. Rosen purchased the Parke-Bernet building two years ago for about $120 million. "As much as I'm unhappy that we can't build that tower, I'm very happy that we can build there — and we will build there," he said.

At yesterday's meeting, which ended without a vote for approval or rejection, some commissioners said they would support a building addition of several stories. The hearing was held at the Surrogate courthouse on Chambers Street.

"The presence of the proposed tower would cause irreparable damage," to the delicate balance of elegant low and midrise buildings along Madison Avenue on the Upper East Side, a commissioner, Stephen Byrns, said.

Another member of the commission, the Rev. Thomas Pike, said as a clergy member, he is an authority on marriage. "This marriage makes me nervous," Rev. Pike said, of the union of low-rise and high-rise. "I just feel it would be more appropriate somewhere else."

But one commissioner, Jan Hird Pokorny, said he would support the plan in its current form. During the hearing, he held up a photograph of the Leaning Tower of Pisa and an adjacent domed church, showing what he said was the successful juxtaposition of disparate architectural designs.

Mr. Rosen said the revised proposal would likely be a contemporary design, but that he would consider using masonry — in addition to glass — and changing the color of the structure from silver to champagne.

Lord Foster's design is an "architectural masterpiece" that belongs on an undeveloped lot where the public could walk up to it and touch it, a commissioner, Joan Gerner, said. Ms. Gerner said she would consider an addition to the existing structure of "two or, maybe three stories," but no more.

Another commissioner, Christopher Moore, said he would support a four- or five-story addition. Mr. Rosen said he thought he should be allowed to build to a height on par with the 14- or 15-story structures in the neighborhood.

A revised proposal must be presented in a public hearing before Community Board 8, before being resubmitted to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, a commission spokeswoman, Elisabeth de Bourbon, said. She said the commission, chaired by Robert Tierney, decided to postpone a vote in order to give the developer time to submit a "substantially altered plan."

A member of a preservation group, Defenders of the Historic Upper East Side, Teri Slater, said she wished the commission yesterday had voted down Mr. Rosen's plan, which she called "extreme for the location."

"We shouldn't even be talking about height or scale," Ms. Slater, who attended the hearing, said. "We should be talking about what a historic district is supposed to be — and what is the contribution of low buildings inside these districts."


© 2007 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.
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Old January 19th, 2007, 12:25 AM   #676
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All for just 7 or 8 floors, it's so dumb IMO, that design was gorgeous, they should understand that exceptions should be made and not let that one building set a precedent if they don't want it to. I hope whatever they come up with is nice.
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Old January 19th, 2007, 01:27 AM   #677
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This thread is great. There are seriously some great building being planned for New York. Loving basically all of them, and its good to see that architects and investors arent afraid to go ultra-modern. Keeps the city on the modern map whilst still retaining its histotical significance. Keep up the info!
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Old January 19th, 2007, 03:06 AM   #678
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564-foot-high condo tower planned by Mt. Sinai Hospital


18-JAN-07

Plans have been filed with the city by Skidmore Owings & Merrill on behalf of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine for a 564-foot-high, 39-story residential condominium building at 4 East 102nd Street.

The building would be the tallest building in Manhattan north of the hospital's huge 26-story, 434-foot-high Annenberg Building in the center of the hospital's multi-block complex a couple of blocks to the south that was designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1976. In their great book, "The A.I.A. Guide to New York City, Fourth Edition" (Three River Press, 2000), Elliot Willensky and Norval White described the Annenberg Building at "a great rusty, cadaverous, blockbuster of a building, an incursive hulk that dominates the skyline of East Harlem (to its east)."

The new building will extend through the block to 101st Street where it faces the north side of the second phase of the hospital's Guggenheim Pavilion, an angled, white brick structure with tall atriums designed in 1991 by I. M. Pei of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

The documents on file with the city indicate that the building would have two levels of underground parking, and "mechanical equipment on floors 2 though 4, five apartments on the 5th, 6th and 7th floors, "mechanical equipment" on the eighth floor and four apartments on floors 9 through 38, three apartments on floors 29 through 35, four apartments on floors 36 through 38 and mechanical equipment on the 39th floor and the roof.

In response to a query from CityRealty.com, the hospital sent a statement by e-mail drafted in October about its plans to build "an important new addition to its campus between 101st and 102nd streets on the west side of Madison Avenue."

"The new building, the Center for Science and Medicine, will be an approximately 410,000 square foot state of the art medical science and research facility designed to compliment and meet the urgent expansion needs of Mount Sinai's existing world class research and clinical programs. It will be equivalent in height (180 feet) to the existing Guggenheim Pavilion in the block immediately to the south. Construction of the new Center is planned to begin in 2008 and to be completed in 2011."

"In addition," the statement continued, "Mount Sinai is also totally reconstructing one of its existing buildings (120 feet in height) located at 5 East 102nd, between Madison and Fifth Avenue to consolidate and modernize its ambulatory and neighborhood health care programs....This project will begin construction in the fall of 2006."

"In the absence of federal, state or city funding to assist in defraying the $800+ million cost of these new facilities," the statement continued, "Mount Sinai plans to sell residential air rights it owns which would allow construction of a privately developed and owned high-rise residential apartment building located between Madison and Fifth Avenues, 101st and 102nd Streets in the mid block. No developer-purchaser for the air rights has been selected at this time. In addition to the improved community health care services described above, these projects will include significant cancer research and treatment programs, benefiting the surrounding community which has rates of death from cancer 30% higher than the average in New York City. Further, construction and operation of these two projects will provide concrete economic benefits to the community, including construction-period and permanent employment opportunities, new research grants, and new City property taxes (for the residences)....Mount Sinai's plans for the new research and ambulatory care facilities have already been the subject of extensive discussion with the City, local elected officials and neighborhood, civic and community organizations....construction of the new Center for Science and Medicine will require approval of the City's Board of Standards and Appeals and related environmental analyses."


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Old January 19th, 2007, 03:07 AM   #679
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I guess it will be taller and next to that huge black box looming over Central Park in the distance...

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Old January 19th, 2007, 05:42 PM   #680
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I Think it's more to the left on that picture.
But it will sure be taller than the black box.

BTW : Krull: Many Thanks for the news in this thread. Allways read it with much pleasure.
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