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Old March 9th, 2007, 01:57 AM   #781
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/04/ny...ml?ref=thecity
For a Brownstone Lot, Tall Dreams and Troubled Neighbors

By ALEX MINDLIN
Published: March 4, 2007


Renderings by Barry Rice Architects
Where a brownstone stands, plans call for a skinny 17-story tower of glass and brick.


EVERYONE seemed to have come out ahead. In 1999, shaking off its last few crumbs of foreclosed real estate, the city sold a decrepit, century-old brownstone at 330 West 86th Street, flanked by 15-story towers.

Under a special provision of state law designed to encourage the rehabilitation of “slum or blighted” dwellings, the city sold the brownstone to some of its half-dozen or so tenants for the apparently modest price of $340,000, on the condition that they clear up its building code violations. According to city lawyers and local officials, the building’s new owners were also supposed to preserve the structure.

“We did it to prevent development,” said former City Councilwoman Ronnie Eldridge, who helped facilitate the transaction. “It was to be housing for the people who had been living there for a long time. We felt that they were really committed, and that they were going to take care of the building.”

So much for intentions. In March 2001, less than two years after buying the 20-foot-wide building, the residents sold it for $2.25 million to a company called Darkhorse Development, which plans a 17-story glass-and-brick residential building on the site.

Darkhorse’s redevelopment plans have sparked a six-year legal fight involving the city, Darkhorse, and the building’s next-door neighbors. The suit was filed in 2000 by residents of one of the 15-story neighbors, who were alarmed at the prospect of having their windows blocked.

In documents filed in January with the State Court of Appeals, city lawyers described the new owners’ plans as an “abuse of the public trust” and argued that the city would have sold the building for much more if the plan had been to redevelop the lot. A decision is expected this month.

But in an interview the other day, Robert Ricciardelli, one of Darkhorse’s owners, argued that when selling the building the city had not intended that it be preserved, and that it would never have brought more than $340,000 at auction, because most or all of the apartments were rent-stabilized.

Noting the presence of taller buildings on either side of the brownstone, Mr. Ricciardelli said: “We’re not doing anything crazy. We have plans to basically fill in the skyline on that lot.”

Some people, he said, would prefer to keep the neighborhood the same. “But this is New York City,” he added. “Things change.”
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Old March 9th, 2007, 02:02 AM   #782
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/07/nyregion/07tower.html
Historical Society Loses Round in Fight to Renovate a Landmark

By GLENN COLLINS
Published: March 7, 2007
In a stormy two-hour meeting before 200 neighborhood residents last night, the New-York Historical Society was rebuffed by Community Board 7 in Manhattan, which resoundingly opposed the group’s proposal to renovate the exterior of its landmark building at 170 Central Park West.

The board voted 40 to 2 against a plan that would replace the society’s eight-foot-wide doorway, built in 1908, with a 40-foot glass entryway and granite portico at the main entrance between West 76th and 77th Streets.

Because the board is an advisory body, its decision does not block the renovation. But as a signal of strong community opposition, the vote could carry weight with the New York City Planning Commission and the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which is likely to hold a hearing on the plan this month. Both groups have veto power over the project.

Louise Mirrer, the historical society’s president, said the community board inappropriately linked the renovation plan to the construction of a 23-story luxury residential tower that the society has proposed as an addition to its four-story building.

“I’m disappointed,” Dr. Mirrer said, adding that the community board’s vote, if used as a precedent, “would prevent any landmark anywhere from ever doing anything new.”

Kate Wood, executive director of Landmark West, an Upper West Side preservation group, said that the historical society’s project “deserves to be stopped in its tracks.” She described it as “a Trojan horse” for the luxury tower and added, “Please don’t open the gate.”

Scott M. Stringer, the Manhattan borough president, said he could not take a position for or against the plan. “But we should call it what it is,” he said. “It’s going to be a large tower. It’s not about phase one tonight — it’s about what comes after the facade.”

Dr. Mirrer argued that the renovation is essential to make the building more inviting and its exhibitions more accessible, and, she added, that it might be years before a tower could be approved. But Peter M. Wright, co-chairman of the Park West 77th Street Block Association, termed the design “an ill-conceived facade.” The tower, he said, would intrude upon the Central Park skyline and cast a shadow on the park itself.

“I’m pleased,” Mr. Wright said of the vote, adding that it was a step toward defeating the tower plan.

For weeks, preservation groups that oppose the renovation had been e-mailing their members to attend the meeting, held in an auditorium at the American Bible Society at West 61st Street and Broadway. The society, meanwhile, had been exhorting its members to lobby elected city officials to support the plan.

The debate — which followed an hour of discussion on other projects — was punctuated with catcalls and applause. The society’s plan proposes changes not only to the Central Park West entrance, it also would de-emphasize the West 77th Street entrance and reconfigure existing windows there for the construction of a cafe.

The opposition of the community board “bears the hallmark of a group that has campaigned against the historical society,” Dr. Mirrer said. “Of course we will press on.”
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Old March 9th, 2007, 06:34 AM   #783
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That church should be preserved. If only there was more money devoted to things like this.
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Old March 12th, 2007, 02:39 AM   #784
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Any new proposes or rumors about building in new york.
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Old March 12th, 2007, 08:51 AM   #785
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?
this whole forum?
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Old March 12th, 2007, 08:24 PM   #786
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no, new rumors of supertowers or something.
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Old March 13th, 2007, 03:21 AM   #787
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TowerPower View Post
That church should be preserved. If only there was more money devoted to things like this.
That church is way too beatiful to demolish, and we don't see a lot of stone churches being built these days in cities.
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Old March 13th, 2007, 03:22 AM   #788
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Very True..maybe even name it a landmark
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Old March 14th, 2007, 01:16 AM   #789
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/11/re...ate&oref=login
Harlem’s Newest Beacon

By JOSH BARBANEL
Published: March 11, 2007


Construction has begun on the 30-story Fifth on Park, shown in a rendering at left, which will be one of the tallest buildings in Harlem.


353 Central Park West

GENTRIFICATION in Harlem has taken many forms, as the neighborhood has revived and celebrated its past, and last week it reached a new milestone: its first Upper East Side-style high-rise condominium tower, to rise 30 stories above the low-rise brownstones for which the nearby Mount Morris Park Historic District is known.

The site is now a large hole in the ground. But the glass-and-brick tower will soon rise 310 feet on the edge of central Harlem, with 147 condos, 47 rental apartments, a 55-foot lap pool and a four-story church sanctuary with seating for more than 1,800 worshipers — and a very tall reminder that Harlem is becoming more like the rest of Manhattan.

The building, at Fifth Avenue and East 120th Street, facing the 20-acre Marcus Garvey Park, is to be known as Fifth on Park.

It has been greeted with some consternation and surprise by local preservationists, because it was built “as of right” with no required public review. But the developers say it will be a beacon to bring back the black middle class to the cultural heart of black New York.

Joseph Holland, a former state housing commissioner who is developing the site with a partner, Lew Futterman, said he wanted to make a statement with the design of the building, about the resurgence of Harlem and its welcome to middle-class black New Yorkers, after its decades of decline. “I believe it is important for middle-class blacks to take a stake in the community,” he said.

At a reception last week at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, where details of the project were unveiled, Mr. Holland said, he pressed black professionals to consider Harlem and offered his guests a 5 percent rebate if they bought before the formal marketing campaign begins in April.

The building will tower over most of central Harlem, including the 19-story Harlem State Office Building on West 125th Street, and will be by far the tallest unsubsidized building in the area. It will be rivaled in height by only a handful of city housing projects and state-subsidized projects in Harlem and East Harlem.

“The scale of such a thing is absolutely appalling,” said Michael Henry Adams, an architectural historian and co-author of “Harlem: Lost and Found” (Monacelli, 2001). “The irony is that what makes Harlem attractive to so many people is that unlike most other parts of the city you can look up and see the sky.” To reach 30 stories, the developers bought development rights to a full square block of land owned by the church next door, the Bethel Gospel Assembly Church. That gave the developers the right to build a far taller building than would otherwise have been allowed.

In 1983, the church, in what must be considered in retrospect a brilliant real estate move, bought the block between Fifth and Madison Avenues and extending down to 119th Street, including a fairly modern surplus school building, for only $300,000, and conducted services in the school auditorium.

The church had once housed the James Fenimore Cooper Junior High School, and the building is still adorned with a large relief sculpture of Cooper and has the Board of Education seal and the city and state seals carved into the green marble entrance. The building was opened in 1936 at a cost of $12 million (about 40 times what the church paid for it) but was closed in the 1970s.

Over the last few years, the church, at the urging of its pastor, Carlton T. Brown, decided to raise money for a new sanctuary and for the church’s missions abroad, by selling what had been the school’s playground to the developers along with all of the air rights to the entire lot, in exchange for $12 million, according to city records, and space for the auditorium and 47 rental units, which would provide income for the church.

Vincent Williams, a church trustee who heads the building committee, said that the church was exploring the option of offering a mix of market rate and affordable rental units but that a final decision had not been reached.

THE zoning in the area was created to encourage medium-density construction, similar to that used in a number of recent condo developments, including the Lenox, a 12-story building put up by Mr. Holland and Mr. Futterman on Lenox Avenue and 129th Street.

But the code allows higher density for churches and doctors’ offices, and makes an exception to encourage tall towers on large plots with open space. The developers were also able to use the open space around the church in their calculations of open space.

The developers said they planned to offer apartments for about two-thirds the going rate in the rest of Manhattan, with many of the same amenities, including valet services, communal roof terraces and high ceilings. Prices range from $346,000 for smaller studios to $2.67 million for three-bedroom duplexes with terraces. (The developers list the top story at 28, but their construction documents show 30 stories, including some space for mechanical systems atop the building.)

There is some evidence, brokers say, that new condominium construction raises market values in older condominiums, even where the neighbors rally to try to stop a project.

But in the new project’s surrounding neighborhood, feelings are frayed. Valerie Jo Bradley, a longtime resident who is active in the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, said she was worried that the building would block the southern exposure of the park and cast long shadows over basketball courts and a playground. “There is nothing that tall on Fifth Avenue,” she said.

Buying the Next-Best Thing

ONE interesting quirk of the residential real estate construction boom may be the fact that architects, who often portray themselves as creative but underpaid artists, have begun competing with bankers, lawyers, hedge-fund executives and real estate developers for apartments on Fifth Avenue and Central Park West.

City records show that last month, Ismael Leyva, the Mexican-born architect who designed the residential interiors at the Time Warner Center, and worked on more than a dozen other major residential projects over the last few years, paid $5.6 million for a full-floor condominium on the 15th floor of 353 Central Park West at West 95th Street. The unit has sweeping park views from its floor-to-ceiling windows.

Mr. Leyva said he didn’t consider buying at the Time Warner Center, because “I couldn’t afford it then and I can’t afford it now.”

But mimicking his sleek modern interiors at Time Warner, Mr. Leyva is planning to update his new apartment to make it less traditional. The apartment has three bedrooms, a living room, dining room and library, a private entrance to the elevator, and four bathrooms, according to the floor plan. It totals 2,733 square feet.

Walls are being removed, and the kitchen is being opened up to create a more loftlike feel, he said. “It is a good 12-year-old building,” he said. “I wanted to do some changes to fit my taste.”

Mr. Leyva bought the apartment from its first owner, Nadine Gill, the records show. Ms. Gill bought it for $1.8 million in 1997, when at the age of 64 she decided to downsize from a 3,500-square-foot, nine-room apartment in the Eldorado, a prewar building at 90th Street and Central Park West.

Buying in a postwar condominium has its advantages, too. While many high-end prewar co-ops require all-cash deals, Mr. Leyva, the architect, was able to buy with a $3.6 million mortgage, according to city records.
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Old March 14th, 2007, 10:44 PM   #790
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http://www.nydailynews.com/boroughs/...r_uptown_.html
A high-rise future eyed for uptown

Sherman Creek strip across from Fordham Road may get makeover

BY NADIA ZONIS
DAILY NEWS WRITER

Sunday, March 11th 2007, 7:08 PM

A bleak strip of land in upper Manhattan along the Harlem River, just across from Fordham Road in the Bronx, could soon undergo major rezoning to make way for high-rise apartment buildings.

The area, known as Sherman Creek, is now occupied by discount grocery stores and a Pathmark supermarket that draw shoppers from the Bronx over the University Heights Bridge, in addition to auto shops, warehouses, a city tow pound and a Con Edison substation.

But a proposal by the Department of City Planning now undergoing environmental review would change the zoning from industrial to allow housing and retail development, including high-rise apartment towers.

Like other rezoning plans around the city, the Sherman Creek proposal would permit developers to construct larger buildings if they dedicate 20% of their units to affordable housing.

"The rezoning will create much needed additional housing, including much needed affordable housing," said City Planning Department spokeswoman Rachaele Raynoff.

The plan also would require developers to create a public esplanade along the Harlem River.

The Parks Department already has begun building five small waterfront parks at the ends of 202nd to 206th Sts.

The parks, expected to be completed this summer, will include areas for picnicking and barbecuing as well as game tables, waterfront seating and a spray shower for kids.

And they will provide access to the river, with spots for fishing and a kayak launch.

As for the Bronx, the proposal fits in nicely with the long-term hope of Borough President Adolfo Carrión to see major development of a greenway along the Harlem River, said a spokesman.

Although there is general agreement in the community that more housing and retail and office space are desperately needed, some have opposed the plan, calling for a greater number of affordable apartments.

Still, City Councilman Miguel Martinez (D-Manhattan) called the zoning plan a "tremendous opportunity" for the area.

"There has not been very much development in upper Manhattan," he said, adding he was hopeful new development would increase affordable housing in the area and spur opportunities for homeownership.

One wild card remains Con Edison, which owns about 30% of the land in the Sherman Creek area.

A Con Ed representative said the utility has no immediate plans to sell any of its holdings in the neighborhood and intends to build a second substation.
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Old March 14th, 2007, 10:46 PM   #791
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/03132007...eve_cuozzo.htm
COOPER U. IS GOING FOR $$

March 13, 2007 -- SEEKING to exploit the growing taste for office buildings in untraditional locations, The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is putting a big Astor Place development site on the block.

Cooper Union is offering a 99-year ground lease on 51 Astor Place, currently home to its Engineering Building between Third and Fourth avenues.

Studley's Woody Heller, Will Silverman and David Endelman will field offers.

A buyer can raze the old building for a new, mostly commercial project. The site has been pre-approved by the city for a structure of 270,000 "zoned" square feet, of which 220,000 are slated for offices, 40,000 for community use and 10,000 for stores. The 270,000-foot total will likely be marketed as around 350,000 "rentable" square feet.

Heller said the current classroom building on the 51 Astor Place site is not as efficient as Cooper Union's Foundation building just to the south. To replace the Engineering Building, the school is breaking ground on a new building at 41 Cooper Square nearby.

That project is to be finished in February 2009, when a buyer of the 51 Astor Place ground lease would take possession of the site.

Heller declined to estimate what the ground lease might fetch. But he said that if the land were sold outright, "Its worth would be no less than $350 per buildable square foot."

He noted that a new building on the site would enjoy both proximity to the Lexington Avenue subway station across the street as well as "remarkable exposure," thanks to its position on an island between the two wide avenues.

The artsy Astor Place neighborhood might once have seemed an unusual address for a new tower devoted mostly to offices. But Heller says Manhattan developers and tenants have increasingly been drawn to outside-the-box locations.

The success stories include Harry Macklowe's 610 Broadway at the corner of Houston Street, which leased up quickly, and Barry Diller's Frank Gehry-designed IAC InterActive headquarters on 11th Avenue at 18th Street.
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Old March 14th, 2007, 10:48 PM   #792
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/03142007...lois_weiss.htm
FOUR TOWERS NEAR FARLEY BROOKFIELD STILL NEEDS ANCHOR

BROOKFIELD STILL NEEDS ANCHOR

March 14, 2007 -- BROOKFIELD Properties is readying plans for four towers totaling 4.7 million feet at the rear of the Farley Post Office on the west side of Ninth Avenue between 31st and 33rd streets.

"It will be an awesome location," Ric Clark, Brookfield's CEO, said at the Young Men's and Women's Real Estate Association luncheon yesterday.

Clark said plans call for the east end of the plot to host two office towers sharing 4 million square feet while the west end will have two residential towers totaling 700,000 feet.

They hope to kick off marketing the northern office tower of 1.6 million square feet within the next few weeks, for delivery in late 2010. That process will begin with the sharing of new renderings now being prepared by Skidmore Owings Merrill.

While there's no anchor tenant yet, Clark said Brookfield is in discussions with "all the usual suspects" and expects rents to start in the $80 range.

Would they break ground without an anchor tenant? "Never say never," Clark said. "But we would need to know the Moynihan Train Station was going forward."
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Old March 14th, 2007, 11:27 PM   #793
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are 4 mio sqft. much for two towers?
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Old March 15th, 2007, 01:11 AM   #794
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Forget about the WTC (if you don't like it). New York will have much bigger projects coming soon.
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Old March 15th, 2007, 03:34 PM   #795
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Quote:
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Forget about the WTC (if you don't like it). New York will have much bigger projects coming soon.
i'm really excited
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Old March 15th, 2007, 05:18 PM   #796
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goldman saches

i love the goldman saches tower .hope them finish the project quick . believe they are capable of doing it . for they make such a huge profit last year .and the financial industry is expected to be prosperous this year
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Old March 15th, 2007, 09:05 PM   #797
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Speaking of Goldman Sachs, does anyone have an update on the construction? They've been doing foundation work for some time now, and I'd think they're getting close to starting the steel work.
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Old March 15th, 2007, 09:20 PM   #798
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Taken on March 13, 2007 by lofter1 at Wirednewyork....



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Old March 17th, 2007, 12:11 AM   #799
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riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisin
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Old March 17th, 2007, 05:49 PM   #800
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There should be an own thread for the new Goldman Sachs Headquater !
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