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Old April 28th, 2007, 02:47 PM   #901
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NY will have the best skyline forever!!
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Old April 29th, 2007, 05:39 AM   #902
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Found some new developement in the East Williamsburg section of Brooklyn of Forgotten NY, though it's not that special.













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Old May 1st, 2007, 09:54 PM   #903
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Latest Developments in a Crosstown Rivalry


Jeff Wilpon, the Mets’ chief operating officer, giving a tour of the Citi Field construction site last month.

By RICHARD SANDOMIR
Published: May 1, 2007
nytimes.com

Home plate at Citi Field in Flushing is marked by a patch of Astroturf. In the Bronx, an outcropping of New York schist was leveled by chisel hammers attached to earth movers to clear the land for the future home plate at the new Yankee Stadium.

The pitcher’s mound in the Bronx will be where a yellow Dumpster rests, while a steel span in Flushing that emulates the Hell Gate bridge over the East River will soon support the concourse in right-center field.

The Mets and the Yankees are racing to open their new stadiums by opening day 2009. Those passing the construction sites — huge rocky pits that are filled with cranes, earth movers, steel, giant pieces of precast concrete — see the concrete frame of one stadium rising in the Bronx over former parkland and another one of steel ascending over parking spaces beside Shea Stadium.

“This place is so big, so wide open now, but when it’s filled with grass and seats, it will envelop you,” said Jeff Wilpon, the chief operating officer of the Mets, as he walked through the Citi Field site during a recent tour.

Behind him, Shea remains, a vestige of an unadventurous period in sports architecture. “A dull, dingy place,” Wilpon said.

In his office, Wilpon keeps a miniature replica of Ebbets Field, a daily reminder of the architectural muse of Citi Field. It includes the rotunda through which Brooklyn Dodgers fans, including his father, Fred, the Mets’ principal owner, used to enter. He removed the tiny rotunda piece from the rest of the model and said, “Fred can tell us how it used to smell in there.”

A reimagined rotunda, which will be named for Jackie Robinson, is also beginning to take shape; so is the footprint of the Great Hall, a meeting place, among other things, through which many of the fans visiting the new Yankee Stadium will enter. It will stand 60 feet high and span left field to right field, along 161st Street, from Jerome Avenue to River Avenue.

“It will be unparalleled, similar in scope to the Grand Central Station waiting room,” said Valerie Peltier, a managing director for development of Tishman Speyer, on a tour of the Yankee Stadium site last week. Tishman Speyer is overseeing construction of the $800 million stadium. Jerry Speyer, the company’s president, is on the board of Yankee Global Enterprises.

Executives from each team said that they were not competing with each other over who would have the better ballpark. It is almost enough that the deals were made, with city and state contributions for infrastructure and other nonconstruction costs, to let the teams build new ballparks. Since 1991, 18 new major league stadiums have been built.

“After nothing happening for 15 or 20 years, it’s all happening here in the same time period,” said Dave Howard, an executive vice president of the Mets. Beside the ballparks, the Devils’ arena in Newark is nearly done, the Jets and the Giants are planning construction of their shared Meadowlands stadium, and the Nets hope to start building their arena in Brooklyn soon.

The first level of the steel structure in Flushing is nearly in place, with yellow caution tape flapping in the wind, affording a raw view of a design fiat: fans will be able to see the field nearly anywhere they walk along the 40-foot-wide concourses, except from behind the Sterling luxury boxes that are 18 rows from field level, a club on the Promenade level and a restaurant in left field.

“In the old stadiums, nobody thought about that,” Wilpon said.

Three levels of concrete structure are in various stages of completion at the new Yankee Stadium, more along right field than left. Rakers, 40-foot pieces of steel onto which the seats will be installed, will be arriving next week. A crane to handle the steel is being assembled.

The construction already obscures a portion of the rusted elevated train tracks and takes place around a New York City Transit substation that will eventually be blocked by the giant outfield scoreboard.

Nascent dugouts are visible in little excavations several feet below field level across a rocky landscape from which 350 cubic yards of dirt were removed before construction began. The future site of Monument Park is below a platform that supports several office trailers.

“The most interesting thing to me,” said Lonn Trost, the chief operating officer of the Yankees, looking over the site, “is to take the tradition of Yankee Stadium, replicate it here, and provide fans with something new.”

The new stadium will have the same field dimensions as the current one, with more seats angled to the infield. It will also resurrect the original exterior with limestone, concrete and granite, and recreate the frieze that ringed the stadium, with 39 sections of white-painted steel weighing six tons each, to be made in Quebec. The new frieze should not turn green in the air, as did the old copper one, which was removed in the 1974-5 stadium renovation.

Some of the 24,000 pieces of precast concrete that will comprise the Citi Field exterior are already in Flushing, some weighing 1,000 pounds. The front of each piece is covered with bricks, which are sliced lengthwise to reduce the weight yet create the impression of a brick facade. It is so different in architectural ambition and style from the original Shea design of blue and orange tiles arranged over exposed ramps.

“By the end of this season, most of the exterior facade will be in place,” Howard said. “It will look like the virtual model we have online.”

Shea still serves a purpose, beyond housing the Mets for two more seasons, and it is not simply to underscore the limits of the dual-purpose stadiums. Inside an unused section of the World’s Fair-era hulk, the Mets have built a showroom that depicts what the 10 Sterling and 40 Excelsior luxury suites will look like (the former will have bathrooms modeled on the Four Seasons restaurant’s). Various types of seats can be tested for comfort.

The team is also using the showroom to assess carpeting, tile, color and other design schemes — Jeff Wilpon, who grew up in the family’s real estate development business, can offer a spiel about terrazzo floors — for the suites, clubhouses and concourses. The concourses may have glazed wall tile.

“I want to know what we’ve designed before we sell it,” Wilpon said.

The $600 million stadium will reflect its era, as its predecessor did. Shea’s opening was envisioned for 1962, the Mets’ inaugural season, but after delays, it took about two more years to complete. The original Yankee Stadium took an astonishingly quick 284 days to finish in time, providing the team with a home of its own after being told to leave the Polo Grounds.

“How often do you get to build Yankee Stadium?” Peltier said. “Never.”

Well, almost.


The new Yankee Stadium is expected to be completed in time for opening day of the 2009 season.


The new ballpark, to be built in the parking lot of the existing Queens ballpark, Shea Stadium, will have a capacity of 45,000, down from the current 57,333.


In their new stadium, the Yankees plan to place about 30,000 seats on the first level and 20,000 in the second level, giving more fans a closer view of the field than the current stadium provides.
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:23 AM   #904
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/29/re...ref=realestate
Park Condos, but the Park Comes Later

By JEFF VANDAM
Published: April 29, 2007


Creative Design Associates/Michael Van Valkenberg Associates
Water Views A rendering of One Brooklyn Bridge Park. Sales are under way even though most of the park doesn’t yet exist.


FOR years, the yellowish warehouse building at 360 Furman Street, a fast-moving thoroughfare beneath the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway in Brooklyn Heights, served as a distribution center and storage space for the Jehovah’s Witnesses, whose headquarters are still nearby. As one of the few remaining commercial structures in operation on the waterfront, 360 Furman often seemed a curiosity to people ambling about on the Brooklyn Heights Promenade a few blocks away.

Today, giant orange banners advertise the building’s new status as a 449-unit condominium called One Brooklyn Bridge Park. Though the park in its title — or most of it, anyway — does not yet exist, condo sales are under way, and the development is being described by its marketers as the largest residential conversion of a building in the history of Kings County.

“There’s nothing like this in New York,” said Robert A. Levine, the chief operating officer of the RAL Companies & Affiliates, the building’s developer, looking out a window facing New York Harbor and the financial district from what will eventually become one of the building’s duplex town house units. “You can step out of your living room and be directly on the water,” he said.

The 14-story warehouse was built in an elongated H shape in 1928, and conversion work has been in progress for the last 18 months.

Though groups of residents in the area who are against current plans for the park sued last year to keep market-rate apartments from being built, a state judge dismissed their lawsuit in November. Today, work is proceeding on condominiums ranging from $550,000 to $7 million. The developer is aiming for a move-in time frame of November or December.

After corralling his visitors amid puddles and parked trucks in the building’s future lobby, which now serves as a garage, Mr. Levine took them up to the seventh floor, where floor-to-ceiling windows in a corner unit offered generous views of Manhattan and Brooklyn. (Corner staircases were removed from the building to create such vistas, with design by CDA Architects; some windows are as much as nine feet high.)

The building will ultimately have a wide variety of apartment configurations, from high-ceilinged 588-square-foot studios to multibedroom penthouses with up to 4,638 square feet — as well as those town houses, on the west side, nearest to the water.

“It was really, in a sense, to create that community feeling, that flexibility for people,” Mr. Levine said, speaking of the range of layouts. All kitchens will have Dada cabinets, Bosch ovens and Hansgrohe bath fixtures. There will be two parking garages — one with 132 spaces for sale to One Brooklyn Bridge Park occupants, the other a 500-space lot open to the public, with hourly rates.

Besides typical luxury condo amenities like a fitness center and a meeting room, the building will also have landscaped gardens and an indoor golf simulator, like the one in regular use by the layabouts on the HBO series “Entourage.”

Sales have been open for the last few weeks, but only to those on a waiting list, which Mr. Levine said had reached 4,000 people. General sales will open by the end of April, he said. A sales center with a mural of Brooklyn Bridge Park’s eventual layout is already open; the mural depicts the building as surrounded by 85 acres of soccer fields, promenades, docks for boats, bicycle paths, open green areas and playgrounds.

Despite vocal opposition from community groups — which object to the building of private apartments in ostensibly public spaces — construction on it is set to begin this summer, said Errol Cockfield, a spokesman for the Empire State Development Corporation.

Though the building’s views of Manhattan and New York Harbor are a major selling point, some units do face the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. In fact, a few are almost level with the roadway. Responding to questions about how loud it must be inside these units, Mr. Levine took visitors into an east-facing apartment that had two open windows, both level with the highway.

Closing the windows, he said: “See? You can hardly hear it.”

And he was not incorrect.
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:24 AM   #905
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/01/ny...l?ref=nyregion
Bloomberg Unveils Plan to Redevelop Willets Point

By ANAHAD O’CONNOR and TERRY PRISTIN
Published: May 1, 2007

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg unveiled today what he called his master plan to transform the Willets Point section of Queens, an unsightly enclave of junkyards and auto-repair shops near Shea Stadium, into a retailing and entertainment district with new homes and office space.

Standing at the Queens Museum in the shadow of Flushing Meadow Park, Mayor Bloomberg called the neighborhood one of the most contaminated in the city, and described a proposal that would create 5,500 units of mixed-income housing, 500,000 square feet of office space, a 700-room hotel, a two-acre park, and a new bridge into Flushing over Flushing Creek. Over all, the mayor said, the project would create 20,000 construction jobs and 6,100 permanent jobs, and would generate at least $1.5 billion in revenue for the city.

The new neighborhood, including a new school, would rise across the street from the site where the New York Mets are building their new stadium, CitiField.

“After a century of blight and neglect, this neighborhood’s future is very bright indeed,” Mr. Bloomberg said. “This will be the first truly green community, with buildings that use the latest energy efficient technology and parks and open spaces that give New Yorkers new places to play.”

For decades, political leaders have sought to revitalize the neighborhood that Robert Moses once described as an “eyesore and a disgrace to the borough of Queens.” But the plan announced today is the most detailed ever put forward, and it sets in motion the formal environmental review and public approval process necessary for the city to rezone the area and acquire the land.

The city has said it intends to acquire the land through eminent domain if owners are unwilling to sell their property, and today Mr. Bloomberg reiterated his belief that cleaning up Willets Point — also known as the Iron Triangle — would satisfy the definition of public purpose that the Supreme Court’s eminent domain decision requires.

“But my hope is that we don’t have to use eminent domain at all,” he said.

According to surveys conducted by Hunter College, Willets Point is home to only one actual resident. The neighborhood is mostly a cluster of 225 auto parts and repair businesses — many of them operating out of tin or cinder-block sheds — that would have to be relocated if the plan goes into effect. By the city’s count, those businesses provide jobs to about 1,300 people.

The mayor has said that the city will work to make the relocation process as smooth as possible, and has offered to provide job training and other assistance to displaced workers. But many business owners say they do not intend to go quietly, and several who attended the news conference this afternoon complained that the city has not sat down with them to address their needs.

“There’s not a blade of grass, there is no empty land for us,” said Jake Bono, a co-owner of Bono Sawdust, a 74-year-old business in Willets Point. “Any empty land has a crane on it.”

If Mayor Bloomberg’s plan becomes a reality — which would likely take years because the city has yet to choose a developer — it would entail an expensive environmental cleanup. The streets of Willets Point are pockmarked with potholes, there are no sidewalks or sewers, and years of petroleum spills have led to a buildup of pollutants. The area’s high water table has allowed much of that pollution to seep into groundwater and contaminate Flushing Bay and Flushing River.

A public hearing on an upcoming environmental study of the site is scheduled for later this afternoon.

“For far too long, the Willets Point peninsula has been an area marked by unrealized potential and neglect, inhibiting growth in Downtown Flushing and Corona and steadily becoming more polluted,” Mayor Bloomberg said this afternoon. “Today, finally, we’re doing something about it.”

But the Bloomberg administration’s plan is only the latest of a long series of proposals to revitalize Willets Point.

In the 1960s, Robert Moses tried to use park money to clean up the site, but was beaten back by business owners. Then in 1985, Gov. Mario M. Cuomo supported a plan to build a domed football stadium in the neighborhood — a proposal that died when no National Football League team would commit to playing there.

Other schemes for Willets Point — put forward by the Mets, the Queens borough president and Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani — have also fallen flat. After the West Side stadium proposal was defeated, Mayor Bloomberg talked about putting press and broadcast centers in Willets Point as part of the city’s last-minute plan to salvage its 2012 Olympic bid. London was chosen as the Olympics site instead.
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 11:35 PM   #906
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/05012007...zzo.htm?page=0
HOTEL KING'S LATEST

CHANG PLANS FULL-SERVICE BOUTIQUE INN FOR W. 56TH ST.


FACELIFT: This rendering of the new façade for 655 Madison Ave. is scheduled to be finished by the end of the year.

May 1, 2007 -- HOTEL king Sam Chang has claimed another slice of Midtown for a new inn - a 14-story, 20,000-square-foot, full-service boutique property he plans to build at 20 W. 56th St. between Fifth and Sixth avenues, a few doors west of jeweler Harry Winston.

Chang's McSam Hotel Group just bought the doomed, existing five-story building on a 2,500-square-foot lot for $7.5 million. The small site can support the new hotel without needing any additional air rights.

Eastern Consolidated's Alan P. Miller brought in the buyer; the same firm's Eric M. Anton and Ronald A. Solarz repped the seller, Japanese investors True World Group.

Until last month, the address was home to Japanese restaurant Kiiroi Hana, which True World opened in 1983. "Its owners realized the time was right to cash in on their long-term investment," Solarz said.

The bustling, long West 56th Street block is also home to a much larger project - Nos. 31-39, now a large hole in the ground, where Manhattan Century Properties and the Stillman Organization are working on a mixed-use luxury condo.

But for the estate of late real estate legend Sol Goldman, Chang's site at 20 W. 56th might be the one that got away. Sources said heirs Jane Goldman and Alan Goldman own the adjacent small buildings at 18 and 22 W. 56th as well as a contiguous property on West 55th.

The Kiiroi Hana building would have given the Goldmans about 75 feet of uninterrupted frontage, but the sale to Chang broke up the nascent assemblage. "It may be they weren't aware True World wanted to sell - this was one of those under-the-radar transactions," our source said.

Miller said Chang has nearly 4,000 new rooms under construction in the city at more than two dozen locations. He has seven hotels under construction on West 39th Street between Eighth and Ninth avenues.

Chang owns the real estate and signs up management companies to operate the hotels, which are flagged as Hilton Gardens, Holiday Inn Express and other brands.

*

The once dowdy office building at 655 Madison Ave. at 60th Street is getting a new skin, new lobby, new systems - and a new lease on life as a prime Plaza District office address.

In recent years the owners of early 1950s-vintage building watched the more glamorous towers in Barneys country fetch rents above $100 a square foot.

Tenants at 655 Madison were paying half that. "It was a Class-B building at a Class-A address," says Andrew Roos, one of several principals of GVA Williams who own the tower. "We were the low-cost providers in the neighborhood, which we didn't want to be.

"We were surrounded by the likes of 667 Madison, buildings much newer or reskinned," Roos said. Recently, "We decided we wanted to be commensurate with our neighbors."

So the owners are spending more than $15 million on improvements, including a new curtain wall designed by Swanke Hayden Connell chief architect Richard Hayden.

When the job is done by the end of the year, 655 Madison will sport a new façade of tinted gray glass above a granite base, replacing what Roos calls the "ugly" former painted gray spandrels and stone.

The GVA partners have about 90,000 square feet available in the 250,000-square-footer, now home to office tenants Loews and Estée Lauder and retail stores DKNY and Anne Klein.

Roos said the "beautiful" result will be attractive to boutique European firms and hedge funds willing to pay "triple-digit" rents.

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Old May 5th, 2007, 12:51 AM   #907
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Real Estate Tax Change Is Certain, Degree Is Not


By ELIOT BROWN
Special to the Sun
May 3, 2007

As the state Legislature works on revising a tax break for New York City developers, the law could see new, more expansive provisions for affordable housing. Any added requirements, however, undoubtedly will raise hackles within the real estate community.

With multiple bills expected to be introduced in the next few weeks, a number of state legislators are pushing to expand the scope of the existing law — a residential development incentive known as Section 421-a that originally passed in 1971 — by adding significant new affordable housing requirements for developers seeking to qualify for the tax break.

The current law, passed at a time when new construction was scarce, allows developers to get a tax break on projects built in most parts of the city, and has been an attractive incentive that has spurred construction. While housing advocates say the proposed changes in many of the bills would provide incentives to build muchneeded affordable housing, the real estate industry has long been opposed to any alteration in the subsidy, claiming the proposed regulations would slow a residential construction boom of historic proportions.

Similar negotiations over Section 421-a abatements occurred in the City Council last fall. In December, after weeks of debate, the council passed changes that expanded the law's affordability provisions. Under the council's provision, in order to get the tax break, developers will be required to make 20% of a new building's units available at rents affordable to people making 80% of the area's median income. The revised abatement, whose benefits vary depending on location, level of government assistance, and other factors, will be available in a large portion of Manhattan, and in designated areas in Brooklyn and Queens. For the changes to take effect, however, the state needs to pass its own version of the law, which is set to expire at the end of this year.

Analysts say any bill likely to pass in Albany will probably expand affordable housing requirements at least moderately beyond what the City Council proposed, a move that would further irritate developers already angry over the council bill's passage. Bills currently in the hoppers of the state Senate and Assembly mandate that developers make 30% of their housing units affordable at sites citywide, 10% more than what the council's law proposed, in order to qualify for the tax benefit.

The real estate industry has been speaking out against aspects of the proposed changes for months. The president of the Real Estate Board of New York, Steven Spinola, said yesterday that the City Council's law was too restrictive.

"I'm not going to hesitate on that: I think the mayor's proposal and the City Council went way too far," Mr. Spinola said. "I believe this is going to have a negative impact on the building of affordable housing, and the building of housing."

State Senator Elizabeth Krueger, a Democrat of Manhattan, who is planning to introduce legislation that includes affordability provisions even more expansive than those of the current bills, said existing incentives have more room for restrictions.

"Everyone is building everywhere," Ms. Kruger said. "Nothing we do with 421-a is going to stop building in New York City."

The politics of the issue are such that the influence determining the final form of the changes will likely lie with the state Senate's four New York City Republicans, legislators say. A proposal in the Democratic-controlled Assembly seems to have strong early support; in the Republican-controlled Senate, the majority leader, Joseph Bruno, may defer to the local legislators because the law only applies to the city.

Senator Serphin Maltese, a Republican of Queens, is sponsoring a bill that expands the affordability requirements of the law, though other area Republicans have not yet signed on, and is optimistic about its chances.

" Senator Bruno has been always very responsive to me and the New York City Republicans," Mr. Maltese said in a phone interview. "There's no city in the United States that needs affordable housing more than New York."

A spokesman for Senator Frank Padavan, a Republican who represents parts of Queens, the Bronx and Nassau County, said he supports a bill similar to that passed by the City Council, but that he did not support Mr. Maltese's recent bill. ( Republican Senators Martin Golden of Brooklyn, and Andrew Lanza of Staten Island, did not return calls for comment by press time.)

The city's other major Republican office holder, Mayor Bloomberg, does not have any direct power in the legislature, but is likely to push for a bill that mirrors the law passed by the City Council and signed by the mayor.

"We hope that the legislature sees the large consensus from the City Council and the mayor in the legislation that was passed in December, and considers that as it looks to extend 421-a," a spokesman for the city's department of Housing Preservation and Development, Neill Coleman, said.


© 2007 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.
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Old May 5th, 2007, 07:43 AM   #908
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what is the problem in Brooklyn, can nothing develop?
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Old May 5th, 2007, 07:43 AM   #909
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Arts Library Planned in Brooklyn Hits a Snag


The latest plan for the BAM Cultural District no longer includes the Visual and Performing Arts Library designed by Enrique Norten.

By ROBIN POGREBIN
Published: May 3, 2007
nytimes.com

The new arts library designed by Enrique Norten that was supposed to rise like the prow of a glass ship near the Brooklyn Academy of Music now seems likely to sink, unrealized, into the pavement.

All the same, planners say they have raised money for a new theater designed by Hugh Hardy for the academy and hope to break ground next year.

Eight months after the city stepped up its role in overseeing development in what is known as the BAM Cultural District, in Fort Greene, projects are being assessed as viable or unrealistic.

“The library project as designed has not proved to be feasible,” said Kate D. Levin, commissioner of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “However, there is a continued commitment to build on that site and have some component be a library.”

With a revolving door of directors, the Brooklyn Public Library system has not raised any of what it estimates as a $135 million price for the Visual and Performing Arts Library. Initially, the system had planned to break ground on the project in 2005, with a grand opening this year. But two of its directors have come and gone since planning began, and a third, Dionne Mack-Harvin, assumed her post only in March.

In a statement, Ms. Mack-Harvin said yesterday that she still hoped to see a library built in the area. “While at this time we do not have the funds needed to build the V.P.A. as originally envisioned, we are still looking at options for funding, including seeking partners to assist in financing,” she said. “We realize the importance of providing free resources and services to Brooklynites — especially in this rapidly growing area.”

Mr. Norten said he still hoped to design the project in its altered form. “It will have to be a completely new design, but it could be even better,” he said. “I’m very excited about revising all of this.”

With its cantilevered glass envelope, Mr. Norten’s library had drawn wide praise as a bold and colorful design that would anchor the district’s artistic ambitions. Alan H. Fishman, the chairman of the academy, said he was sorry to see it go. “The design was so captivating,” he said.

Meanwhile, he said, the academy has raised enough pledges to move ahead with designs for a $40 million annex on Ashland Place, bordered by Lafayette Avenue and Hanson Place, that is to include a 300-seat theater, education activities and archives. Mr. Hardy, the architect, is also designing, with Frank Gehry, a new home in the cultural district for the Theater for a New Audience, at Lafayette Avenue and Ashland Place.

Mr. Fishman is also co-chairman of the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, created last summer as an umbrella organization to coordinate planning in the area as the city sought to jump-start a languishing redevelopment effort. Among the groups consolidated under the partnership were the BAM Local Development Corporation, which had previously overseen the arts district; the Downtown Brooklyn Council; the Fulton Mall Improvement Association; and the MetroTech Business Improvement District.

Joseph Chan left his post as a senior policy adviser in Deputy Mayor Daniel L. Doctoroff’s office last September to become president of the partnership.

“I think what you see is tangible progress on all of the major initiatives,” Mr. Chan said. “We wanted to put every project on a design and construction timeline, with clear lines of accountability and a clear set of expectations and milestones.”

The city has $75 million in financing allocated for the cultural district through fiscal 2009. “We want to make sure there is an appropriate marriage of resources, capability and intent for every project we do,” Mr. Doctoroff said.

Some Brooklyn arts executives say the new leadership has made a difference. “This has been a very positive development,” said Harvey Lichtenstein, the former academy impresario who is now chairman of cultural planning for the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership. “It gives it stronger backing from the mayor’s office, from the city and of course in terms of connections.”

The BAM Cultural District was conceived in 2000 as a $650 million effort to revitalize the area by converting vacant and underused properties into spaces for arts organizations. Since then, with the explosion of Brooklyn’s residential real estate market, developers have become an important force in the arts district.

Plans now call for a new headquarters for Danspace Project, which commissions and presents contemporary choreography, to be built at Ashland Place and Fulton Street, with a 20-story residential tower on top. A formal request for proposals went out to developers in February, and responses are due on May 18. David Walentas, the developer behind much of the Dumbo area of Brooklyn, said he would submit a proposal.

Mr. Walentas said he would consider being part of a revised library project that would also include private uses. He declined to elaborate.

The chosen developer is expected to pay for the building’s structure and the apartments, half of which are to be affordable housing. “The city wants to see as big a contribution as possible from the development team,” Mr. Chan said.

Meanwhile, some of those involved are concerned about whether Danspace will be able to raise its own share, estimated at $10 million to $15 million. “They’re a small organization and they’ve never done this kind of fund-raising,” Mr. Lichtenstein said. “But I’m going to help them.”

The city said it had not yet determined its contribution to the Danspace headquarters, which is intended to offer affordable studio space to a multitude of choreographers.

In a few weeks, the Theater for a New Audience, an Off Broadway company that produces Shakespeare and classical drama, is expected to present new designs for a building that would be its first permanent home. The landscape architect Ken Smith was selected in December to design a public plaza and streetscape for the new district. In March the city issued a request for proposals for a multilevel underground parking garage topped by a public plaza in the district.

Not all of Brooklyn is enthusiastic about the way the district has evolved. Some public officials worry that the private development will price out local residents, and complain that Brooklyn cultural groups have been sidelined.

“I want indigenous organizations incorporated into the district,” said City Councilwoman Letitia James, who represents Fort Greene.

Yet other projects are still being dreamed up. Mr. Lichtenstein, for example, said he would like to see a “major visual art facility.”

“I always had this crazy vision of Brooklyn being the Left Bank of New York,” he added. “It’s not so crazy anymore.”

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Old May 5th, 2007, 07:58 AM   #910
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what is the problem in Brooklyn, can nothing develop?
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Old May 5th, 2007, 08:08 AM   #911
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But the last one is a nice proyect!!! i like it...
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Old May 8th, 2007, 01:32 AM   #912
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Wow amazing projects! NYC just keeps on booming!
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Old May 8th, 2007, 03:31 AM   #913
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Omar View Post
what is the problem in Brooklyn, can nothing develop?
What do you mean that there is noting being developed or being built in Brooklyn? The downtown area has several new buildings being built. Those pics from Forgotten NY show that there are new buildings. BTW, I insist that you go over to Brownstoner for Brooklyn projects, though the blogger doesn't support all these projects.
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Old May 9th, 2007, 12:16 AM   #914
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Westside mega skyscrapers! This project will be HUGE.
It totally blocks out the Empire State Building. The ESB won't be tallest in Midtown for long.
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Old May 9th, 2007, 02:46 AM   #915
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/05082007...ich_calder.htm
A $7.25M VIEW

PENTHOUSE IS STAR OF B'KLYN COMPLEX

By RICH CALDER


BREATHTAKING: Some lucky (and filthy rich) residents of the new 1 Brooklyn Bridge Park will have stunning vantages of Manhattan.





May 8, 2007 -- It's Brooklyn as you've never seen it and probably never will - unless you've got $7.25 million to spare for what is about to become the borough's priciest condo.

The flagship penthouse unit at 1 Brooklyn Bridge Park, along the Brooklyn Heights waterfront, will consist of a 4,638-square-foot triplex with breathtaking, 360-degree views of the Manhattan and Brooklyn skylines from inside a state-planned public park.

But only those with the deepest pockets need apply. The price tag for the luxury pad is nearly double that of the current record sales figure for a Brooklyn condo: $3.8 million shelled out for a penthouse at the Aurora in Williamsburg in January.

"It will even have a private elevator that goes up to a rooftop terrace so you really feel like 'king of the world,' " boasted Robert Levine, developer of the complex, which launched sales last week.

Levine's "sky house" will feature seven rooms, four bathrooms and state-of-the-art appliances, as well as access to luxury amenities off-limits to park visitors.

The complex - set amid 85 acres of future parkland - will include a fitness center, large garden, for-purchase riverfront cabanas and a golf simulator featuring 28 separate courses.

An on-site garage will hold 132 parking spaces that Levine plans to sell for more than $100,000 each, and several hundred other rental spaces that will be overseen by an outside vendor.

The building also will include 70,000 square feet of commercial space, which will eventually house a market, restaurants, sports stores and other establishments. Trendy stores, including Trader Joe's, have contacted the developer about the space, but no deals have been finalized.

In addition to the prize penthouse, the building will offer 448 more units, including loft apartments, town houses and other penthouses. The most costly units will offer the best waterfront views of Manhattan, the Statue of Liberty and Brooklyn, and the least expensive will face the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, protected by sound-resistant windows.

Prices start at $550,000, and buyers are expected to begin moving in by October - at least five years before the long-delayed park will be complete.

Park construction is set to begin this summer.

Contracts have already been drawn up for 70 of the units, including eight of the 26 penthouses. The developer is working off a 4,000-name waiting list.

This, despite the political muck the project is stuck in.

Brooklyn Bridge Park has been a political hot potato since project planners announced in December 2004 that more than 1,200 luxury condos would have to be included within the new green space to raise enough money to offset the park's estimated $15.2 million annual maintenance costs.

This sparked an uprising by grassroots groups who griped that the park will become nothing more than a fancy back yard for developers like Levine to profit off of.

[email protected]
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Old May 9th, 2007, 04:39 PM   #916
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebola View Post


Westside mega skyscrapers! This project will be HUGE.
It totally blocks out the Empire State Building. The ESB won't be tallest in Midtown for long.
have u more infos?
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Old May 10th, 2007, 03:51 AM   #917
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how old is that rendering?
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Old May 10th, 2007, 10:27 PM   #918
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I'm not exactly sure, but there are NO HEIGHT LIMITS!

Not official:



Anything is possible for Midtown! In a few weeks, we'll start to get info and maybe renderings and heights. There will be a plethora of supertalls by the ESB for sure!
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Old May 10th, 2007, 10:29 PM   #919
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wow!
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Old May 10th, 2007, 10:35 PM   #920
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One question ebola.

Should we take this project for real?????
I saw on Emporis alot of projects/towers unrealised/never built.

I am concerned that this is again nothing but hot air.

If this gets built it will be so awesome for NYCs skyline.I still hope for something in NYC over 600m.
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