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Old April 18th, 2007, 12:04 AM   #841
Don Omar
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Standard Hotel (848 Washington Street)


Out of all the proposes that are popping up around the High Line, this one is one the most imposing.

Great building, but will have a impact on the High Line.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 12:44 AM   #842
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More towers! This is getting insane! :P
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Old April 18th, 2007, 01:45 AM   #843
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/15/re...ate&oref=login
Now Open for Living, as Well as Business

By JENNIFER BLEYER
Published: April 15, 2007


Uli Seit for The New York Times
URBAN RETAIL The Fulton Street Mall, a destination for hip-hop music and electronics, is in a neighborhood on the cusp of population growth.


MATTHEW AND LORI RICHMOND were newly married and living in Greenpoint when they began looking for a home to buy in 2005. They yearned to be near multiple subway lines, having spent several years relegated almost exclusively to the L train, and with busy careers as designers and little time to renovate, they wanted a new building that they could move into right away.

They were familiar with Brooklyn’s stylish brownstone neighborhoods, but less so with its downtown, a shabby-fringed commercial district that bustles during the day with 100,000 workers but is nearly deserted at night. Still, when they were shown an apartment in Boulevard East, an 11-story tawny-brick condominium on Boerum Place on downtown Brooklyn’s border, they quickly perceived the area’s residential possibilities.

Ms. Richmond’s father, Domenic Mozzone, had worked in the nearby MetroTech office complex and advised the couple that with a staggering 12 subway lines within six blocks of Boulevard East, the apartment was most likely a solid investment. They put a deposit on a 900-square-foot unit with two bedrooms, two bathrooms and an open kitchen the same day they saw it. They have been thrilled with their choice ever since.

“We’re in the crux of all these amazing neighborhoods,” said Ms. Richmond, 30, who gave birth to their first child, Cooper, in January. “I walk two blocks this way, I’m in the heart of Brooklyn Heights. I walk two blocks that way, I’m in Carroll Gardens. And because of the close proximity to all the trains, it was kind of like, ‘Why haven’t people been living here?’ ”

Downtown Brooklyn has long been a civic center, retail destination and, with the development of the 16-acre MetroTech complex beginning in 1989, a home for Wall Street back offices.

It hasn’t really been known as a place where people live, but a rezoning that took effect in 2004 is poised to change that, because it gave a green light to the construction of larger residential buildings.

The area now teeters on the edge of a building boom, which officials and developers predict will transform it into what they deem a “24 hour” neighborhood.

“If you walk down a street in the commercial core now at 7:30 at night, it’s very quiet,” said Joseph Chan, the president of the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, an umbrella group overseeing the area’s renewal.

“That lack of activity does not convey the sense of a vibrant downtown, and that’s going to change extraordinarily quickly with the development here.”

By Mr. Chan’s estimate, more than 7,000 residential units are in planning stages or under construction in downtown Brooklyn, not including the nearby Atlantic Yards proposal — which calls for eight million square feet of high-rise housing, office space and a basketball arena on 22 acres.

He noted that his organization was working with the Real Estate Board of New York and local property owners to fill in the neighborhood’s retail gaps.

Hal Henenson, the executive director of the development marketing group at Prudential Douglas Elliman, agreed that downtown Brooklyn is on the verge of change, attractive for its transportation options, relative affordability and proximity to borough shopping strips.

“For people who are looking for the next new neighborhood, if you will,” he said, “I think in Brooklyn, it’s downtown.”

What You’ll Find

The neighborhood stretches from the rumble of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway south to Schermerhorn Street, and from the busy shops along Court Street and Cadman Plaza West toward Flatbush Avenue to the east, where cars head toward the Manhattan Bridge.

At the area’s heart is Borough Hall, a stately Greek Revival structure facing a handsomely landscaped plaza where a farmer’s market is available two days a week year round. Farther north, Cadman Plaza Park offers a 10-acre swath of green space popular with dog walkers and office workers.

The neighborhood’s civic and commercial character remains prominent, with a heavy concentration of courts and other municipal facilities as well as the boxy MetroTech center, its modern buildings arranged around a manicured commons. Abutting MetroTech is the Fulton Street Mall area, a rollicking destination for electronics, jewelry, hip-hop music and urban street wear.

Housing at this point is limited to scattered rentals and a handful of co-ops and condominiums. An exception is Concord Village, a co-op development of more than 1,000 apartments on the edge of downtown beside the Brooklyn Bridge.

But one need only follow the trail of cranes and cement trucks to see what’s in store for the area, much of it within what Mr. Chan identifies as three nodes of development.

The first is a pocket east of the Flatbush Avenue Extension that was included in the 2004 rezoning, where several major high-rises are planned. The Oro, a glassy 40-story condominium with 303 apartments, a 50-foot swimming pool and an indoor basketball court, is already well under way there.

Next are the Schermerhorn and Livingston Street corridors. The former Board of Education headquarters at 110 Livingston is being transformed into a 299-unit condo by David Walentas, who originally envisioned the neighborhood now known as Dumbo. There is also the 158-unit State Renaissance Court on Schermerhorn Street, a mixed-income project financed by the city’s Housing Development Corporation. Both are set to open this spring.

Finally, there is a cluster of buildings being planned around the commercial core, including the BellTel Lofts, in the former Verizon Building on Willoughby Street. The residential future of the Fulton Street Mall itself was confirmed in February with the announcement that its three-story Albee Square Mall will be demolished and rebuilt, topped with 1,000 apartments.

What You’ll Pay

Although downtown Brooklyn is in its infant stages as a residential neighborhood, prices can generally be discerned from apartments sold but not yet occupied.

At 110 Livingston, the Walentas condo, 262 units have sold since last summer — from studios starting in the high $300,000s to three-bedrooms starting above $900,000. Earlier this month, a three-bedroom penthouse with an 800-square-foot terrace sold for $1.35 million. Common charges average $500 a month.

“We found that the more expensive product was what was selling quickly,” said Asher Abehsera, vice president for residential sales at the Two Trees Management Company, the building’s developer, noting that the larger three-bedrooms were almost gone. “It shows that downtown Brooklyn can handle and would like to see more high-end large condominium homes.”

Mr. Henenson of Prudential Douglas Elliman said that the commercial core, where BellTel Lofts are, offered Manhattan-style luxury at a lower cost. As he put it, “You could buy a loft in Chelsea, and the same loft in downtown Brooklyn would be literally half the price.”

Last month, Mr. Henenson noted, two apartments were bought together in BellTel for $2.5 million, to be combined into five bedrooms with four and a half bathrooms, with nearly 3,000 square feet of space.

How long prices will remain at this level, however, is a question. “We’re in the echelon of $1,000 a square foot,” said Jerry Minsky, a senior vice president at the Corcoran Group in nearby Fort Greene. “There’s enough evidence to prove that it’s not turning back.”

What to Do

Like gems in a necklace, some of the borough’s best-known amenities ring downtown. Just beyond its perimeter in Fort Greene is the Brooklyn Academy of Music; nearby, a theater and an arts library are to join what is being called the BAM Cultural District.

A stroll south along Smith Street in Carroll Gardens reveals dozens of restaurants, including the Grocery and Saul, as well as bars that brim with life on summer evenings. To the west is Brooklyn Heights, with its promenade.

Closer in, a Y.M.C.A. opened in 2005 below the Court House Apartments on Atlantic Avenue, offering a six-lane pool and children’s classes. Court Street is a main commercial artery, with a Barnes & Noble store and a 12-screen movie theater.

The History

Near the East River waterfront where Dutch farmers formed the village of Breuckelen in the 17th century, the downtown area grew as the civic heart of independent Brooklyn.

The grand City Hall was completed in 1849 and became known as Borough Hall in 1898, when Brooklyn became part of New York. Schools and churches sprouted, as well as office towers, hotels and theaters. Retailing floundered in the postwar period, although downtown Brooklyn began a new phase in the 1990s with the development of MetroTech.

The Schools

There are no public elementary schools in downtown Brooklyn, but schools in adjacent neighborhoods have received good marks.

One is Public School 8 on Hicks Street in Brooklyn Heights, which has benefited in recent years from new administration and increased parent involvement, 62 percent of students met city and state standards in English in the 2004-2005 school year, versus 61 percent citywide. Sixty-nine percent achieved the math requirements, versus 65 percent citywide.

As for private schools, downtown Brooklyn boasts a well-regarded kindergarten-through-Grade 12 institution: Brooklyn Friends, which opened in 1867 in the Quaker Meeting House on Schermerhorn Street.

The Commute

There are stations on the 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, F, M, R, B, G and Q subway lines. Some stop twice within the area, and many are one or two stops from Manhattan. Ms. Richmond, the designer, said she and her husband both had door-to-door commutes of under half an hour to the SoHo area.

In addition, the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges are nearby, as well as the Flatbush Avenue terminal of the Long Island Rail Road.

Going Forward

With thousands of new residents en route, business-centered downtown Brooklyn can swiftly morph into a livable neighborhood.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 04:55 AM   #844
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Ok this is a list of alot of proposed buildings over 12 floors in Manhattan. I know there are probably more but I don't have those renderings yet. But if someone has one that I haven't posted please let me know.


Manhattan Proposed Buildings:


200 Greenwich Street (WTC2): 78 floors - 1,254 feet



175 Greenwich Street (WTC3): 71 floors - 1,155 feet



150 Greenwich Street (WTC4): 65 floors



West Street Residential Tower: 65 floors



610 Lexington Avenue: 61 floors



440 West 42nd Street: 60 floors



605 West 42nd Street: 60 floors



160 West 62nd Street: 55 floors



Intercontinental Hotel (On Nassau Street): 55 floors



80 South Street: 50 floors - 835 feet



110 West 57th Street: 50 floors



70 West 45th Street: 50 floors



West 57th Street Tower (Next to 9A): 48 floors



22 East 23rd Street: 47 floors



301 Forty Sixth Avenue: 46 floors



Radisson Financial (99 Washington Street): 42 floors



11 Times Square: 40 floors - 600 ft



400 Park Avenue Tower: 40 floors - 417 ft



Port Authorhority Bus Terminal Office Tower: 40 floors



Two Sutton Place: 40 floors



Gold Street Hotel: 38 floors



Global Diamond Exchange Tower: 35 floors



Holiday Inn Financial (50 Trinity Place): 35 floors



Times Square Hotels (337-343 West 39th Street): 35 floors/32 floors



Sheraton Downtown (100 Greenwich Street): 35 floors



176 Madison Avenue: 34 floors



The Remy (On West 28th Street):



47 East 34th Street: 32 floors



510 Madison Avenue: 30 floors



808 Columbus Avenue: 29 floors



West 60th & 61st Street Residential Complex: 28/15/10 floors



Fairfield Inn (126 Water Street): 26 floors



210 West 91st Street: 25 floors



Chelsea Hotel (128 West 29th Street): 25 floors



1800 Park Avenue: 24 floors



Sundari Lofts (On Madison Avenue): 22 floors



160 East 22nd Street: 21 floors



Horizen (On 23rd Street): 21 floors



Museum For African Art Tower (On 5th Avenue): 21 floors



Linden 78 (On West 78th Street): 20 floors



250 East 49th Street: 20 floors



4070 Broadway: 20 floors



Holiday Inn Express (20 Maiden Lane): 20 floors



241 Fifth Avenue: 20 floors



Strand Hotel (33 West 37th Street): 19 floors



Sheraton Four Points (66 Charlton Street): 19 floors



211 East 51st Street: 19 floors



87 Lafayette Tower: 19 floors



2075 Broadway: 19 floors



Wyndham Hotel (37 West 24th Street): 18 floors



Hilton Herald Square (59 West 39th Street): 18 floors



Marriot Fairfield (116 West 28th Street): 17 floors



The New School Tower (Corner of 14th & 5th Avenue): 16 floors



East River Science Park (Complex): 15/12 floors



Delancey Tower: 15 floors



37 East 4th Street: 15 floors



The Avant (559 West 23rd Street): 13 floors



John Jay College (524 West 59th Street): 12 floors



122 Greenwich Avenue: 12 floors



245 10th Avenue: 12 floors




*********

Westside Tower (34th Street & 10th Avenue): ? floors



161 Maiden Lane: ? floors


Last edited by krull; April 18th, 2007 at 04:22 PM.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 09:52 AM   #845
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construction
Frank Gehry's Beekman Tower (8 Spruce Street): 75 stories - 850 feet
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Old April 18th, 2007, 04:15 PM   #846
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^ Yeah I know about that one. But I am afraid that the official rendering hasn't come out yet. So I guess I am waiting for that rendering.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 04:29 PM   #847
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whcih buildings have been aproved or proposed.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 04:40 PM   #848
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BSA hears NYU mega-dorm challenge





By Gabby Warshawer
April 17, 2007

Today the Board of Standards and Appeals heard a challenge filed against the Department of Building's approval of an air rights transfer that will allow Hudson Companies and New York University to build the tallest building in the East Village. The proposed university dorm, which would rise 26 stories at 110 East 12th Street, would be allowed to rise 55 percent higher than local zoning allows because the air rights being transferred are from an adjacent post office, which is immune from local zoning.

The challenge heard by the BSA, therefore, calls into question why a private developer would be able to flout zoning regulations that would not be applicable to a federally owned post office. Public officials including City Councilmember Rosie Mendez testified at the hearing.

Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, testified that the city was clearly bending zoning rules by allowing the air rights transfer and also hindering future development possibilities for the post office.

"It is a fiction for DOB to claim that they have 'transferred' development rights from the post office to the dorm site. As a federal agency, the post office has unlimited development ability for its properties, which cannot be restricted by the city," Berman testified. "Thus when the city authorizes a 'transfer' of development rights from the post office in a case like this, it is simply giving a private developer -- in this case Hudson Companies and NYU -- the ability to build larger than the zoning allows, while offering no commensurate decrease in development ability for the neighboring site, the post office."

The BSA said it will issue a decision on the challenge by June 12.


Copyright ę 2003-2007 The Real Deal.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 04:45 PM   #849
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taylorhoge View Post
whcih buildings have been aproved or proposed.
Well I don't really know that for sure. Since it will be challenge for me to keep track of all that. So I will just try to leave them as proposed. When one is under construction I will just move it to that section. Just keeping it simple.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 06:06 PM   #850
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New Hotels Planned For Long Island City


BY RICHARD GENTILVISO
April 11, 2007

Plans to open a new luxury hotel in Long Island City this spring with rates beginning at over $300 per night, are on track. The Ravel Hotel, as it will be named, replaces the infamous QPlaza Motel near the Queensboro Bridge.

Along the East River waterfront, the Q-Plaza is being converted and expanded from 23 rooms into the 78-room Ravel Hotel at a cost of $4 million. The Ravel will feature Manhattan views, many from bay windows leading out to balconies, and have a multilevel rooftop that will serve as a bar/lounge and art gallery- a far cry from the Q-Plaza, long a notorious site of reputed prostitution in the area.

Ravi Patel purchased the property in 2005 with an idea toward accommodating tourists seeking an easy alternative from Manhattan, according to a February 18 report in the New York Times Business Section. Comparable rates for hotels in Manhattan are about $400 per night.

Groundbreaking is scheduled this spring for a second hotel in Long Island City, an 11-story structure with 100 rooms, also featuring views of Manhattan at the current site of a commercial warehouse on the East River waterfront.

The Z Hotel, as it is to be called, will be less expensive, with rooms going for about $200 per night. The developer, Henry Zilberman, also plans to provide an alternative for visitors to Manhattan. The Z will offer free hourly limousine transportation service for hotel guests to Manhattan destinations. Zilberman owns several limousine businesses in Long Island City, according to the February 18 New York Times report.

In another part of the borough, two more new hotel projects are in the planning stages as well, although community approval is still needed. In Forest Hills, a 100-room luxury hotel is going before Community Board 6 for approval. The developer, Yeheskel Elias said he envisions visitors to the US Open staying at the hotel, which would be designed in the tudorstyle architecture of the area, according to a report in the February 4 New York Times.

The second project, a 10-story, 130- room hotel to be constructed on Northern Boulevard in Corona, has met with resistance from the community because of the height of the building. Marriott International said plans for the proposed Spring Hill Suites hotel have not yet been completed. The development would replace vacant auto parts warehouses, according to the February 4 New York Times.

The rezoning of Long Island City in 2001 allowed for a mix of taller residential and commercial projects, including hotels, in the area, spurring development. In 2006, Court Square Place, a 16-story, 275,000-squarefoot building was completed.

In addition, a 486,000- square-foot office building for Citigroup is being constructed near Citigroup's 48- story tower that has long towered above other structures in the area.

Also along the East River waterfront, Silvercup Studios plans to develop 2.2 million square foot of space, including 650,000 square feet of office space, 270,000 square feet of studio space, 150,000 square feet of retail space and about 1,000 units of residential housing with parking space for 1,400 cars.


Copyrightę 1999 - 2007 The Service Advertising Group Inc.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 06:19 PM   #851
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Wow great list Krull. This is getting insane! Some amazingly slender towers!
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Old April 18th, 2007, 06:32 PM   #852
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OMG! Even more towers! Are they all U/C or approved?
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Old April 18th, 2007, 06:49 PM   #853
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insane alex View Post
OMG! Even more towers! Are they all U/C or approved?
I am pretty sure some of them are approved or waiting for approval, but most of those are proposed buildings.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 09:03 PM   #854
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great work yet again krull
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Old April 18th, 2007, 09:57 PM   #855
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impressive list. please build all of these wonderful proposals
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Old April 18th, 2007, 10:15 PM   #856
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WOW I am impress! So many projects in NYC! More than I though. Great job Krull!

NYC rocks!

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Old April 18th, 2007, 10:40 PM   #857
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Wow NYC is still kickin.

The West 57th Street Tower will it b located near the new Goldman Sachs HQ or more south near castle clinton.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 11:47 PM   #858
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/18/re...ref=realestate
The Harlem Revival Brings in the Shops

By CLAIRE WILSON
Published: April 18, 2007


Tina Fineberg for The New York Times

A three-story retail complex next to the Apollo Theater is planned.



Tina Fineberg for The New York Times

Carol’s Daughter is one retailer marketing to more prosperous Harlem customers.


An increasingly vigorous retail scene on Harlem’s main commercial street is likely to gain further headway in the next five years as four parcels are set for development into offices and shops geared to a residential population that is becoming more prosperous.

Scattered along the bustling 125th Street corridor from Second Avenue to Amsterdam Avenue in northern Manhattan, each of the projects includes two or more floors of retailing aimed to attract high-profile and high-fashion national chains that historically have been absent from the mix in Harlem. Real estate professionals say they understand that a prominent department store is also looking at the street.

“Retailers are getting the message,” said Eric S. Yarbro, senior vice president of CB Richard Ellis, a commercial brokerage firm. “They are looking at the market and wondering how they can tap into the existing density and those higher-income families that now have to go south of 96th Street to get the basic services they need.”

The projects that are on the books include a 30,000-square-foot three-story retail complex at 261 West 125th Street next to the Apollo Theater. It is being developed by Grid Properties in partnership with the Gotham Organization, according to Drew Greenwald, the president of Grid Properties. The site had been a vacant lot since the mid-1980s, when fire destroyed a small office building.

On the corner of West 125th Street and Lenox Avenue, Wharton Realty is developing a 33,000-square-foot parcel into 230,000 square feet of space that includes three stories of retailing and either a community facility or residential units on upper floors. The shops could open as early as next spring. A five-story building with about a dozen stores at ground level formerly occupied the site.

Vornado Realty Trust will be developing the southwest corner of Park Avenue and East 125th Street. According to a spokeswoman, the project is expected to be in excess of 600,000 square feet with several levels of retailing capped by numerous floors of office space. Formerly a parking lot owned by the New York College of Podiatric Medicine, it is adjacent to the Metro-North train station.

On East 125th Street between Second and Third Avenues, a proposed development involves three contiguous parcels owned by New York City. From October to January, the city’s Economic Development Corporation solicited bids for the six-acre site, where the plans include 300,000 square feet of retail space. A portion of that is expected to be taken by national chains while other space is earmarked for local retailers, restaurants, a movie theater, nonprofit cultural groups and 1,000 units of affordable housing. According to the development corporation, a hotel is also a possibility. In the late 1990s, there were plans to develop the site into an outlet mall, but community opposition quashed that idea.

The final size and scope of the new projects will not be determined until a river-to-river rezoning plan currently in the works is passed by the City Planning Department; no date has been set for approval.

Business is brisk, meanwhile, along the corridor. FedEx Kinkos signed its first lease in the area last month, joining a roster that includes Staples, Starbucks, Marshall’s, Pathmark, Children’s Place, Old Navy and H&M.

A Chase bank branch is moving to a larger 6,000-square-foot location adjacent to its original in Harlem USA, a multilevel urban retail complex, where other tenants are also expanding. Open only since December, Chuck E. Cheese, the Texas-based family entertainment and restaurant chain, is adding 5,000 square feet to its original 15,000 square feet of space. The New York Sports Clubs, one of the charter tenants in the complex when it opened in 2003, is expanding for the second time.

According to Mr. Greenwald, the developer with the Gotham Organization of Harlem USA, his lessees on this swath of 125th Street report that average sales in January were 30 percent ahead of sales one year earlier.

Among locally owned businesses that are specifically aimed at more sophisticated customers are Citarella, the specialized grocery chain; the high-end MAC makeup line; and Carol’s Daughter, a bath-and-skin-care products company. Others include the restaurant Mo-Bay, which serves Southern and Jamaican specialties; the Harlem Lanes bowling alley and restaurant; the Triple Candie gallery exhibition space; and farther afield, a brunch spot called the Settepani Bakery.

According to Barbara Askins, president and chief executive of the 125th Street Business Improvement District, the vacancy rate has hovered between 2 and 3 percent for some time.

Despite that, and the street’s status as a transportation hub with subways, buses and a Metro-North station, rents have remained much lower than in comparable shopping corridors around the city.

Rates are now $150 to $200 on prime blocks between Lenox Avenue and St. Nicholas Avenue, according to figures provided by RKF & Associates. This compares with $400 a square foot for comparable property on East 86th Street and Lexington Avenue or $275 a square foot on Broadway in the West 80s and West 90s. Both of those areas are relatively near to Harlem and are already frequented by residents of the neighborhood.

Prices on 125th Street have increased by only 50 percent over the last five years, said Barry Fishbach, executive vice president for RKF. Prices in the two neighborhoods farther south have doubled in that time.

Prices on 125th Street vary greatly according to location and age of the buildings, which range from 100-year-old low-rise structures to gleaming complexes like the Harlem Center.

Eugene Fata, principal in the Fata Organization, who owns a number of buildings on West 125th Street, as well as a vacant parcel at 350 West 125th Street, says the spread among his leases is from $30 a square foot to “$200 in select corner locations.”

Scott Auster, a broker with the Ripco Real Estate Corporation, said rents on East 125th Street are much lower than those on the busier West 125th Street. “Rents range from about $100 per square foot to $125 per square foot on East 125th Street,” he said. “It’s less developed. There’s less retail over all and less traffic.”

But, over all, the continued vigor of the housing market from 96th Street to 145th Street and the planned expansion of Columbia University are giving the area the critical mass of consumers that attract retailers.
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Old April 19th, 2007, 04:51 AM   #859
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nice and massive projects. BUT will it fits to the old skyline??
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Old April 19th, 2007, 09:23 PM   #860
Ebola
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Location: New York City
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Watch out, world. New York is going to start to rise extremely tall soon. A 90-story+ hotel tower has been proposed (for the Javits Center.) It will be the tallest hotel in America if it gets a green light.

Last edited by Ebola; April 19th, 2007 at 09:52 PM.
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