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Old February 28th, 2007, 02:52 AM   #761
Taylorhoge
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Wow they havent stared that thing ugh it takes so long for something to get approved in the city its all politics,politics upstate city just build the freedom tower and Caltaveras towere already.
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Old February 28th, 2007, 03:24 AM   #762
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^They haven't even sold one unit, so how can they start construction?
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Old February 28th, 2007, 09:38 AM   #763
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TalB I respect your view and all the information you bring to the forum. It is good we have people to buck the status quo in terms of development. However New York does have to compete with other cities like Dubai and Shanghai. Not in tangible terms like number of skyscrapers or architectural taste, but in keeping the City competitive in order to attract businesses, residents and tourists. Neighborhoods should keep their identities, but not to the point of choking the city of growth.

great news about the south street seaport
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Old February 28th, 2007, 01:56 PM   #764
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NU YAWK CITY....JUKEBOX CITY

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Old February 28th, 2007, 10:34 PM   #765
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http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/...p-422691c.html
Beacon of hope for S.I.

Lighthouse deal will create jobs, revenue boon

BY LAURA ALBANESE
DAILY NEWS WRITER

The city inked a deal to develop Staten Island's Lighthouse Harbor site in a move that is expected to create 250 new full-time jobs and $95 million in revenue for city coffers in the next 25 years, officials said yesterday.

Under a deal with developer Triangle Equities, the 3-acre site next to the St. George ferry terminal is slated for a major makeover that also will create 650 construction jobs, said Janel Patterson, a spokeswoman for the city Economic Development Corp.

In addition to renovating three of the historic buildings, the $105 million plan calls for two new apartment buildings with 200 units along with 45,000 square feet of retail space.

It also will mean big gains for Staten Island, Borough President James Molinaro said, creating a hub near the ferry terminal and a new home for the National Lighthouse Museum.

The museum had been in limbo since it decided to come to the borough in 1998. Molinaro was a big supporter, anteing up $1.2 million. And the city has invested $6.5 million to stabilize the two buildings it will call home.

The city will maintain ownership of those buildings and lease them out to the museum, Patterson said.

The deal with Triangle Equities is still in its planning stages, and negotiations are in the works regarding a final price for the property, she added.

No date has been set for when construction will begin.

It's "an important and historically significant site," EDC President Robert Leiber said in a statement, calling the deal a "major milestone."

It also could be a big economic boost, Molinaro said, adding that the effect of new restaurants and businesses could be "tremendous."

"Staten Island is growing up," he said.

Elysa Goldman, director of development for Triangle, called Lighthouse Harbor its "premiere project."

"It's going to create a significant value for the area," she said.

Last year, Triangle Equities began construction on another city property - a 250,000-square-foot Target shopping center in Midwood.

Originally published on February 28, 2007
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 09:01 PM   #766
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Yet another new 8th Ave tower...

(NY Post)

ODD COUPLE PLANS A WINNER ON EIGHTH



By STEVE CUOZZO
March 2, 2007

An odd-couple partnership is putting together a huge Eighth Avenue building site that can support a new office tower of up to 1 million square feet, The Post has learned.

In a rare joint venture, privately held Related, headed by Stephen Ross, and publicly traded Boston Properties, led by Mort Zuckerman, have teamed up to buy half of the east blockfront between 45th and 46th streets plus several buildings on both side streets.

The deals involve a half- dozen different sellers and are valued at a total $350 million. The deals are all in contract, but will not close until later this year.

Related and Boston are buying several small vacant tenements, a small hotel, a parking lot, an 8-story garage, and "floating" air rights harvested from other sites within the city's theater subdistrict.

The site's boundaries extend to the western wall of the Imperial Theater on 46th Street and of the Music Box on West 45th.

The fact that Related and Boston have formed a single entity to buy the 30,000 square-foot site does not necessarily mean they will stick with plans for an office tower. "Manhattan is very unpredictable, and nothing is certain," an insider cautioned.

Nor does it mean Related and Boston will stop at the deals now on the table. Sources said they still covet five small buildings at the avenue block's south end.

Adding them would enable the developers to create an uninterrupted street wall the full length of the block.

The negotiations, conducted in secret for three years, reflect the frenzy for land on Eighth Avenue - the last frontier in central Midtown for large-scale development.

Reps for both Related and Boston declined to comment. Officials at Community Board 5, which vetted the air rights transfers, could not be reached.

Sources buzzed that Grubb & Ellis' Vincent Carrega was representing the sellers and had "engi neered" the multiple and complicated transactions, but he could not be reached yesterday.

Times Square Alli ance President Tim Tompkins said, "a de velopment of this signif icance will be another crucial building block in the redefinition of Eighth Avenue from neglected little brother to an adult that's finally come into its own."

Once grungy Eighth Avenue is in dramatic transformation. The Mid town stretch boasts the New York Times head quarters at 40th Street, Worldwide Plaza at 49th Street and the Hearst tower at 57th Street.

SJP Properties will break ground this summer on 11 Times Square, an office tower between 41st and 42nd streets. Boston Prop erties is putting the finish ing touches on an assem blage between 54th and 55th streets.

Investor-developers including Steven Witkoff have numerous development sites as well.



Downtown Brooklyn Is Booming

By MICHAEL STOLER
March 1, 2007

Everyone loves Brooklyn, and that's especially true of its president, Marty Markowitz, the borough's biggest promoter, salesman, and cheerleader. "My agenda as borough president is to focus on one thing: making Brooklyn a better place to live now, and for future generations," he said. "Remember, if it's good for Brooklyn residents and businesses, it's good for New York City."

Downtown Brooklyn is at the forefront of the dramatic changes that have been taking place across the borough's landscape. More than 5,000 condominium units, 2,000 hotel rooms, and hundreds of thousand of square feet of retail and office space are in the development pipeline. They will transform the look and feel of the neighborhood.

Big development deals are a significant part of the action. Last Thursday, a joint venture of Acadia Realty Trust, P/A Associates, AvalonBay Communities, and MacFarlane Partners agreed to purchase the lease on the Gallery at Fulton Street, its attached parking lot, and the former Albee Square Mall from Thor Equities for about $125 million. The land under the mall and the parking lot are owned by New York City.

The new owners plan to demolish the facility and construct a 1.6 million-square-foot mixed-use complex called the Center at Albee Square which will have retail, office, and residential rental units. Arcadia and P/A Associates will develop 475,000 square feet of retail space that may include a major discount department store. AvalonBay Communities and MacFarlane Partners will build 1,000 rental apartments, 20% of them for tenants of moderate incomes. The two joint ventures would build and construct a total of more than 125,000 square feet of office space. The new owners will also receive about $1.8 million in city tax subsidies through sales tax exemptions and a mortgage tax waiver.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 09:02 PM   #767
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8TH AVENUE IS BOOMING.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 09:07 PM   #768
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New Life For Plan To Build New Station In NYC


By Jay DeDapper


You'll recall the long-talked-about Moynihan Station project would use most of the Farley Post Office across 8th Avenue from Penn Station as a new railroad station primarily for New Jersey Transit (Amtrak pulled out years ago because Congress never gives them any money).


But the project as put together by Governor Pataki was axed late last year by Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver who said there was no reason to go forward right then when two of the biggest developers in the city were discussing the idea of tearing down Madison Square Garden and redoing the entire area with new office and residential towers, a new Penn Station, a new Farley Station, and a new Madison Square Garden on 9th Avenue.

That plan is still being discussed but today the state (through the Empire State Development Corp) said it will go ahead with the purchase of the Farley Building from the United States Postal Service regardless. The ESDC is hoping to put the purchase proposal in front of the Public Authorities Control Board (where Silver vetoed the Pataki plan) next month.

In the meantime NewsChannel 4 has learned that a new much grander development proposal involving Vornado and Related Companies (two of the city's biggest developers) is moving ahead in negotiations with ESDC and is likely to be presented publicly in April or May.

Sources tell NewsChannel 4 that the Spitzer Administration believes it can make a much better deal with much greater impact for the city than the one Pataki had put together just for Moynihan Station.
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Old March 2nd, 2007, 11:31 PM   #769
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1mio sqft is a lot, think the new tower will have at least 60F
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 05:52 AM   #770
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Stephen Ross is the same guy who did the Time Warner Center. I'm excited about this project. I love the progress 8th Ave. is making.
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 06:20 AM   #771
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1mio sqft is a lot, think the new tower will have at least 60F
Thats very opimistic. Considering this lot if the 5 corner buildings are acquired id 200 by 180 feet which comes out to 36000 sq feet, I think realistically we will be seeing about 45-50 floors, depending on the setbacks.
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 06:43 AM   #772
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http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_19...persfrist.html
Volume 19 Issue 42 | March 2 - 8, 2007

Seaport developer’s first idea: Move the mall, build a tower

By Skye H. McFarlane


General Growth is considering knocking down Pier 17 to create better river views while moving the stores to a new tower to be built near the current location of the Tin Building, which could be relocated under the plan.

More than 150 anxious onlookers packed the Southbridge Towers community room Monday night, straining to see General Growth Properties’ long-awaited plan to redevelop Pier 17 and the South Street Seaport.

To the relief of some and the disappointment of others, General Growth did not present a concrete development plan, but instead put forward a number of goals for the project along with several possibilities for achieving those aims. One of those possibilities, however — a slender, 360-foot mixed-use tower — elicited gasps from the crowd.

“You made a presentation with no details and we all know that the devil is in the details,” Gold St. resident Carl Litt told the team of developers. “But if you are looking for direction, it’s: ‘Keep the height low.’”

The potential tower is just one possible configuration for building out the maximum square footage allowed in the area of the Seaport east of South St., including Pier 17 (where the height limit is 40 feet) and the adjacent platform that holds the historic Tin Building (where zoning allows a 360-foot structure). Due to zoning and practical construction concerns, any building more than 40 feet tall would have to be built on the platform. Diagrams at the meeting placed the new building, whatever its size and shape, just south of the Tin Building’s current location.

Because there is a limit on the square footage, a short building on the site could be wide and bulky, while a tower would have to be narrow. General Growth therefore presented the building as an opportunity to forge a compromise with community interests. The taller and thinner the building is, the more open space would be created on the site — space that the developers would convert into park, playground or other public uses.

Under this tradeoff scenario, the developers suggested that they could convert Pier 17 and/or part of the platform into open space and move retail shops into the lower floors of the new building. SHoP Architects, which is also designing the East River waterfront for the city, would blend the public space at Pier 17 into the larger plan for the waterfront greenway.

While East Side residents applauded the idea of public space on the site, many balked at the notion of adding another residential building to a neighborhood whose schools, parks and services are already struggling to catch up with the population growth. Others pointed out that an especially tall building might not be deemed appropriate by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which will have to evaluate whatever is built on the Seaport Historic District site.

Aside from the tower idea, many community members agreed with the developers’ basic goals to make the Seaport safer for pedestrians, more shopper-friendly to neighborhood residents and more connected to the water that surrounds it. General Growth gained control of the Seaport Marketplace when it acquired the Rouse Company in 2004. The neighborhood has been waiting ever since to hear what the developers, best known for operating malls around the country, plan to do with the space.

Saying that the Pier 17 mall’s original builders had “turned their back on the neighborhood” and “sacrificed Beekman St.” as a back alley for loading docks, Gregg Pasquarelli of SHoP elaborated on the developers’ desire to narrow the width of South St., bring in a variety of stores and services, and open up sightlines to the water and the Brooklyn Bridge. Those sightlines along Fulton and Beekman Sts. could potentially be achieved by razing the current 1983 mall building and moving the Tin Building either a few feet to the south or out to the end of the pier. The group would also restore the Tin Building, which was used by Fulton Fish Market mongers, and repair the ancient pier substructure below it.

“It should be a place that first and foremost is about serving New York and the region, but we’ll let the tourists come, too,” said John Alschuler, president of HR&A, the project’s consulting firm.

John Fratta, president of Southbridge Towers’s board of directors and chairperson of Community Board 1’s Seaport Committee, said he believed the community could find common ground with General Growth and work out a development proposal that would be both profitable for the developers and beneficial to the community. “I was very happy to hear someone finally admitting that the South Street Seaport as it is does not meet the needs of the community,” Fratta said.

Several tenants of the mall, however, expressed worries that their leases would be broken, unfairly forcing them out of Pier 17 to make room for the new development. Michael McNaughton, a vice president at General Growth, responded tersely, saying that his company appreciates and supports the business of the mall tenants and that “diagrams of tearing down the pier are conceptual only.”

The exchange prompted another audience member to chide General Growth for pitting residents against small business owners in a community that has already endured the trauma of 9/11. The comment drew rousing applause, as did any comment calling for more neighborhood amenities like parks, schools or athletic fields.

A few speakers also expressed disappointment that General Growth did not present more detailed plans for the Seaport Museum. The museum is within the geographic scope of the redevelopment project, but is part of a separate lease with the city. Many locals would like to see the museum expanded and enhanced, but General Growth did not address the matter except to say that the company had solicited the popular “Bodies” exhibit, as well as entertainment programs that had benefited the Seaport as a whole.

Because Monday’s meeting was just the beginning of what General Growth said would be a long dialogue with the community, there were no hard figures discussed regarding how much the project would cost or how long it would take to build. The developers did say that they expected the city to foot some of the bill for repairing the substructure beneath the Tin Building, since the city owns the land.

Pasquarelli added that the team is still studying the economic feasibility of various redevelopment configurations. Because parts of the platform and pier sit 150 feet above bedrock, building on the platform will likely be complicated and pricey. Whenever a more definite plan emerges, though, Pasquarelli said that SHoP could give the community a presentation on the entire waterfront, including both Pier 17 and the city’s East River projects.

“It’s good for the city and we’d absolutely be happy to do that. But now we’re really trying to figure them both out,” Pasquarelli said of the adjacent projects. “The community has to figure out what the tradeoff is [between building size and public amenities]. We want to do the best possible project for our clients and the community.”

Overall, many of those who attended the meeting — including John Randolph of Sciame Development, the other major developer in the Seaport — said that they were encouraged by General Growth’s willingness to solicit opinions from the community. Hopefully, they said, the open process will continue.

“All of us came to the meeting expecting to get a plan from General Growth,” said Julie Nadel, chairperson of C.B. 1’s Waterfront Committee. “Instead of hearing from them, they heard from us — and that’s alright.”

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Old March 3rd, 2007, 06:45 AM   #773
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/04/re...ate&oref=login
Female Bonding on Bond Street

By JEFF VANDAM
Published: March 4, 2007


Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times, left; rendering by XXXX, right

MUTUAL INSPIRATION SOCIETY Romy Goldman, left, is a developer of 48 Bond Street, one of three new buildings on the block. It was designed by Deborah Berke’s architectural firm.


FOR the moment, the cobblestone block of Bond Street between Lafayette Street and the Bowery represents nothing so much as a boisterous construction zone. Workers haul materials to and fro, through sooty remnants of snow, for three large properties under construction.

The new glass-and-steel condominium from Ian Schrager, 40 Bond, is the farthest along, and another condo project, 25 Bond, is encased in white tarp across the street.

Then, a few doors down from the Schrager creation, past tenements and brick manufacturing lofts, there is 48 Bond, a condominium building where construction has now reached to the second floor. There will eventually be 11 stories — enough for 14 two-bedroom apartments. Prices begin at $2 million.

Though the development will, like its new neighbors, use the address as its title, in one respect this residential project differs from many others in New York: both the architect and a lead developer are women.

“It’s a delight,” said Deborah Berke, a professor at the Yale School of Architecture whose firm, Deborah Berke & Partners Architects, designed 48 Bond. She was speaking of her collaboration with Romy Goldman, whose Gold Development is working on the property along with Donald Capoccia.

“There can be light female moments woven into the overall serious business at hand,” Ms. Berke said. “We can share a lot.”

Had she heard of other projects on which two women were taking lead roles? She thought for a moment. “I’m racking my brains,” she said. “Nothing springs to mind.”

The building, scheduled for completion in late fall, will have a 60-foot lap pool, where music piped in from a central system will be accessible underwater, via swimmers’ MP3 players.

In addition, Ms. Berke said, older loft buildings around the downtown area inspired her to give each unit two large square windows on the building’s face.

Every apartment will have 10-foot ceilings, walnut floors and expensive appliances, including washers and dryers. Square footage will range from 1,550 to 3,661 square feet.

Sales began three weeks ago, and so far, Ms. Goldman said, six units are in contract. Interested shoppers have included young couples, a few empty nesters and single workers from the financial arena.

Expressing pride in the roles of women as creators of 48 Bond, she reflected that Bond Street would be something of a different animal when it and the other two projects were completed.

“This is going to be quite a block,” she said.
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Old March 4th, 2007, 06:05 AM   #774
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I'm getting excited. Pretty damn soon, hopefully, we'll be getting a whole new slew of 1,000'+ers. There are so many projects cureently that have so much potential. It's only a matter of time before we start getting all the good stuff. I have a great feeling. (;
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Old March 4th, 2007, 01:19 PM   #775
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yes, me too
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Old March 6th, 2007, 12:11 AM   #776
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http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/...p-423940c.html
Sacrificing sanctuary for condos

$12M plans to raze 108-yr.-old church

BY JOTHAM SEDERSTROM
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

One of Brooklyn's oldest congregations is nearing a $12 million deal on its 108-year-old church, clearing the way to raze the sanctuary and replace it with condos.

The Bay Ridge United Methodist Church, which has invested thousands of dollars in preserving the church's dazzling but deteriorating limestone facade, is expected to be razed and replaced with a smaller church and big apartments.

"Even if we had the money we shouldn't be putting it all into repairs," said the Rev. Robert Emerick. "That's not what Jesus had in mind."

The sale would fund worthy causes such as helping the homeless, Emerick noted.

Church officials are nearing a deal with a developer despite a push by area preservationists to save the structure, a source familiar with the property said.

If a sale is finalized, the 650-seat "green church," as it is known locally, would be torn down and replaced with a significantly smaller 150-seat church.

A second building on the lot - which currently houses a preschool - would also likely be torn down, Emerick said.

An apartment building would also be built on the 24,015-square-foot lot, though it was unclear how tall that building would rise or how costly units would be.

A spokeswoman for Massey Knakal, the real estate group marketing the property, said a church would remain on the site in some capacity, but declined to say if the property had been sold.

"Massey Knakal continues to explore all options for the church," said spokeswoman Kari Neering. "It has a 100-year existence in the community and is not looking to leave. In fact, they're willing to take less from the right buyer."

State Sen. Martin Golden (R-Bay Ridge), who met with Emerick to discuss the church's future, believes senior housing or low-income housing should be built on the site.

"Unfortunately, the handwriting is on the wall," said Golden. "Brooklyn used to be the borough of churches and bars, but the bars are down and now the churches are starting to go down, too."

Founded in 1830, the United Methodist congregation moved three times before building its current church on Ovington Ave. in 1899, Emerick said.

Known for its exquisite four-face clock tower, the church's green facade has been crumbling for decades as wind and rain continue to erode the original limestone structure.

Originally published on March 5, 2007
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Old March 7th, 2007, 12:50 AM   #777
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/03062007...eve_cuozzo.htm
54TH STREET DEAL INKED

ZUCKERMAN, GLADSTONE PAY $160M FOR OLD HEARST SITES

March 6, 2007 -- THE humongous, Boston Properties-Madison Equities assemblage on Eighth Avenue is a done deal at last - one of a trio of development sites on the avenue that could produce nearly 3 million square feet of new office space by 2010.

The companies led by Mort Zuckerman and Robert Gladstone paid $160 million for a bunch of vacant buildings and a former parking lot on the avenue's east side between 54th and 55th streets, according to city records.

The deal came on the heels of the recent purchase by the same joint venture, first reported here, of the adjacent state office building at 247-259 W. 54th St. for $38.75 million.

The combined parcels are big enough to support an office tower of around 850,000 square feet.

The footprint encompasses the whole east blockfront and extends east along both side streets - up to and including the former Hearst office building on West 55th Street, and the old state Labor Dept. building on West 54th.

Many of the properties were previously owned by Hearst, which was represented by CB Richard Ellis's Darcy Stacom and William Shanahan.

Over time, Shanahan said, Hearst - now happily installed in its eye-popping new headquarters a few blocks north - made several small, strategic acquisitions between 54th and 55th to enhance the parcel's value and to block any competing assemblage. "It was a real game of Monopoly," he said.

Meanwhile, as we reported last Friday, Boston is also in a joint venture with Related on another jumbo site suitable for an office tower on the east side of Eighth between 45th and 46th streets. We said the land extends to the wall of the Imperial Theater on 46th Street.

We should have said almost. Christian Ponsolle, owner of tiny 252 W. 46th next door to the Imperial, called to say he hasn't sold his property or air rights. The four-story building with a mere 161/2 feet of sidewalk frontage is home to time-warp French bistro Pergola des Artistes.

The two assemblages raise the question: how many new office buildings can once-lowly Eighth Avenue take?

In addition to Boston's sites, SJP Properties will break ground this summer on 11 Times Square, a 1.1 million square-foot office tower at 42nd Street just north of the Times headquarters.

Cushman & Wakefield Chief Executive Bruce Mosler said, "I'm pretty confident when you look at the demand in the office sector, which is very different than residential - we're under-supplied with offices.

"The Manhattan market is healthy. We need some new supply right now."

Mosler wouldn't speculate on whether the projects would go forward without tenants. But he noted, "We're seeing a flight to quality" - a phenomenon that has seen space move quickly at the newest and most expensive new projects, such as the Times tower.
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Old March 7th, 2007, 02:17 AM   #778
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TalB View Post
http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/...p-423940c.html
Sacrificing sanctuary for condos

$12M plans to raze 108-yr.-old church

BY JOTHAM SEDERSTROM
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

One of Brooklyn's oldest congregations is nearing a $12 million deal on its 108-year-old church, clearing the way to raze the sanctuary and replace it with condos.

The Bay Ridge United Methodist Church, which has invested thousands of dollars in preserving the church's dazzling but deteriorating limestone facade, is expected to be razed and replaced with a smaller church and big apartments.

"Even if we had the money we shouldn't be putting it all into repairs," said the Rev. Robert Emerick. "That's not what Jesus had in mind."

The sale would fund worthy causes such as helping the homeless, Emerick noted.

Church officials are nearing a deal with a developer despite a push by area preservationists to save the structure, a source familiar with the property said.

If a sale is finalized, the 650-seat "green church," as it is known locally, would be torn down and replaced with a significantly smaller 150-seat church.

A second building on the lot - which currently houses a preschool - would also likely be torn down, Emerick said.

An apartment building would also be built on the 24,015-square-foot lot, though it was unclear how tall that building would rise or how costly units would be.

A spokeswoman for Massey Knakal, the real estate group marketing the property, said a church would remain on the site in some capacity, but declined to say if the property had been sold.

"Massey Knakal continues to explore all options for the church," said spokeswoman Kari Neering. "It has a 100-year existence in the community and is not looking to leave. In fact, they're willing to take less from the right buyer."

State Sen. Martin Golden (R-Bay Ridge), who met with Emerick to discuss the church's future, believes senior housing or low-income housing should be built on the site.

"Unfortunately, the handwriting is on the wall," said Golden. "Brooklyn used to be the borough of churches and bars, but the bars are down and now the churches are starting to go down, too."

Founded in 1830, the United Methodist congregation moved three times before building its current church on Ovington Ave. in 1899, Emerick said.

Known for its exquisite four-face clock tower, the church's green facade has been crumbling for decades as wind and rain continue to erode the original limestone structure.

Originally published on March 5, 2007

This is the church facing demolition:

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Old March 7th, 2007, 03:21 AM   #779
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I cant wait to visit NewYork for my first time in April :P
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Old March 8th, 2007, 05:08 AM   #780
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8th Avenue is booming
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