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Old July 11th, 2007, 01:33 AM   #1041
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Update of the Oro Condos from Forgotten NY.



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Old July 11th, 2007, 11:21 PM   #1042
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nice tower, never seen it before
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Old July 13th, 2007, 03:50 AM   #1043
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/07112007...lois_weiss.htm
ROOSEVELT'S UP FOR SALE AT COOL $1B

July 11, 2007 -- NO sooner did we whis per the Roosevelt Hotel as being a potential development site last Friday then we were tipped that it was actually coming to market - and could sell for, gulp, $1 billion as an office development site. Just over a year ago, the Pakistani government, which owns the 1,013 room hotel as PIA Investments, bought out its 50/50 Saudi partner, Prince Faisal bin Khalid of Saudi Arabia.

Infighting and Pakistani political factionalism stopped an earlier sales effort in 2003 that would have brought in around $225 million slated to be used to purchase new jets for its airline.

Sources said Cushman & Wakefield will be marking the hotel through its Fab Foursome: Richard Baxter, Ron Cohen, Scott Latham and Jon Caplan. The company declined comment.

At a breakfast meeting at Michael's yesterday morning, C&W executives were bullish on the ongoing sales and leasing markets, as vacancy rates have dropped to 5.3 percent and asking rents are up to $75.79 a foot in Midtown, a 35 percent jump since this time last year.

The hotel occupies nearly a full-acre block just north of Grand Central Terminal bounded by 45th and 46th Streets, Vanderbilt and Madison avenues.

Its 43,000 foot site can be built to 800,000 feet as-of-right, but attorneys say that special district air rights can be piled on to create a skyscraper that could leap to 1.5 million feet.

Potential bidders are being advised to compare the hotel to the site next to the Museum of Modern Art which sold for $775 a buildable foot, but is mid-block near Sixth Avenue.

Over a number of years making strategic land and air rights purchases, Macklowe Properties paid around $950 a foot for the Swisshotel Drake New York at Park Avenue and 56th Street, which they have changed from a residential hotel to offices.

Office rents have since climbed markedly in the city with 18 deals completed at over $125 a foot this year alone versus 16 in all of last year.
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Old July 13th, 2007, 04:06 AM   #1044
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Old July 14th, 2007, 01:33 AM   #1045
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/10/nyregion/10ink.html
The Unofficial Attendant of an Ad Hoc Parking Lot

By ETHAN WILENSKY-LANFORD
Published: July 10, 2007


Oscar Hidalgo/The New York Times

John Harte tends to cars that park on a vacant lot in Long Island City, Queens.



Oscar Hidalgo/The New York Times

Some drivers park themselves; others let Mr. Harte park or move their cars. He does not charge anyone, but he accepts gratuities.


JOHN HARTE awoke early, before the first car rolled onto his lot in Queens at 6:30 on a recent Monday morning.

He does not own the barren lot in Long Island City, but tends to it as if he does. He was wearing a frayed straw hat with a blue plastic sheriff’s badge.

“I don’t charge anybody,” he said. “It’s gratuity they give me: $2, $3, $4.” Down the street, another private parking lot charged $12 for the day.

In the lot, under a billboard on the corner of Vernon Boulevard and Borden Avenue, Mr. Harte, 71, is home. “I have a car-iminium, a van-aminium and a white house,” he said, pointing at a rusted car and two broken-down vans, one white, where he sleeps.

The blocks around him are sprouting high-rise condominiums like trees. A bagel shop just opened a block away, opposite a crumbling wall with fading paint that reads Cangro Transmission Co. Inc., a testament to the neighborhood’s industrial past.

It is here, on a paved lot big enough for about eight vehicles and next to a construction site, that Mr. Harte squeezes out a meager livelihood. He said he saved a spot every morning for a construction manager who works nearby. In return, the manager has given him food, a few dollars and his business card. Mr. Harte said he hoped the man might even install electricity.

Not all of Mr. Harte’s customers pay in cash. “This car here, I just watch it for him,” Mr. Harte said, pointing to a black Camry. “When he cooks sometimes, he gives me dinner.”

His little spot could soon become more popular. Some commuters already like to park in Long Island City and take the subway to Manhattan. Already, cars park in the median on Vernon Boulevard in front of Mr. Harte’s ad hoc parking business. Should Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s plan to charge people driving in Manhattan south of 86th Street come to fruition, Long Island City and Mr. Harte’s services may be more in demand.

As he spoke, a man drove up in a souped-up Honda Civic and parked near a small green sport utility vehicle, whose driver had paid Mr. Harte $3. Dwayne A. Gilmore, 20, the Civic’s driver, paid $2 in quarters.

“That’s my buddy, right there,” said Mr. Gilmore, 20, of Far Rockaway, Queens. Once, Mr. Harte said, Mr. Gilmore had given him five new pairs of shoes.

For now, the money he gets is small change. “When I get it, I go get coffee, have breakfast,” Mr. Harte said. “It’s not a lot.”
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Old July 18th, 2007, 09:50 AM   #1046
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Columbus Village will have 710 units in five buildings





10-JUL-07

PWV Acquisitions, of which Joseph Chetrit of the Chetrit Group and Laurence Gluck of Stellar Management, are principals, has decided to name its redevelopment of some properties at Park West Village on the Upper West Side Columbus Village.

They bought the complex between 97th and 100th Streets west of Central Park West in 2000 for about $122 million from Helmsley-Spear Inc. The complex was erected in 1961 and was designed by S.J. Kessler & Sons and consists of seven red-brick slab towers of which four are condominiums and three are rentals.

The developers are planning to add five new residential buildings with a total of about 710 apartments, all set back on two-story bases, to the complex. Four of the new buildings will be on Columbus Avenue and one on Amsterdam Avenue.

Marketing of the retail space in the first new building planned for the site at 808 Columbus Avenue has recently begun and Whole Foods will be a major retail tenant. That building will be 30 stories high, a dozen or so stories taller than the existing residential buildings in the complex and it will have a garage.

According to the Department of Buildings, Costas Kondylis & Partners is the architect for 808 Columbus Avenue, a 30-story building with 359 apartments, and for three other new buildings across the avenue, a 12-story building with 56 apartments at 775 Columbus Avenue on the northeast corner at 97th Street, a 15-story building with 132 apartments at 795 Columbus Avenue between 98th and 99th Streets, and a 14-story building with 63 apartments at 805 Columbus Avenue on the southeast corner at 100th Street.

The fifth new building is a 15-story building with 100 apartments at 801 Amsterdam Avenue at 100th Street. It is being designed by SCLE.

The buildings are planned for completion late next year.

Whereas the balconied buildings of the original complex were typical "towers-in-a-park" structures of similar size and shape, the new buildings differ in height, facade treatment and color and they have setbacks and corner windows.

The new buildings will have a unified architecture style on Columbus Avenue and represent another substantial transformation of that area, which is not far from two taller residential towers nearing completion by Extell Development on Broadway between 99th and 100th Streets.

The new buildings on the east side of Columbus Avenue will have covered walkways between them to provide easy access to the avenue from the rest of the complex to the east.

The covered walkways will also serve to create a continuous two-story high building wall between 97th and 100th Streets on that side of the avenue.

There are subway stations nearby on 96th Street and Central Park West and Broadway and there is good cross-town bus service on 96th Street.

Martin J. McLaughlin, a spokesman for The Chetrit Group, told CityRealty.Com today he did not know how many of the new units might be condominiums and how many might be rentals, but said he would try to find out.


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Old July 18th, 2007, 09:50 AM   #1047
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Florida developer plans Ground Zero-area hotel



The buildings at 133
Greenwich have been
demolished.



By Gabby Warshawer
July 17, 2007

Boca Raton-based E.B. Developers plans to build a hotel next to Ground Zero in Lower Manhattan. The firm recently purchased a development site at 133 Greenwich Street from the Cooper Group for $45 million, according to public records.

The Cooper Group, a consortium of Israeli-based investors, purchased 133 Greenwich for $20 million in 2005 and announced it would construct a 30-story condo on the site, which was formerly home to two low-rise buildings.

E.B. said its plans for a hotel rather than a condo on the 91,635-buildable-square-foot parcel make sense given Ground Zero's heavy foot traffic and the fact that the site is a draw for tourists.

"We're going to build a luxury-plus hotel there," said Michael Scheiner, a vice president at E.B. "Over 5 million people a year are expected to visit the site."

E.B.'s hotel will overlook the memorial park at Ground Zero and face the tower JPMorgan Chase intends to build.

Scheiner said the hotel will be "the first of many entries for E.B. into the New York market." The firm has been building residential properties in Florida for 17 years and has developed hotels in Orlando.

E.B. has retained Jones Lang LaSalle Hotels as its adviser on the project, which will likely rise slightly higher than the 30 stories that the Cooper Group had planned. An operator for the property has yet to be chosen, but Scheiner said "there are a hundred names interested, including your Starwoods, your InterContinentals, your Le Meridiens."

Scheiner said that though a groundbreaking date has yet to be set, the development is "on the fast track."


Copyright © 2003-2007 The Real Deal.
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Old July 18th, 2007, 09:51 AM   #1048
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Marketing starts for the Azure at 331 East 91st Street





16-JUL-07

Marketing has started for Azure, a 32-story residential condominium building at 331 East 91st Street, which also has the address of 1765 First Avenue.
It is part of a mixed-use project that will include a 520-seat Middle School 114 that is being developed by the city's Educational Construction Fund.

The DeMatteis Organization is the developer and James Davidson of SCLE Architects is the designer of the tower.

The building will have 128 apartments, according to documents on file with the Department of Buildings.

Prices for 601-sq.ft. studio units begin at $575,000. One-bedroom apartments with 1,006 square feet are priced initially from $995,000, two-bedroom units with 1,428 square feet from $1,450,000, three-bedroom apartments with 1,811 square feet from $2,042,500, four-bedroom apartments with 2,246 square feet from $3,618,000, five-bedroom units with 2,867 square feet from $4,288,250 and penthouses with 2,686 square feet from $5,500,000.

The building will have some balconies and a 30-car garage and uses air-rights from four adjacent low-rise residential buildings o the avenue and as part of the city's inclusionary housing program it will provide about 10,000 square feet of affordable housing.

The Educational Construction Fund was created in 1966 and it best known for its mixed-use developments such as the office-building/Norman Thomas High School on the southeast corner of Park Avenue and 34th Street and the apartment building/Robert F. Kennedy School on 88th Street between Park and Lexington Avenues.

James Smart, executive director of the fund, has told the community board that the new school will replace P.S. 151 that has been vacant on the site since 2000 and that the project will permit the creation of a $40-million, "modern, 21st Century school at no capital or expense outlay for the city." It will be known as the East Side Middle School and it has been operating in cramped quarters at P.S. 158 and its student enrollment will now be permitted to expand by about 200 students to 540 students.

Mr. Smart noted that the city will retain ownership of the land and Mr. Davidson said that as a result the residential tower will be a condop.

The school will have a red-brick facade on 91st Street and contain 14 classrooms, two science labs, a music room, an art room, a multi-purpose room and a cafeteria and will have planters and benches in front of it on 91st Street and recreational playgrounds on 92nd Street.

It is anticipated that the project will be completed by September, 2008.


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Old July 18th, 2007, 09:53 AM   #1049
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Harlem's Box Update: Bonus Mind-Exploding Rendering!





Tuesday, July 17, 2007,
by Lockhart

here's not much new in a press release send to the Curbed inbox about Harlem Park, Vornado's forthcoming 21-story office tower slated for 125th Street and Park that we first revealed back in March. Nothing much new, that is, save for the above even more mind-exploding rendering, which does, if we may say so, a sublime job of showing how the structure crafted by the firm of Swanke Hayden Connell Architects blends seamlessly into the Harlem street grid. Or, as the archibabble puts it, "Set on an 85-foot podium, the 18-story main shaft of the tower features a unitized aluminum and glass curtainwall system with integrated vertical terra cotta color fins that create a unique enclosure echoing the predominant masonry construction of surrounding buildings." And how!

More from the press release:
According to Roger Klein, design principal for SHCA, the new tower, while taller than the surrounding neighborhood, is designed to complement the aesthetics and scale of the neighborhood. "The design is intended to enhance the transparency of the building, and harmonize with the surrounding masonry neighborhood," he pointed out. "Typically, the design of a tower would express its verticality. In this case, we countered the verticality with a composition of smaller-scale 'stacked boxes', which grounds the building in the scale of the neighborhood.

"There is great visibility from the Metro North Station, as one travels over the Triborough Bridge onto the 125th Street, and from Central Park," he added. "As a result, Harlem Park will be a true icon for Harlem and the city. In particular, the top box in the stack of compositional boxes—designed to be illuminated at night—is defined as a distinct cubic form."

Wow, this guy's good. Mr. Klein, Curbed salutes you. Meantime, for more hard data on the Harlem Park project, check this Curbed post. Hallelujah.


Copyright © 2007 Curbed
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Old July 18th, 2007, 11:19 PM   #1050
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beautiful projects, love them all
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Old July 19th, 2007, 10:08 PM   #1051
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New York, Especially Manhattan, Is In With the Innkeeping Crowd


BY MICHAEL STOLER
July 19, 2007

More than 44 million people are expected to visit New York this year, requiring more and more hotel rooms and helping to make the city one of the fastest growing hotel markets in the country. Last year, the city's hospitality industry shattered records by getting an average daily rate of $265, with an occupancy rate of 85%. Nearly all of the city's hotels were operating at capacity, and in the month of December, the average daily room rate reached $330.

Based on the pace of the first six months, those records will be broken in 2007. Manhattan is the no. 1 business district in the country, yet only seventh in size from a hotel guest-room perspective: It has about 66,000 rooms, compared with 150,000 in Las Vegas.

"Lodging assets have become one of New York City's most desired asset classes and their performance continues to grow at a frantic pace, beating all historical benchmarks," the managing director of the Ackman-Ziff Real Estate Group, Mark Owens, said. "Manhattan's record-demand growth is attributed to increased corporate spending, a strong economy, and rebounding overseas visitors due to the weak dollar. Two other components have assisted Manhattan hoteliers: substantial inventory reduction, a result of hotels being converted to residential units, and increasing construction costs," he added.

"Since the city is ‘under-hoteled' as compared to other top international markets," the managing director and a principal at Sonnenblick Goldman, Mark Gordon, noted, "we can't have too many hotels for the foreseeable future." He added, however, that the operational complexities of the hotel business are often underestimated.

Demand appears to be increasing for the near term: The city may lose 3,000 rooms over the next few years. Industry leaders expect Vornado Realty Trust to demolish the 1,700-room Hotel Pennsylvania to make way for a mixed-use development in the Penn Station area, and, as I reported last week, the owners of the 1,015-room Hotel Roosevelt have retained an investment banker to sell the property, which will probably be razed to make way for a commercial office building.

All this makes it a good market for building hotel units, analysts say: "Considering that, just a few years back, hotels were not considered an asset class on a par with other forms of real estate, the hotel industry has come a long way," a senior managing director at CB Richard Ellis, Daniel Lesser, said.

"Hotels are being planned and developed throughout the five boroughs and encompass all asset classes: boutiques, business-class, select service branded, economy class, independents, and major brands," Mr. Lesser, whose bailiwick is as an industry leader for valuation and advisory services at CB Richard Ellis's hospitality and gaming group, added.

The largest number of new hotels is planned for Midtown Manhattan, according to Mr. Lesser. Five thousand rooms are expected to open in 2007 and about 13,000 hotel rooms are currently in some phase of development in Manhattan.

"As rates and occupancies continue to surpass historical levels, hotel development economics are again becoming favorable and are spurring a variety of new hotels and projects throughout the city," Mr. Owens observed. "The current pipeline of development, be they branded, upscale, or limited service, can only enhance a market that is constantly turning away demand."

Assuming a static environment, the additions to supply in this highly competitive market will enable the city to better accommodate those turned-away travelers. However, Manhattan is not static, Mr. Owens added, suggesting that, as the city continues to grow and transform, new hotels will be necessary to maintain the market's ability to efficiently host its guests.

According to a report by HVS International, at least 2,777 boutique hotel rooms are expected to enter the Manhattan market over the next three years. A senior vice president and head of hospitality lending for HSH Nordbank, Frank Anderson, said, "The New York City and, particularly, the boutique-hotel markets are thriving at this moment with weekday business travelers and weekend leisure travelers."

More than 25 hotels are expected to open over the next 18 months. The most luxurious hotel planned is within the renovated Plaza Hotel site. This October, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Plaza, a 130-unit transient luxury hotel and 152-unit condominium hotel are expected to welcome their first guests. Other hotels will include the 90-room Six Columbus Hotel, across from the Time Warner Center; the renovated 420-room Empire Hotel, across from Lincoln Center; the Hilton Garden Inn, at 6 York St.; the Duane Street Hotel at 130 Duane St.; the 150-room Four Points SoHo, at 66 Charlton St., and Robert DeNiro, Richard Born, and Ira Druckier's 90-room Downtown Hotel at 377 Greenwich St.

More than 50 hospitality projects now in various planning stages are scheduled to open throughout the city beginning in 2008. Many of these are boutique hotels in Lower Manhattan, the West Village, the High Line area, Midtown, the east side, and in Harlem. Notable projects include the "1" Hotel and Residences at Bryant Park, the W Hotel and residences on Washington Street, the Andaz by Hyatt on Fifth Avenue across from the New York Public Library, the Andaz at 75 Wall St., the ultraluxury Shangri-La Hotel on East 53rd Street, the Hotel Indigo at 127 W. 28th St., the W Hotel and residences on Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn, and the Thompson LES on Allen Street, on the Lower East Side.

Last month, a ceremonial groundbreaking was held for the city's first ground-up time-share ownership residential hotel. The West 57th Street by Hilton Club will rise between Sixth and Seventh avenues on the former home of a Horn & Hardart. When completed in 2009, the 28-story tower will have 161 units. The first timeshare condominium in Manhattan, the Manhattan Club in the western half of the Park Central Hotel on Seventh Avenue and West 56th Street, opened in 1997. It was followed in December 2002 by the Hilton Club on the top three floors of the New York Hilton.

"Everyone wants to invest in hotels and New York remains the top hotel investment market in the world," Mr. Gordon said. "The international investment community continues to actively pursue New York City hotels with recent transactions with Spanish, Italian , and Middle East investors."

This month, 960 Sixth Avenue LLC, an American subsidiary of the Statuto Group, a Milan-based company, will close on its purchase of the former Atlantic Bank Building in the Herald Square area, currently owned by New York Community Bancorp. The price of the 16-story, 99,000-square-foot building is $105 million, or $1,060 a square foot. According to the trade, the new owner plans to convert the property into a hotel.

Directly adjacent to this building is the former ICON parking lot, off Sixth Avenue on West 35th Street. Earlier this year, the property was purchased by a joint venture between Israel-based Brack Capital Real Estate and Westbrook Partners. The joint venture has demolished the building to make way for a luxury hotel. And, as I reported last week, Skyline Developers is in contract to purchase an office building a little farther uptown, at 1040 Sixth Ave., as well as two adjacent buildings, and their development rights. It is paying $170 million for the 24-story, 256,000-square-foot building. The new owner is considering a residential development or a boutique hotel.

The New York Sun has also learned that an investment broker is marketing the 665-room Sheraton Manhattan at 790 Seventh Ave., at West 51st Street. In addition to its excellent location, the property could offer investors excellent retail and a major parking garage. Industry leaders expect the property to trade for close to $850,000 a room. Also in Times Square, trade sources have confirmed to the Sun that two major development sites are in play for possible hotel or residential mixed-use developments.

Some real estate leaders are concerned about the number of developments, locations, and developers, as well as the financing of upcoming projects.

"The key thing about the boom in hotel construction and revenue is that ‘location' will matter in the near future if the economy slows down or the dollars get stronger and foreign tourists level off in the city," the president of the City Investment Fund, Thomas Lydon, said. "A good number of the hotels under construction are not in prime locations, and have brands which are unproven in the New York marketplace. Some will work, but others will flounder when a competitive market is the name of the game. That being said, full-service, recognizable brands are not being built in any quantity, so this sector has a good chance of outperforming the overall market over the next three to five years."

If there are any concerns for hotel development, they are driven by project financing and the development team responsible for the project, Mr. Anderson said. "Until the last two months, leverage on new supply has been increasing due to an overabundance of liquidity throughout the capital stack, with mezzanine financing particularly available," he said.

Inexperienced new money sources have entered the market, from foreign and/or non-hotel investors with limited hotel-investing experience in America, and lenders without hotel construction lending experience. The concern is that hotels are operating businesses as well as real estate plays. There is no doubt supply is badly needed, but the quality of the execution, both on the hotel development and ramp-up financing side, will need to be closely monitored.

A principal at Thompson Hotels, Michael Pomeranc, said, "The industry is inviting players who will get into trouble. Financial projections are being massaged to show numbers that inexperienced lenders want to see by reducing the lending leverage. Inexperienced operators are also borrowing more expensive money."

"Certain deals will eventually falter when the market doesn't grow as fast as anticipated," Mr. Pomeranc warned, noting that "bars and restaurants are struggling in these properties because they are ill-planned and not attracting spenders unless these places become super hot."

Overheated construction costs also add to woes of ill-planned projects by increasing room costs; players are retaliating by cutting room sizes, he continued. "It's no wonder that larger established hotels are most profitable these days," he said. "The best upscale brands, coupled with experienced and careful planning, will continue to raise the bar, especially in the very upscale ‘cool' market. Luxury brands with strong recognition and reputation will steadily grow."

So the future looks very bright for the New York hospitality industry in the near term. One must concur with the chief operating officer of Citi Habitats, Gary Malin, when he says, "With a strong New York City economy and an expected rise in demand, especially from tourism, it's clear the demand for rooms will continue to exceed supply."


© 2007 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.
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Old July 20th, 2007, 08:02 PM   #1052
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Downtown Brookyn’s Towers: 2 Top Out, 2 Break Ground, 1 in Site Prep
Estimated $9 Billion in Developments Underway


by Brooklyn Eagle,
published online 07-20-2007

DOWNTOWN BROOKLYN — As two large-scale residential projects have their topping out, two more have their groundbreaking and a third undergoes site preparation, the renaissance in Downtown Brooklyn shows no sign of stopping.

All five projects are the result of the Downtown Brooklyn Rezoning Plan, which allows the construction of millions of square feet of new office, retail, residential and academic space. It also committed nearly $100 million in public investment, according to Joe Chan, president of the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership.

“With more than $9 billion in private investment underway, Downtown Brooklyn is experiencing an historic period of growth,” said Joe Chan, president of the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership. “New residential, hotel, and office projects, retail, an arena for a professional basketball team, new cultural facilities and a waterfront park are all under development. This activity reaffirms the area’s status as one of America’s great emerging downtowns.”


Site Preparation


The newest and least known of the five developments is a project by AvalonBay Communities, a company that is “in the business of developing, redeveloping, acquiring and managing luxury rental communities,” according to its website.

Site preparation work has begun on AvalonBay’s $250 million, 41-story mixed-use tower at Myrtle Avenue and Gold Street, where at least nine low-rise buildings will be demolished.

The new tower will include 628 rental units, a below-grade parking garage and 5,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space.

It should be ready for occupancy in 2009, according to Philip Wharton, vice president of development for AvalonBay Communities.

“Avalon is delighted to be a part of the renaissance taking place in Downtown Brooklyn,” said Wharton, who added that this project is part of AvalonBay’s expansion throughout the New York metro area.” A rendering of the tower and further details were not yet available at press time.


Topping Out


The two developments that had their topping out this month are [email protected], the 25-story residential tower and loft building at 189 Schermerhorn St.; and Oro, the 40-story tower at 306 Gold St. A project of developers Lou Greco, Jr. and Mario Procida, principals of SDS Procida, 189 Schermerhorn topped out last week.

As previously reported, it will have 246 condominium units and approximately 15,000 square feet of street-level retail space. The project also features an adjoining six-story loft building with townhouses. The developers estimate completion in fall 2008.

“SDS Procida strongly believes in the viability of Downtown Brooklyn and have been doing business in the area for over 25 years,” said Greco. “Our newest condominium project ... is a testament to our continued commitment to this dynamic and vibrant neighborhood.”

Ron Hershco, president of United Homes, the developer of Oro 306, reports its topping out this week. It will be the first building completed along the Flatbush Avenue Extension corridor, which has approximately $3.1 billion in projects under development.

The 40-story building will have 303 condominiums and is expected to be completed and open for occupancy in January 2008.

“The incredible response we received from perspective residents confirmed our expectations about Downtown Brooklyn,” said Hershco. “This area presents tremendous opportunities for the future of New York and we are excited to be part of its growth.”


Groundbreaking


The two new, mixed-use development projects that have broken ground in recent weeks include two more 40-story towers — Oro 313, another project by United Homes at 313 Gold St.; and the $200 million tower by BFC Partners at Myrtle Avenue and Prince Street.

United Homes’ $168 million second project will have 296 condos and is expected to be completed by April 2008. Originally planned for BFC Partners’ $200 million, mixed-use tower will have 240 condominium units, 20 percent of which will be available to moderate-income families, and will include 13,000 square feet of ground floor retail space.

It is scheduled to be completed in March 2009, according to Donald Capoccia, managing principal at BFC.

“With so much activity taking place in Downtown Brooklyn this project could not be in a better environment,” said Capoccia. “As the area undergoes a renaissance we are proud to be creating much needed housing and providing retail space to make the district a better place to work, live and shop.”

A rendering of this tower and further details were also not available at press time.


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2007
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Old July 20th, 2007, 08:13 PM   #1053
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wow, brooklyn is getting a wonderful skyline!!
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Old July 27th, 2007, 01:02 AM   #1054
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What's That Shiny Building, and What Have They Done With Our Bus Station?



By: Alec Appelbaum
7/17/07
nymag.com

When Governor Spitzer held a press conference Friday to announce the state was opening bidding for the 12-million-square-foot Hudson Yards site, he mentioned another bit of redevelopment in the works for the West Side: an imminent overhaul of the Port Authority Bus Terminal. Which promptly sent us scurrying to the Port Authority's Website, looking for details. We turned up these renderings and these optimistic stats: Apparently they're planning 55,000 square feet of spiffed-up stores, 26 new bus gates, and a bright office tower on top. Even if the building doesn't look too architecturally interesting, it's still nice to imagine a presentable depot. Just don't count on it anytime soon; feasibility studies will be ongoing till 2009.
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Old July 30th, 2007, 05:14 AM   #1055
TalB
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/07252007...lois_weiss.htm
BENDEL FOR SALE

MAY GET OFFER AS HIGH AS $200M

July 25, 2007 -- THE former Henri Ben del Building on 10-14 W. 57th St. could be sold for as much as $200 million and redeveloped into a bigger hotel retail project.

We hear that the Fabulous Foursome at Cushman & Wakefield - Richard Baxter, Ron Cohen, Scott Latham and Jon Caplan - were hired to sell the current 11-story building, which has about 84,000 feet. But a redevelopment could send it soaring skywards with 113,000 feet and no height restriction.

The retail spaces, currently occupied by Sharper Image and MacKenzie Childs, are both up for sublease through Susan Kurland.

Office and showroom tenants are an upscale mix that includes the Bliss Spa, fashion guru Dawn Mello, and Holly Dunlap's Hollywould. Some tenants also have demolition clauses or short-term deals.

There were no comments from the peanut gallery.
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Old July 30th, 2007, 05:18 AM   #1056
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oh hell yeah! does "no hight restriction" include the 2000ft one set by the FAA? although a 113,000 sq ft building wouldn even come close to this hight so nevermind.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 06:35 AM   #1057
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this is all goood
any1 know of any proposed buildings topping the freedom tower???
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Old August 1st, 2007, 09:52 AM   #1058
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^ not at the current moment. There are speculations that the developement on the West side might have alot of tall towers but nobody knows the exact size yet. I guess we have to wait.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 09:55 AM   #1059
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Harlem to Get First Luxury Hotel


by Mark Wellborn
Published: July 31, 2007

Luxury lodging is coming to Harlem.

Paul Reisman of New Jersey-based Reisman Properties recently told The Observer that his company is breaking ground in August on a hotel on 125th Street.

“The hotel will run along Fifth Avenue from 125th to 126th Street,” Mr. Reisman said.

Although a flag has yet to be picked for the property, Mr. Reisman said that a number of very high-end chains are in the running. “Right now, who we go with is an open question,” he said. “But we are narrowing it down.”

The property will be designed by Handel Architects, an architecture firm whose clients include 40 Bond Street, the Trump Soho Hotel and the Ritz-Carlton, Downtown. Once completed, the hotel will be 19 stories tall and cover over 130,000 square-feet.

"There will be somewhere between 240 and 260 rooms in the hotel, and it will have 25,000 square feet of banquet and meeting space,” Mr. Reisman said.

He would not disclose the total cost for the development, but did say that it would “be north of $80 million.”

Mr. Reisman started Reisman Properties in 1979 with his brother, Steven. This will be the company’s first hotel project in New York City.


Copyright © 2007 The New York Observer
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Old August 1st, 2007, 10:00 AM   #1060
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Manhattan: Agreement on West Side Medical Tower


By CHARLES V. BAGLI
August 1, 2007

Two New York developers have signed an agreement to build a 1.2 million-square-foot office tower on the Far West Side that would serve as a hub for manufacturers of devices, diagnostics, computer systems and other equipment for the medical industry. The developers — Gary Barnett, the chief executive of the Extell Development Corporation, and Israel Green — said they planned to begin construction in early 2009. The tower would rise at 11th Avenue and 34th Street, on a site that is now home to the Copacabana nightclub. Mr. Green has spent five years developing the concept and pursuing a Manhattan location. He said it was an opportunity for New York City to become the principal center for the $260 billion global market for medical devices and diagnostics. The project may have to wait until the city completes part of an extension of the No. 7 subway line, which passes beneath the site.


Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
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