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Old June 28th, 2007, 12:33 AM   #1021
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Alot of good positive news!
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Old June 28th, 2007, 01:45 AM   #1022
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I'm 99.9% sure that WTC Tower 5 is 750 feet tall, so:

WTC Tower 1: 1,776 feet tall
WTC Tower 2: 1,340 feet tall
WTC Tower 3: 1,255 feet tall
WTC Tower 4: 950 feet tall
WTC Tower 5: 750 feet tall
Seven WTC: 750 feet tall
GS Tower: 750 feet tall
Beekman Tower: over 850 feet tall
123 Washington: over 600 feet
111 Washington: over 600 feet
99 Church Street: over 600 feet
15 Will Street: 600 feet
50 West Street: over 800 feet tall
(?)80 South Street: 1,123 feet tall

All of those skyscrapers are being built in the same small area, and I'm sure I missed some. That's over a dozen skyscrapers all going up in the same area at the same time. Can't wait to see downtown in a few years.

Last edited by Ebola; June 28th, 2007 at 02:05 AM.
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Old June 28th, 2007, 02:23 AM   #1023
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebola View Post
....50 West Street: over 800 feet tall....
Where did you hear that 50 West Street is over 800 feet tall? That's an awesome building.
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Old June 28th, 2007, 04:30 AM   #1024
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I just took a stab at the height. It looks pretty damn tall. It has to be over 700 feet, that's for sure.



I think this is 123 or 111 Washington, which will be next to WTC Tower 5:

It looks nice and glassy. It will only add to the cluster.
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Old June 28th, 2007, 06:55 AM   #1025
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebola View Post
I just took a stab at the height. It looks pretty damn tall. It has to be over 700 feet, that's for sure.



I think this is 123 or 111 Washington, which will be next to WTC Tower 5:

It looks nice and glassy. It will only add to the cluster.
It's 123 Washington. I agree that it's nice!
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Old June 28th, 2007, 11:37 PM   #1026
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/27/re...=1&oref=slogin
Paving the Way for Hotels in Hell’s Kitchen

By JANE L. LEVERE
Published: June 27, 2007


Ruby Washington/The New York Times

A new hotel, the Vu, will open at 11th Avenue near 48th Street.


The pioneering San Francisco-based Kimpton Hotel and Restaurant Group, which worked its way eastward, is looking west again — this time to Hell’s Kitchen.

An originator of the boutique hotel concept, Kimpton manages two hotels in Manhattan: 70 Park Avenue and the Muse, at 130 West 46th Street. Next spring, it will open a new $125 million hotel with 222 guest rooms at 653 11th Avenue, entering an area of the Far West Side of Manhattan that is distant from any existing hotels.

Converting a 1930’s printing plant on the west side of the avenue between 47th Street and 48th Streets and adding three floors, Kimpton will create the Vu, called that because of its 360-degree unobstructed vistas of the Hudson River and New Jersey, facing west, and the Midtown Manhattan skyline, facing east.

Owned by Horizen Global, a Manhattan developer of residential buildings, the Vu is the first new Midtown hotel going up far to the west of Times Square. If it is successful — as many industry executives predict it will be — it could pave the way for other hotels in the neighborhood.

In fact, the Rockrose Development Corporation, which owns a 216,000-square-foot three-story industrial building at 660 12th Avenue, one block northwest of the Vu, which is now a Federal Express sorting center, has been talking to hotel developers for the last six months about leasing the 257,000 square feet of air rights above the building for construction of a hotel, said Patricia Dunphy, vice president.

The Vu is the latest step in Kimpton’s expansion plans. Founded by Bill Kimpton in 1981 with one hotel in San Francisco, it has gradually expanded eastward and into Canada, and today operates 43 hotels in 17 cities.

The company’s chief executive, Michael A. Depatie, has said he wants to double the company’s hotels by 2012, and increase its hotels in the New York market to 20 by 2017. In addition to the Vu, it will also manage a new 290-room hotel in a 50-story mixed-use tower at 839 Avenue of the Americas, at 30th Street. As yet unnamed, this hotel will be developed by the JD Carlisle Group and is to open in 2009.

According to Troy Furbay, Kimpton’s senior vice president for acquisitions and development, the company considers the New York metropolitan area “five, six or seven different markets.” He added: “We’re trying to put a hotel in every area. We’ve looked at Brooklyn a bit, maybe Hoboken and the Jersey City area.”

Although Mr. Furbay said Kimpton initially found Hell’s Kitchen “an odd location” for a hotel, he said it was won over by what it believes is its growth potential. He said that in recent years the neighborhood has attracted not only residential real estate development, but also grocery stores, bars and restaurants, migrating westward from Ninth Avenue.

Regret is another factor, he admitted. He said Kimpton looked at a site in what was then the remote meatpacking district five years ago, but decided against going in there; this later became the successful Gansevoort Hotel, at Ninth Avenue and 13th Street.

On the Far West Side of Midtown, “we were worried we’d make the same mistake twice,” he said. “We didn’t want to overlook an area where it wasn’t immediately obvious why there was no hotel there.”

The designer of the Vu’s interior is the Rockwell Group, which has worked on other Manhattan hotels — like the W New York and Carlton — but has never collaborated with Kimpton.

Rockwell is designing a hotel that will take advantage of the site and the configuration of the existing industrial building, which has oversize windows and high ceilings.

A three-story addition by the architect Carlos Zapata that is approximately half the size of the roof of the original building is being built atop the existing structure.

The new 15th floor will hold an 1,800-square-foot glass-enclosed bar — with 360-degree views of Manhattan and New Jersey and doors that can open in fair weather — as well as a 230-square-foot rectangular Jacuzzi for guests and decorative reflecting pool. A new 16th floor will contain six guest rooms, including a presidential suite, which will itself be connected by stairs to a new 17th-floor roof deck, with another, smaller Jacuzzi and views.

Ed Bakos, a principal of the Rockwell Group overseeing the Vu project, said 30 percent of the guest rooms will be junior-suite lofts; these will measure 40 feet long, which he said is eight feet longer than most New York hotel guest rooms, 11 ½-feet wide and more than 11 feet high. Nine-feet-high windows will be covered by sheer shades, also affording expansive views.

Kimpton executives are bullish about the Vu’s prospects, pointing to the strength of the overall New York hotel market — occupancies in the five boroughs in 2005 and 2006 were 85.9 percent and 85.1 percent, respectively, and are projected to rise to 86 percent this year — and of the Times Square area in particular.

A number of other new hotels will open in the next few years near Times Square, including two being built in Hell’s Kitchen by the McSam Hotel Group: a 198-room Holiday Inn Express at 505 West 43rd Street, and a 144-room hotel at 506 West 44th Street, both opening between 10th and 11th Avenues in the second or third quarter of 2009.

Donna Keren, vice president for policy and research for NYC & Company, the tourism marketing organization, is also upbeat about the Vu’s prospects.

She believes it will attract guests attending conventions at the enlarged space for midsize trade shows at Piers 92 and 94, between West 52nd Street and West 54th Street along the Hudson River, being redeveloped by the New York City Economic Development Corporation.

Already popular for design and fashion shows, this space will be a good fit with Kimpton, Ms. Keren suggested, since the company is known for being “stylish and cutting-edge.”
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Old June 29th, 2007, 12:23 AM   #1027
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Glenwood Stitches Together a Parcel in the Garment Center





Wednesday, June 27, 2007
by ROK88

Developer Glenwood Management Corp. has recently grabbed up a bunch of properties on West 37th and 38th Streets in the heart of the Garment Center. They're now demolishing some old-timey buildings there (including an ancient U.S. Post Office Garage from 1918) to make way for what will most likely be another one of Glenwood's elegantly luxurious (or is that luxuriously elegant?) rental towers. A resident of W. 38th who lives nearby was screaming bloody murder over at WiredNewYork the other day, wondering what the hell was going on. One of the Wired regulars did some digging into the NYC Department of Finance website and uncovered the Glenwood transactions. Not too much info on what is planned here. But one thing seems certain: With a combined footprint at the site of about 50,000 square feet this one is gonna be BIG.


Copyright © 2007 Curbed
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Old June 29th, 2007, 12:45 AM   #1028
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WHAT WILL BE...
WITH THOUSANDS OF NEW HOMES ON THE WAY, WILLIAMSBURG GROWS UP






By KATHERINE DYKSTRA
June 28, 2007

If Brooklyn's Williamsburg neighborhood were a person, it would be going through its awkward phase, transitioning from free-spirited adolescent into responsible adult and experiencing constant physical change. That change is coming in the form of a residential housing explosion.

"Everything from Driggs to the BQE is being rebuilt," says David Maundrell, president of real-estate firm Aptsandlofts.com.

That's to say nothing of the waterfront, which is sprouting high-rises like weeds. "Everything will be brand-new; it will be new building after new building," Maundrell says.

The crowded market is the result of the 2005 rezoning of Williamsburg and Greenpoint to include high-density residential construction. And it has been further spurred by the recent extension of the 421a tax abatement until July 2008, which will prompt more developers to build more buildings faster. Their goal: to get into the ground before the abatement expires - and with it their chance to save fistfuls on property taxes while offering buyers tax-abated units.

Granted, some of the proposed projects will likely end up languishing on their drafting tables, but if you've spent any time at all in Williamsburg over the past year, you're well aware that the times are a-changin'. Glassy low-rises have cropped up amid aluminum-sided houses; warehouses and factories are giving way to modern condo buildings; construction - scaffolding, cranes, craters in the ground - is everywhere.

"We represent 90-something new projects that are coming on the market," says Maundrell. "Some are eight units; some more than 100."

Williamsburg has come a long way. In the early 1990s, the area was industrial warehouses. It was desolate. It was dangerous to walk around alone at night. Then in the mid-to-late '90s, artists seeking affordability turned those warehouses into homes/studios/venues, and with them came an artsy, low-maintenance vibe, a sense of community. No, you couldn't get all the groceries you wanted or go to a drugstore nearby, but you could buy a giant Styrofoam cup of beer for two bucks, go to a local artist's opening and drink wine for free or see an up-and-coming band perform in an intimate venue for $5.

Michael Moshan, who moved to Williamsburg five years ago remebers the grittier, cheaper version of the neighborhood well.

When Moshan moved to Havemeyer and Hope streets, "that area was the frontier because it bordered on the south side," he says. "At that time, there was nothing there. There was [bar/performance space] Black Betty and that was it."

As word got out that interesting things were happening in Williamsburg and, even better, that the rent was cheap, Manhattanites migrated, college grads moved in and the area became a hipster haven. It was both loathed and loved for this (think electroclash and trucker hats). But over time, the rents began to climb and developers caught wind. A condo was built and bingo, it sold out like a Yeah Yeah Yeahs show. A market was discovered, and everything changed.

"Five years ago, they developed a group of townhouse apartments for $400 a square foot, and they sold out very quickly," says Prudential Douglas Elliman broker Helene Luchnick. "Then every developer who owned property or could buy property did so and began to develop."

As luxury condos begin to outnumber indie rockers and artists, some of the pioneers - those who made Williamsburg Williamsburg - have been forced to relocate in order to find lower rent. Galapagos Art Space, an independent venue that opened in 1995 and was known for its eclectic offerings (an experimental film festival one night, a guy with a guitar the next), has chosen to leave Williamsburg rather than suffer an increase in rent. It's relocating to DUMBO.

"The rents have gone up hundreds of percent. The same thing happened in SoHo, in every neighborhood that's ever been gentrified," says Luchnick. "The people who gentrified the neighborhood are the ones who end up getting hurt in the end."

But for the unfortunate loss of every scrappy performance space, Williamsburg is also seeing much-needed positive development.

"They're taking the weird nail salons and boarded-up buildings and turning them into something interesting," says Moshan. "Every week it seems that something else that's interesting or delicious or fun is opening up around us."

Though buildings are cropping up all over Williamsburg, there are definite construction hubs where three, four and sometimes more projects are rising seemingly as one.

"McCarren Park, the waterfront, and the North Seventh Street corridor, because of the L train, are the best locations," says Eric Mann, one of the founders of the Developers Group, a real-estate sales and marketing team.

Adjacent to the newly renovated park - all rising right in a row - are Ikon, weighing in with 48 units; Aurora, with 51; and Number 20 Bayard, with 62, which at 18 stories is the tallest building in North Williamsburg. Also coming up in the vicinity are the eight-story Loftology, with half- and full-floor lofts, at Driggs and Leonard streets; North 11th and Roebling, with 131 units; and Aqua, with 55 Andres Escobar-designed apartments.

The true behemoths can be found along the water where the city has promised to build a riverfront park. Waterfront projects include The Edge, 575 units in two towers; One Northside Piers, an 180-unit glass tower and the first phase of a larger development; 111 Kent Avenue, seven stories and 68,000 square feet of residential space.; and North 8, with 40 units.

"Just on the waterfront there are more than 1,000 apartments to come," says Christine Blackburn, of the Barak/Blackburn Group, a Williamsburg-based Prudential Douglas Elliman entity.

Other condos are popping up near the heart of Williamsburg, on Bedford near the L stop, with its concentration of boutiques, bars and restaurants. The Sofia, a conversion of a bakery once owned by a woman named, yes, Sofia, at 234 N. Ninth St., at Roebling Street, will include 13 lofts. There's also Urban Green, at 142 N. Sixth St., between Bedford and Berry streets, with 44 units, and Roebling Square, where all 36 units have sold out despite the fact that the building is a walk-up (getting someone to walk up to their penthouse has to be a trick).

While projects like the Sofia, where units start at $650 a square foot, seem reasonably priced when compared to what's available in Manhattan, Williamsburg real estate is becoming more and more competitive. 111 Kent Avenue is expected to average $900-plus a square foot, and Number 20 Bayard is averaging $850. Manhattan-style luxe amenities like pools and gyms are helping drive up prices.

Nevertheless, these new units are selling. In the two weeks since Number 20 Bayard started sales, 25 percent of the units have sold. The Lucent, with 28 one- and two-bedrooms on Bedford Avenue, sold out in three weeks. It seems Williamsburg has gone from inexpensive Manhattan alternative to a destination people are willing to pay prime prices for.

"Almost everyone is coming, not because they are priced out of Manhattan, but because they want to," says Lior Barak, of Barak/ Blackburn Group. "Which is completely different than it was a few years ago."

"The two main markets are creative professionals, not the artists that got Williamsburg to this point, but people in design, fashion, music," says Maundrell, "and financial professionals, attorneys, bankers. The catch with them is that a lot of them have a creative side. They may be painters or in a band."

When it came time for Moshan, an attorney who indeed plays in a band, and his wife, Shana Liebman, an editor and writer, to look for more space, they opted to stay in the area.

"I was considering Manhattan - Hell's Kitchen, the East Village and the Lower East Side - but for me, Williamsburg was still connected with downtown Manhattan, and it offered something more artistic, more exciting," says Moshan. He had paid $490 a square foot for an apartment in 2003, sold it for $730 a square foot last year and moved to Roebling Square.

Despite an increase in young couples and families, there is a limit to the growth, as Moshan sees it.

"I don't know how far Williamsburg can grow," he says. "The public schools here are abysmal."

And even with the increase in residences, boutiques, bars and people, there is still no major grocery store in the vicinity (FreshDirect is the mantra of the Williamsburg broker), and the L line is constantly packed shoulder to shoulder.

"I like the restaurants, the space, the vibe, [that] there's a lot of neighborhood pride and young people pursuing their passions," says Liebman. "But I hate that there's no good grocery shopping. It's easier to find cool earrings than fresh fruit."

Fingers are crossed that one of the mega-developments on the waterfront will end up housing a Whole Foods or another large chain grocery store. And the L train has been the first subway line to go automated, proof that the city is paying attention to Williamsburg's needs.

"Four or five years ago, people were looking for deals and there were hopes that the neighborhood would grow into something," says Moshan. "And now that has happened."

"We used to go to Sweetwater, which was a cool punk bar, back in 1997, to drink cheap beer. Now it's a restaurant that serves seared tuna and good wine," says Liebman. "I'm not exactly complaining, though."


Copyright 2007 NYP Holdings, Inc.
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Old July 1st, 2007, 02:30 AM   #1029
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/01/re...te&oref=slogin
Pei Designs a Condo in Midtown

By C. J. HUGHES
Published: July 1, 2007


SABO

A Stone Cascade Rendering of a new condo going up at 33 West 56th Street, designed by I. M. Pei, whose credits include the glass pyramid at the Louvre.


THE architect Richard Meier has designed a few. So has Jean Nouvel. Even Philip Johnson managed to add one to the New York skyline, albeit posthumously.

Now I. M. Pei gets to design one too — a luxury Manhattan condominium building.

Mr. Pei, whose architectural credits include the glass pyramid at the Louvre in Paris, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and the Javits Convention Center and Four Seasons Hotel in Manhattan, is the architect for the Centurion, at 33 West 56th Street.

Mr. Pei has designed the building, a 17-story high-rise, to taper upward from a squared base through a series of gradual curves to a narrow top. He said that the setbacks were required — under the neighborhood’s zoning, only the lowest 85 feet of the outside wall can be flush with the property line on the front of the building — but he decided that the structure did not have to resemble a sharply tiered wedding cake.

“The face will have more distinction with a cascade of stone, rather than steps,” he said. “You don’t have to be big to be beautiful.”

The Centurion’s 48 condo apartments will range in size from one to four bedrooms and 750 to 3,400 square feet. There will be three penthouses. Prices are expected to go from $1.9 million to $10 million, said Robbie Antonio, managing director of Antonio Development, the co-developer with Stillman Development International. Both are based in Manhattan.

Construction began in March and occupancy is expected in December 2008. Sales have begun at Stillman’s offices, at 505 Park Avenue, at 59th Street; a formal sales office has not yet opened.

The setback rule allows 13 of the units to have terraces. The interiors, designed by SLCE Architects of Manhattan, feature 31 layouts, with teak floors and glass countertops. Five units will have 17-foot ceilings.

The building’s exterior will be clad in Burgundy limestone, which has a yellower hue than the grayish Indiana limestone found in many New York buildings. The design calls for a wide lobby with a rear wall that overlooks a private courtyard and a waterfall. There are to be no street-level stores.

The Centurion is Mr. Pei’s first residential project in Manhattan in many decades. One of his last was the 1966 Silver Towers complex (also known as University Plaza) of New York University, at Bleecker Street and La Guardia Place.
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Old July 1st, 2007, 06:28 AM   #1030
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Williamsburg is indeed changing if not changed from what it was. Id definitly hate to see too much glass in the neighborhood. Hopefully not all warehouses get cleared, i'd hate to see some brick buildings go...
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Old July 2nd, 2007, 05:12 AM   #1031
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Williamsburg is hardly a slum or ghetto to begin with.
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Old July 4th, 2007, 01:34 AM   #1032
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Construction, Sales Begin at NYC Hilton Club





June 29, 2007
By Adam Perrotta, News Writer

Hilton Grand Vacations Co. has broken ground on what will be the first ever ground-up residential timeshare property in New York City. The development, West 57th Street by Hilton Club, is slated to complete in 2009, and will include 161 studio, one-bedroom and penthouse suites within a 28-story building.

Sales of the units have also begun, with one-week ownership increments available starting at $41,000 for the studios, and ranging up to $100,000 per week for the penthouses.

"We're very excited to bring the next generation of residential shared ownership to New York City," said Hilton Grand Vacations president & CEO Antoine Dagot, Dagot identified buyers who want a part-time residence in the city without the hassles of owning an additional home as the development's target market. "Ownership at West 57th Street offers the most flexible way to own a pied-a-terre in the city without the concerns of second home ownership," Dagot noted.

West 57th Street by Hilton Club was designed architecturally by HLW International, with interior design handled by Alexandra Champalimaud & Associates. The project will also include a Spa Chakra--the first in the city--located at street level. The property will be located in Manhattan's Plaza district, near attractions such as Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, MOMA, Central Park and shopping along Fifth Avenue.


© 2007 Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
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Old July 4th, 2007, 01:39 AM   #1033
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With Doors Open to Neighbors, N.Y.U. Shapes Plan for Growth





By KAREN W. ARENSON
July 2, 2007

New York University and Greenwich Village seem woven into each other. The geographic location has been a powerful lure for students and faculty, the school a steady source of youth, commerce and intellectual vitality for the neighborhood.

But some who live there year in and year out have complained that the university’s expansion was helter-skelter and its buildings ugly and enormous, and that both were ruining the Village.

Now the university, more popular than ever among the nation’s high school seniors, says it will need about 6 million more square feet over the next 25 years, at least some of it in the Greenwich Village area.

So last week it held an open house, though not for prospective students. For five hours, about 300 people, mostly local residents, sipped punch and sparkling wine, examined poster boards describing N.Y.U. and its needs, and chatted with university officials and their architects about where the university was headed.

The reception was part of a planning process that the university says would shape its growth more deliberately, give the community more say — and, it hopes, make the expansion more palatable.

“We have to see if people can come up with creative ways to help the university and the community,” said John E. Sexton, N.Y.U.’s president. “It should be a win-win situation, not a zero-sum game.”

The university also began working last year with a task force of community leaders and elected officials, headed by the Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer. In April, it hired a team of architecture and design firms to shape a strategic plan that includes community input. And on Thursday, it held the open house for community members, to discuss N.Y.U.’s needs and to hear their views.

As a symbol of the new openness, the heavy outer doors of Hemmerdinger Hall, the airy, high-ceilinged room on Washington Square East where the reception was held, were opened for the first time in more than a decade, providing access directly from the street. But a locksmith had to be summoned because no one could find a working key.

Many of the visitors welcomed the university’s promise of more transparency, although many remained skeptical.

“Just the fact that they’re having this meeting is a big step in the right direction,” said Sara Jones, chairwoman of LaGuardia Corner Community Gardens, a city-sponsored garden in N.Y.U.’s midst. “We are concerned about N.Y.U.’s expansion. We’d just like to know what’s going on.”

Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, also said he was encouraged but was afraid to be too optimistic. “I’ve been burned by the university a few times, where they’ve made promises they haven’t kept,” he said. “I’m hoping this time will be different.”

Some also expressed frustration that N.Y.U.’s new planning process will not affect several projects already under way, including a 26-story residence hall being built on East 12th Street, on the site of the former St. Ann’s Church. N.Y.U. has agreed to lease and then buy the building, said Alicia D. Hurley, associate vice president for government and community affairs at N.Y.U.

“A 26-story dorm on a side street in the East Village is inexcusable,” Mr. Berman said.

Town-gown relations have always been problematic, and real estate has been especially contentious in recent years, as research universities feel competitive pressures to expand. Columbia, for example, has been trying to add about 17 acres just north of its Morningside Heights campus in Manhattan, and has faced resistance from local residents and property owners.

With more than 40,000 students and 3,100 full-time faculty members, N.Y.U. is one of the largest private universities in the United States, but one with no clearly defined campus. To the consternation of many of its neighbors, it sprawls in a scattershot way across Greenwich Village and other areas, and keeps expanding. It uses about 15 million square feet, two-thirds of that in the Village and in nearby neighborhoods like the East Village and Union Square.

In the last decade, part of its growth has come from leasing space for uses like student housing. And the university envisions that its student body will grow to 46,500 students within 25 years. One of N.Y.U.’s greatest areas of planned expansion is for student housing. It currently owns 2 million square feet of undergraduate housing and leases an additional 1.3 million square feet, but its plan calls for owning 4.3 million square feet by 2031.

Mr. Sexton, N.Y.U.’s president, said growth comes with new programs. He said N.Y.U. was likely to add an engineering program, as well as others, in the next 25 years.

The president chatted amiably with numerous visitors at the reception on Thursday. He acknowledged that relationships with the community had been mixed, but said that he was determined to change that. An important step, he said, was a strategic plan that took into account the views of those at N.Y.U. as well as community members nearby.

“Once you get past that very small minority who as a matter of conviction are against growth at all, and the very small group of people who attack N.Y.U. for political purposes,” he added, “then you just have to ask people to have a genuine dialogue and not just say, ‘Not in my back yard.’ ”

N.Y.U. recently selected a consortium of four firms — SMWM, Toshiko Mori, Grimshaw Architects and Olin Partnership — to work on its planning. Lynne P. Brown, a senior vice president at N.Y.U., says the planning will cost about $4 million over several years. In recent weeks, the designers have met with N.Y.U. officials and with each other. It was the design team that urged the university to open the heavy wood doors of Hemmerdinger for the reception.

They said there was no model of how a land-starved university like N.Y.U. could expand without making too many waves, but were optimistic that they would find solutions.

“When you have a tough problem, you can find different ways of thinking about it when you have good minds at the table,” said Karen B. Alschuler, a principal at SMWM, based in San Francisco. “We can’t promise that everyone will be happy,” she added. “But the result will be better architecture and better design.”

Toshiko Mori, chairwoman of the architecture department at Harvard University, said she could already see opportunities for using the current space more effectively. “Their use of existing space is not very efficient,” she said. “There is a lot you can do with scheduling and having more general use classrooms.”

The planning team will also be working with N.Y.U. to find spots for expansion outside the Village. University officials are talking about having more “branch” or “regional” campuses, both locally and in places like Paris; they also aim to have half of their students spend a semester abroad, up from a quarter now.

Another source of discipline will come from the community task force on N.Y.U. development, which includes a congressman, Jerrold L. Nadler; the speaker of the City Council, Christine C. Quinn, whose district includes the West Village; state legislators and a variety of local community leaders; as well as Mr. Stringer, the borough president.

In a letter to Mr. Sexton in November, the task force said that reducing tensions over the university’s expansion “is only possible if the community is given an opportunity to comment on and participate in N.Y.U. planning efforts, and if the university is willing to truly listen to and take into account the public’s concerns.”

Mr. Stringer said he knew people were skeptical but he believed the task force could make a difference.

“N.Y.U.’s president has showed up for task force meetings and stayed till the end, and that’s a sea change in itself,” he said, “to have the president across from the community, in front of all the elected officials.”


Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
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Old July 4th, 2007, 01:48 AM   #1034
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The sky’s the limit (at least in this picture)





By Dana Rubinstein
June 30 – July 7, 2007

Here’s the latest rendering of a proposed $750-million revamp of the Gallery at Fulton Mall. Plans for a 45- to 60-story tower — only hinted at in this rendering — now call for 70 fewer units of below-market-rate housing and 300 fewer jobs than previously proposed.

The mall, bordered by DeKalb Avenue, Flatbush Avenue Extension and Willoughby Street, has been a hot potato since the city upzoned Downtown Brooklyn in 2004 and sent real-estate prices soaring.

Acadia Realty Trust and McFarlane Partners purchased the site from developer Joe Sitt in February for $125 million. Sitt had paid $25 million three years earlier.


©2007 The Brooklyn Paper
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Old July 4th, 2007, 01:57 AM   #1035
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NYC Approves 880,000-SF Village





By Natalie Dolce
July 2, 2007

NEW YORK CITY-The city has given approval for Boricua Village, a 4.5-acre educational, commercial and residential community in the Melrose section of the Bronx. With groundbreaking expected to occur in September, the 880,000-sf development is said to be the most ambitious community revitalization initiative in recent years by parties involved in the project.

The development, slated for a 2009 completion, is jointly sponsored by locally based Atlantic Development Group LLC and Boricua College, a liberal arts school with locations in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

With approximately 750 residential units, 50,000 sf of retail space as well as a 14-story building that will house a new Bronx flagship location for Boricua College
, the project will be part of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s 165,000-unit affordable housing plan.

According to the spokesperson for the project, the deal has been in the works since 2005, and though construction costs and other financial information have not yet been finalized, loose ends expect to be complete by groundbreaking.

The site, which now consists of city-owned vacant lots, will include landscaping, benches and public areas as well as its other components. The residential component’s seven buildings will range in height from six to 13 stories and will be comprised of studios, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments. A large portion of the units will be reserved for low-income residents and the rest will be rented for those of moderate income.

“Boricua Village will set a new standard for urban community life by providing Bronx residents with an exciting place to learn, to live and to shop,” says Peter Fine, principal of Atlantic Development Group.

The project is expected to encompass 878,857 gross sf of floor area, with 120,000 sf alone in the college tower. “This urban village will be a thriving bicultural community centered on the value of education,” says Dr. Victor Alicea, president and founder of Boricua College, in a statement.


Copyright © 2007 ALM Properties, Inc.
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Old July 4th, 2007, 02:00 AM   #1036
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U.N. CONDOS W/ VIEW


By STEVE CUOZZO
July 3, 2007

SOME property sales are more interesting on paper than in the real world - but definitely not in that category is a just completed deal, which has implications for all involved in it and for its neighborhood.

Developer Harry Macklowe just sold 10 UN Plaza, a/k/a 823 First Ave., to Eyal Ofer's Global Holdings and William Lie Zeckendorf and Arthur Zeckendorf for $160 million, we've learned.

The buyers are the same team behind 15 Central Park West, the breakthrough, twin-towered project that brought super-luxe apartments to the big site just north of Time Warner Center that was long home to the Mayflower Hotel and an empty lot.

The 10 UN Plaza site - on the west side of First Avenue between East 46th and 47th streets - now holds the remnants of a two-story building being demolished.

There, the Zeckendorfs plan a 242,000 square-foot, "super high-end luxury condominium" tower with "spectacular, open vistas," William Zeckendorf said.

Sources said it will likely rise 40 stories or more.

Studley Capital Transactions Group chief Woody Heller, with the group's Will Silverman and David Endelman, represented Macklowe Properties and brought in the buyers.

Heller called the 20,000 square-foot site facing the UN Sculpture Garden and bordering Dag Hammerskjold Plaza "one of the most exciting development sites in Manhattan."

The inexhaustibly prolific Macklowe bought the land in late 2005 for $101 million. He said, "While this is a project we had anticipated developing ourselves, Will and Arthur's enthusiasm convinced us to consider selling it. We are confident they'll create a beautiful and very successful building."

Heller said the Zeckendorfs "pre-empted" other bids when they swooped in two weeks after the land went on the market and closed on it in 30 days.

The new owners will likely build just as swiftly, because they must have a foundation in place by the end of the year to qualify for the city's 421-A real estate tax abatement program.

Coincidentally, the buyers' 15 Central Park West is next door to Donald Trump's Trump Hotel and Tower, just as its new First Avenue site is next door to Trump World Tower.

South-facing residents of the latter can expect to have views blocked by their new neighbor.

The sale will surely fuel recent buzz, reported yesterday in The Wall Street Journal, that Harry and Billy Macklowe might also sell some of the eight Manhattan office buildings they bought from Blackstone this year to "ease refinancing" of the $7 billion purchase.

But a source familiar with 10 UN Plaza said its sale had mostly to do with the fact that the Macklowes just have too many development projects on their plate at once - including major new office towers at 510 Madison Ave. and at the former Drake Hotel site.


Copyright 2007 NYP Holdings, Inc.
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Old July 4th, 2007, 02:01 AM   #1037
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BREAKING: Scope Plan for 'The New Domino' Revealed!


Tuesday, July 3, 2007
by Lockhart




Just when you think it's safe to drift into the July 4th holiday, comes this: the first renderings of what the developers want to build on the site of the Domino Sugar Plant on the Williamsburg waterfront. In three letters, OMG. The images come our way via the draft scope document that's just been posted over at the Department of City Planning, and what it portends for this section of the East River waterfront—a site that developers The Refinery LLC are calling The New Domino—is, in essence, more of the same of what's happening up the coast from here: the construction of towering residential buildings, nine in total along the waterfront with two over 400 feet in height, and two over 300 feet in height. As a scope document, the renderings aren't anything more than placeholders for the (surely oh-so-glassy!) architecture to follow, but does give a view of how the developers would like to populate the site.

As for the Domino Refinery building itself, which is under consideration for Landmarks designation, it would undergo some sort of rehabilitation (assuming the landmarking is green-lighted) for some sort of as-yet uncertain residential/retail/community use, as it becomes enclosed by new residential towers. One crucial note: the developers hope to add floors to the main Refinery building, whether or not it gets landmarked. From what we can gather from the scope document, the iconic Domino Sugar sign—and its building that's always looked to us like a giant sugar box—would be demolished, as would all other structures on the site, several of which are also getting a Landmarks push from preservationists.



Above, courtesy of the Waterfront Preservation Alliance, a view of the Domino Sugar site as it sits now. The site has been unused since 2004, when the current developers acquired it. The scope document indicates that the developers plan to preserve the sizable central Processing House (which they'll likely be required to do by landmarking), but knock down the Adant House adjacent to the Williamsburg Bridge. The future of the small Power House, adjacent to the front of the Processing House, is uncertain.



Above, from the scope document, is the proposed rezone. The key detail here is that the proposed rezoning for much of the Domino site—R-8—matches most of the rest of the Williamsburg waterfront to the north.





These here are the East and West Elevations of the entire scope plan. To understand better what's going on here, let's go to the scope document:


PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

If approved, the proposed actions would allow for the construction of up to 9 new residential structures along four of the waterfront blocks between Grand Avenue and South 5th Street and up to 6 new residential structures on the upland block east of Kent Avenue between South 3rd and South 4th Streets. The buildings along Kent Avenue would range in height from approximately 50 to 100 feet. Two of the buildings along the waterfront would reach heights of 300 feet and two would reach 400 feet. The buildings on the upland portion of the site east of Kent Avenue would rise to a maximum height of 90 feet along Kent Avenue and 140 feet elsewhere on the lot.

The three buildings which together comprise The Refinery and which are located on the central block of the development between South 2nd and South 3rd Streets, would be reused and converted to some combination of residential, retail/commercial, and community facility uses. As noted above, the program for the reuse of the Refinery building has not been finalized. The project sponsor anticipates adding floors to a portion of the roof of the Refinery building to assist in meeting the project’s goals and objectives as discussed below in “Project Goals and Objectives”. If the Refinery is designated by the LPC, the project sponsor would have to apply to the LPC for a Certificate of Appropriateness for any addition or modification to the exterior of the Refinery. Ground floor retail/commercial uses would be located along both sides of Kent Avenue. Publicly accessible open space, including an esplanade along the waterfront that would connect to Grand Ferry Park to the north of the site, would be constructed as part of the proposed project, as required by the Zoning Resolution.

Additional open space beyond what is required by zoning would be developed between the Refinery building and the waterfront.

It is anticipated that the development would be served by water taxi service. Shuttle bus service would also be provided to carry passengers from the proposed development to nearby subway stations.

The scope document is a long read, 44 pages in total, so if you've got some free time, download the PDF, give it a read, and post any salient details we've missed in the comment thread below. We'll follow up on any promising leads.

Domino Draft Scope of Work Document [nyc.gov]


Copyright © 2007 Curbed
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Old July 4th, 2007, 09:35 PM   #1038
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Anyone recall that? I was looking at old stuff. I shouldn't be long before we may see another tower that size come by.
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Old July 4th, 2007, 10:35 PM   #1039
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impressive news!!
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Old July 6th, 2007, 05:11 PM   #1040
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Last edited by DesignerVoodoo; July 6th, 2007 at 05:24 PM. Reason: awnsered question myself
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