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Old August 12th, 2007, 12:13 AM   #1081
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wait how many floors is the moore building gonna be,??
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Old August 12th, 2007, 08:51 AM   #1082
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8 .
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Old August 12th, 2007, 09:21 PM   #1083
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TalB View Post
Williamsburg is hardly a slum or ghetto to begin with.
Indeed, I was born and raised here. Still live here. I couldn't believe that "news story" above, No food stores? No fresh fruit? Dangerous at night? It never ceases to amaze me that solid, close knit communities that have existed for over a 100 years, suddenly are called wastlands by newcomers. Like they make it all so much better. The original neighborhood is being destroyed, it's original residents are being pushed out. It's a vicious cycle, as soon as the artists move in, the "hipsters" follow, then the kids with trust funds, finally the wealthy.
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Old August 13th, 2007, 02:13 AM   #1084
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thats true. It happens a lot in ny the poor are kicked out for the wealthy. they just relocate and then get kicked out again.
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Old August 13th, 2007, 06:01 AM   #1085
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Vision Group developing Brooklyn condo project

The $22 million Greenpoint Lofts project will have 68 business condominiums.

Ariel Rosenberg 12 Aug 07 15:14

Vision Real Estate Group, owned by Amir Yerushalmi, is developing the Greenpoint Lofts business condominium project in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, for $22 million. The project has 68 offices. Soaring rents in New York, where 95% of offices are rented, has resulted in a new trend of business condominiums, or commercial condominiums, in which offices can be purchased, rather than leased.

A business condominium can be purchased for half the price of an apartment condominium, and real estate experts predict that the business condominium will become an increasingly important niche market in the coming years.

Vision Group says that Greenpoint Lofts is the first project of its kind in Brooklyn, and one of the first in New York City. The building at 231 Norman Avenue was built in the 1930s for industrial use, and was later used as a warehouse. Vision Group is now renovating the structure for its new use.

Published by Globes [online], Israel business news - www.globes.co.il - on August 12, 2007

© Copyright of Globes Publisher Itonut (1983) Ltd. 2007
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Old August 13th, 2007, 10:28 AM   #1086
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HARLEM SHUFFLE
BUILDING BOOM IS OUSTING OL' FAVES





By KATHIANNE BONIELLO and CATHERINE NANCE
August 12, 2007

The heart of Harlem is being reshaped - some say gutted - in a blitz of big-money real-estate deals, starting with nearly a dozen small shops getting squeezed out to make way for retail and office development.

"Harlem will be gone," lamented Lanise Benjamin, whose 90-year-old grandfather's legendary music shop, Bobby's Happy House, is being evicted from Frederick Douglass Boulevard. "To tear this building down would essentially be to tear Harlem apart."

Bobby's has been in the neighborhood 61 years. But along with nearly a dozen other stores, it got an eviction notice last month after the building between West 125th and 126th streets was sold in a $50 million real-estate deal involving three West 125th Street parcels.

While developers tout plans for hotels, condominiums, office space and national retailers, local businesses are getting left behind, store owners complained. The pressure of rising rents is being felt particularly along the entire length of the main commercial artery of 125th Street, where nearly a dozen projects, both proposed and under way, have sprung up.

"It's a shame, and it's so unfair to the people who have kept the community the way it is," said Sikhulu Shange, owner of the Record Shack on 125th Street. "This is the economical lynching of the community, and it's not right."

Philip Bulgar, manager of Manna's Soul Food and Salad Bar, next door to Bobby's, said the current owners weathered the area's drug- and crime-plagued eras and should be allowed to remain now that times are good.

"It's sad that it has come to this," Bulgar said. "This is going to be a vastly different community, and I'm not sure it's going to be for the better. The people here deserve better."

Not everyone decries the changes. National retail chains and more money flowing into the community raises everyone up, Harlem resident Gerard Matthews noted.

"It's nice to see the businesses and the homeowners who have worked hard to make the area a healthy, happy community get some long-overdue help with city investment in Harlem," he said. "But at the same time, nobody wants to see longtime residents get priced out."

Instead of Bobby's, Manna's and others, Kimco Realty and the Sigfeld Group plan a 100,000-square-foot redevelopment and claim they are helping the existing tenants relocate.

"The new retail development will serve to improve an already-thriving retail community," said Eric Hochman, who added that Kimco simply took advantage of the termination clauses in shop owners' existing leases.

Longtime Harlem real-estate player Eugene Giscombe, who is also chairman of the 125th Street Business Improvement District's board of directors, brokered the deal that sold the Frederick Douglass Boulevard space to Kimco and Sigfeld.

Neither Sigfeld nor Giscombe's brokerage firm, Giscombe Henderson, returned calls for comment.


Copyright 2007 NYP Holdings, Inc.
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Old August 13th, 2007, 11:58 PM   #1087
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamliner61 View Post
Indeed, I was born and raised here. Still live here. I couldn't believe that "news story" above, No food stores? No fresh fruit? Dangerous at night? It never ceases to amaze me that solid, close knit communities that have existed for over a 100 years, suddenly are called wastlands by newcomers. Like they make it all so much better. The original neighborhood is being destroyed, it's original residents are being pushed out. It's a vicious cycle, as soon as the artists move in, the "hipsters" follow, then the kids with trust funds, finally the wealthy.
To a developer, anything is blighted, which is what they use as an excuse to build their project when that ends up being blighted.
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Old August 14th, 2007, 07:20 AM   #1088
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Big buildings on fast track


By Ariella Cohen
August 11, 2007

Building projects are picking up pace in Carroll Gardens as city officials consider a preservation-minded change in zoning that would limit the size of new buildings.

If passed, it would force developers to change their plans to fit with new low-rise regulations
— potentially costing them hundreds of thousands of dollars in condo sales and architectural fees.

“Look at the number of buildings under construction, it’s a race against the clock for them,” said Maria Pagano, president of the Carroll Gardens Neighborhood Association and an advocate of the rezoning, which would limit building heights to 50 feet, or five-stories, across a broad stretch of the Brownstone neighborhood.

It will take at least another eight months for the proposed change to become law. Buildings that have foundations dug before the change is made will be grandfathered in under the current rules, which allow buildings to rise 70 feet.

A worker on the site of a residential development at 100 Luquer St. said that the project — which would be illegal under the proposed zoning — was running at top speed.

“We are going to be working full days from now on,” he said.

The tower, designed by post-modern starchitect Karl Fischer, will rise between Clinton and Henry streets near the BQE.

A half a block away on the corner of Luquer and Henry streets overlooking the highway, construction has begun on a 60-foot residential building. That building would be also be illegal under the rezoning. The building is now in excavation stages.

On the other side of the neighborhood, builders are putting finishing touches on a blocky 55-foot condo at 342 Bond St. near the Carroll Street bridge. Building plans for a controversial 70-foot condo building at 360 Smith St. have already been approved and engineers were on the site this week doing preliminary work.

The Department of City Planning declined to give any details on a timeline for a Carroll Gardens rezoning. A spokeswoman said that officials “recognize the need to study Carroll Gardens and work with community and elected officials to address the zoning.”

Carroll Gardens is not the only neighborhood that has approached the city with a rezoning proposal, creating a demand for planning services that Pagano and others worry will slow the tortoise-like process even more.


©2007 The Brooklyn Paper
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Old August 14th, 2007, 07:24 AM   #1089
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Columbia University mails out pamphlet about its expansion





13-AUG-07

olumbia University has mailed a two-page brochure to about 50,000 residents of Upper Manhattan about its planned expansion in Manhattanville, proclaiming that it "isn't moving offshore."

The brochure notes that the huge project would create 1,200 construction jobs and 6,000 new university jobs by 2030.

It stated that the project would "clean up waste left by past decades of industrial and automotive uses" on the site and that "during construction Columbia will adhere to the highest environmental standards for building, air emission and energy" and that it will place support services like heating, cooling, truck delivery and parking in a large underground basement to ensure that streets and sidewalks are pedestrian-friendly and environmentally appealing."

The brochure maintained that "no resident in any of the 132 housing units in the area will be evicted because of eminent domain" and that it has "guaranteed local affordable housing for them." The university's expansion covers about 17 acres between 129th and 133rd Streets and the 12th Avenue Viaduct and the Broadway IRT line.

"Over the past four years," the brochure stated, "more than one-third of the University's contracts for construction, repair and maintenance - worth more than $65 million last year alone- went to minority- women- or locally owned firms in Upper Manhattan or the South Bronx."

The university also said it would provide scholarships for West Harlem students and that its project will be "green."


Copyright © 1994-2007 CITY REALTY.COM INC
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Old August 14th, 2007, 09:34 PM   #1090
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the skyline will change a lot!!
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Old August 15th, 2007, 06:21 PM   #1091
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NYU has eyes on Brooklyn, Queens


by michael rundle
AUG 15, 2007

BROOKLYN. New York University says it needs to expand by 6 million square feet in the next 25 years, and battles waged in the Village by preservationists to curb NYU’s appetite for space have forced the university to look elsewhere. Now it’s looking to grow in Brooklyn and Queens.

On June 21 the university announced it had leased 115 units at 67 Livingston St. to house graduate students. NYU’s presence in the borough will grow further if a merger with Polytechnic University goes ahead.

Local groups say for now there is little to fear — NYU is currently only leasing space, not building new dorms, and worries of a Village-style expansion are premature.

“For the moment we raise no objection to students living there,” said Judy Stanton, executive director of the Brooklyn Heights Association. “I don’t anticipate any problems.”

Only if NYU were to begin construction, Stanton said, would there be cause for alarm. But those worries might not be so far-fetched.

In a June 28 open house presentation made on campus about NYU’s plans for the next 25 years, a map showed possible expansion sites in Downtown Brooklyn, Long Island City and Governors Island.

“NYU recognizes that its future growth cannot all be located within the Washington Square core,” the report said. “[NYU will] develop a set of principles that will guide evaluation of these remote locations for future growth.”

According to Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, this should raise concerns. His group pushed for NYU to consider locations outside the West Village, but hopes that NYU will not overwhelm new areas in the process.

“I strongly urge [local groups] to engage NYU to ensure the process contributes to the quality of life there,” he told Metro yesterday. “And not to its detriment.”

A spokesperson for NYU stressed that the new Brooklyn Heights dorm did not necessarily indicate the area will see further expansion. There are growth opportunities in all five boroughs as well as outside the city, said spokesperson Kelly Franklin, and the public will be fully consulted at every stage.

“That’s the whole point of this planning process,” she said. “To listen to and address people’s concerns.”


© 2007 Metro. All Rights Reserved.
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Old August 15th, 2007, 10:35 PM   #1092
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NYU already has half of Lower Manhattan and a chunk of Kips Bay, so what more do they need?
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Old August 16th, 2007, 10:14 PM   #1093
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Leumi to finance Katan Brooklyn project

Katan Development is redeveloping the historic Eberhard Faber Pencil Factory in Greenpoint.

Ariel Rosenberg 15 Aug 07 16:25

Bank Leumi (TASE: LUMI) will finance a $49 million Brooklyn residential project by Katan Development LLC, owned by Isaac Katan. The company is planning a 93-unit waterfront project in Greenpoint in Eberhard Faber Pencil Factory, which will be preserved and renovated. Two adjacent buildings will be demolished and an apartment block will be built in their place.

The Eberhard Faber Pencil Factory is one of Brooklyn’s landmarks, located in the old industrial zone and shipyards. The New York Landmarks Preservation Commission slated the factory for preservation as part of the redevelopment. Katan Development is a major developer in Brooklyn with a number projects, with 4,000 apartments altogether, in the borough.

Katan predicts a boom for luxury apartments in New York as the baby boomers retire and seek to enjoy the city’s thriving atmosphere during their golden years.

Published by Globes [online], Israel business news - www.globes.co.il - on August 15, 2007

© Copyright of Globes Publisher Itonut (1983) Ltd. 2007
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Old August 18th, 2007, 11:40 PM   #1094
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/18/ny...l?ref=nyregion
Plan for Site of ’06 Blast on East Side Is Criticized

By DAVID W. DUNLAP
Published: August 18, 2007


3 Dimensional Technology

A rendering of the plan for a house at 34 East 62nd Street.



Gabriele Stabile for The New York Times

The Links Club building, left, which was cited in 1917 for “traditional elegance,” next to the planned site of a modern town house.


The Links Club usually whispers. This week, it growled.

“These design plans bear no resemblance to any building feature on our block,” said John S. Pyne, the president of the private club, referring to the understated block of East 62nd Street between Madison and Park Avenues. (You will not find the club’s name on the door at No. 36, just ornamental L’s and C’s in the window grilles.) Mr. Pyne was referring to plans for a contemporary, limestone-clad, five-story, single-family town house next door to the Links.

“We do not think that the design of 34 East 62nd is appropriate to our block,” Mr. Pyne said in a letter to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, “and I would argue rather subjectively that the personality does not fit either.”

The vacant lot where the town house would rise was occupied by a Victorian-era brownstone that blew up on July 10, 2006. The owner, Dr. Nicholas Bartha, was suspected of causing the explosion by tampering with the gas line as an act of vengeance against his former wife. He was badly injured in the blast and died five days later.

Rather than try to recreate a 19th-century brownstone, the new owner of the property, Janna Bullock, a real estate developer, and her architect, Preston T. Phillips, have proposed a wholly modern approach. It was considered on Tuesday in a hearing by the landmarks commission, whose finding of appropriateness will be needed for any project on the site, which is within the Upper East Side Historic District.

Robert B. Tierney, the chairman of the commission, said in an interview yesterday that the commission sought refinements in the design. In a separate interview, Mr. Phillips said his office was already exploring modifications, which he hopes to present to the commission next month.

But Mr. Tierney was clearly not closing the door on the general idea.

“I think in very specific — and perhaps limited — circumstances, in a historic district of this kind or other historic districts, a striking contemporary/modern approach or solution is and can be found appropriate; more than appropriate, that it should be encouraged.”

He added that he was confident that the historic district would get “a landmark for the future,” that people would see as being “of its time, of the 21st century.”

The 91-year-old Links Club, Community Board 8 and several leading preservation groups are less sure. Playing an advisory role, the Upper East Side community board voted 27 to 5 last month to disapprove the plan on the ground that it is “not in keeping” with the historic district.

Specific elements that came in for criticism at the landmarks commission hearing included the windowless central bay, which “gives the false appearance of housing an elevator shaft or an emergency stairway,” said Roger P. Lang of the New York Landmarks Conservancy.

A canopy over the fifth-floor balcony was described in a statement by the Historic Districts Council as a feature that “looms over the rest of the building like a high-dive platform.”

The Friends of the Upper East Side Historic Districts said in a statement that it was most troubled by the “treatment of the entryway as a shadowed void, instead of a more clearly identified and celebrated element as seen on most buildings in the historic district.”

Actually, the treatment of the entryway was intended to complement that of the Links Club, which is also recessed, said Mr. Phillips, the architect. The town house would be set back five feet from the property line in deference to the club, he said, and its fifth floor would be set back more than eight feet so as not to hem in the club’s adjoining mansard roof.

Though the town house interiors are outside the commission’s charge, the floor plans that were shown on Tuesday gave some sense of how extravagant Ms. Bullock means the place to be, with four bedrooms, an indoor swimming pool, a rooftop garden, a waterfall in the backyard, a conservatory, a wine cave, a spa and a butler’s pantry.

Last month, Ms. Bullock said the house might go on the market for $30 million to $40 million.

Mr. Phillips said the project would seek certification under Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) guidelines. Water in the waterfall would be recirculated from rain-collecting cisterns. Geothermal wells would be drilled to provide natural heat. Building materials would be shipped no farther than 500 miles. That led the architects to Ontario in search of limestone.

But limestone is just the problem for the red-brick Links Club. “The use of limestone is jarring and overbearing,” Mr. Pyne, the club president, said in his letter to the commission. He cited a 1917 article in The Architectural Record in which the clubhouse design, by Cross & Cross, was described as appealing to those “who like the effects of quiet breeding, traditional elegance, of considered good taste.”

Last year’s deadly and dramatic explosion still hangs over the project, though it is usually referred to obliquely. But Mr. Tierney saw a certain advantage in inheriting a vacant lot. “The decks are clear,” he said, “for a fresh look at the space and the building.”
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Old August 21st, 2007, 02:03 AM   #1095
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/15/ny...c1NQCQ++h4pbDA
The Times’s First Home Is Being Torn Down

By DAVID W. DUNLAP
Published: August 15, 2007


David Dunlap/The New York Times

The first office of The New York Times, 113 Nassau Street, is being demolished.


After enduring a century and a half of change in Lower Manhattan, decrepit and anonymous, the birthplace of The New York Times is now being torn down, brick by brick.

By an odd turn of history, the demolition of The Times’s oldest home occurred just as the company settles into its seventh and newest headquarters, a 52-story tower across Eighth Avenue from the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

Yesterday, a worker armed with an appropriately 19th-century demolition tool — a sledgehammer — sat astride the south wall of 113 Nassau Street, between Ann and Beekman Streets, pounding chunks of the structure into dust.

“Little old building,” Margaret Moffatt said wistfully as she walked by on her lunch hour with some colleagues, one of whom, Henry Raven, was a bit more sarcastic. “Making way for progress,” he said.

(Actually, it may be making way for a 28-story residential building, to judge from applications filed with the city’s Department of Buildings. The owners did not respond to telephone messages yesterday.)

What Ms. Moffatt and Mr. Raven did not know — few New Yorkers do — is that Volume 1, Number 1 of The New-York Daily Times, four pages for one penny, was published at 113 Nassau Street on Sept. 18, 1851. The newspaper stayed there until 1854, when it moved a bit closer to City Hall.

This six-story building was, in other words, a journalistic log cabin.

And it was not much more accommodating. There was no glass yet in the windows on the evening when The Times first went to press. Breezes blew through the place, extinguishing the candlelight. “All was raw and dismal,” Augustus Maverick wrote in his 1870 biography of Henry J. Raymond, the founding editor.

Raw and dismal it remained. What little architectural integrity the building possessed was all but wiped away in the 1970s when it became a McDonald’s. The property was put up for sale in 2004. The New York Times Company had no interest in buying it. There was no serious talk of landmark designation.

From 113 Nassau Street, Raymond declared in his first editorial that The Times would present “all the news of the day from all parts of the world” and appear “for an indefinite number of years to come.”

He said something else on that long-ago September day: “No newspaper, which was really fit to live, ever yet expired for lack of readers.” Where these words were written is now a pile of rubble.
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Old August 22nd, 2007, 11:08 PM   #1096
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/22/re...l?ref=business
Counting on a Hotel to Make a Neighborhood Hot

By C. J. HUGHES
Published: August 22, 2007


Stephen B. Jacobs Group

A developer is betting that his Gansevoort Park hotel, above, can replicate the success of his Hotel Gansevoort in Manhattan.



Kitra Cahana for The New York Times

The area around Park Avenue South and East 29th Street.


To understand how the meatpacking district in downtown Manhattan was transformed from an obscure collection of a few bistros and boutiques scattered among beef-filled warehouses to a hot residential, commercial and entertainment destination, consider Michael Achenbaum’s explanation.

One crucial event, he said, was the debut of the Hotel Gansevoort in March 2004 at West 13th Street and Ninth Avenue. After that, he said, the neighborhood suddenly seemed to have a lot more electricity.

Mr. Achenbaum is not entirely objective, of course; he was the hotel’s developer. But the opening of his 13-story 187-room glass-and-steel property, which cost $70 million to build, was a relatively early signal to other investors about the area’s potential.

In addition, the building’s distinctive rooftop bar and pool, open to nonguests, were almost instantly trendy and heightened the buzz about the neighborhood.

Now Mr. Achenbaum, a principal of WSA Management, based in Garden City on Long Island, hopes to copy that neighborhood-fostering success with a new hotel, Gansevoort Park, at the southwestern corner of Park Avenue South and East 29th Street. It is to be developed with Centurion Realty, whose portfolio includes four million square feet of residential and commercial properties, including 12 other New York buildings.

The hurdles, though, might be more daunting, since the area — squeezed between Murray Hill and the Flatiron District, with an unremarkable hodgepodge of phone stores, pharmacies and 16-story offices — does not have a catchy name, or much cachet.

Still, Mr. Achenbaum is thinking splashy, and big: a 19-story glass-and-limestone building with 225 rooms, which will cost $200 million. (The financing is being provided by HSH Nordbank, a German commercial bank, and was locked in before the current credit crisis, he said.)

A wide 150-foot-tall glass column containing light-emitting diodes will display mutating colors along the corner of the building’s facade, in a nod to four similar 15-foot columns at the Hotel Gansevoort.

Gansevoort Park’s top three floors, open to the public, will cover 8,000 square feet. They will include bars, decks and a pool, though the exact configuration is being kept secret, Mr. Achenbaum said, to prevent a competitor from trying to install a similar feature before the hotel is finished in the spring of 2009.

Guest-only areas will include a 3,500-square-foot catering space on the third floor, an outdoor deck and a 2,000-square-foot mezzanine-level spa.

A 10,000-square-foot glass-fronted restaurant space on the sidewalk level, meanwhile, will be leased by Prime One Twelve, a New York offshoot of a Miami Beach steakhouse, though Mr. Achenbaum would not discuss the terms.

He would say, though, that he hopes to get $200 a square foot in annual rent for an adjacent two-floor 1,800-square-foot retail space, preferably from a clothing store.

The hotel site, which encompasses seven parcels that wrap around the corner, now holds a series of low-slung drab buildings, with street-level tenants that include a shoe store, a French restaurant and a bank. Demolition is to start next month, Mr. Achenbaum said.

Gansevoort Park is likely to attract a different clientele than the midmarket hotels that dot the surrounding blocks. Many were built at the turn of the last century, when this neighborhood was a thriving hotel district.

Similar-size hotels, like Hotel Thirty Thirty, which offers 253 rooms at 30 East 30th Street, or the Carlton, with 316 rooms at 88 Madison Avenue, charge about $250 a night for rooms on summer weekends.

Gansevoort Park’s rooms, meanwhile, will cost about twice that.

If the Park Avenue South area is underserved by luxury hotels, so is New York City over all, and the time is right to build them, said Daniel Lesser, a senior managing director with CB Richard Ellis and a specialist in hospitality real estate.

In the last few years, conversions of hotels into condominiums have claimed more than 2,000 rooms in Manhattan, Mr. Lesser said, and the city is poised to lose almost that many more, with the imminent closing of the Hotel Pennsylvania, near Madison Square Garden, which has 1,700 rooms.

Strong demand for New York’s existing 67,000 rooms has meant an average weekly occupancy rate in the last year of 82 percent, according to Smith Travel Research, a lodging industry data provider based in Hendersonville, Tenn. In practical terms, this means weekend nights are usually completely booked, said Jan Freitag, a vice president.

By comparison, Miami, which also attracts a mix of business and leisure travelers, is filling 76 percent of its hotel rooms, while San Francisco is at 72 percent.

“Any new hotel makes sense, because the city clearly needs rooms,” said Mr. Lesser, without commenting on the Gansevoort Park specifically. “And this goes for every submarket, river to river, from 125th Street to Lower Manhattan.”

Gradually, developers seem to be responding. About 8,000 rooms are now under construction, which would be a 12 percent increase, according to Smith Travel. Some, like Gansevoort Park, are planned for traditionally underserved areas; other neighborhoods that have been identified as prime sites are the Bowery and Harlem.

Although Gansevoort Park’s developers may sell some rooms as condos, for now they are focused on making the property a round-the-clock business, they said.

It is critical, then, that they attract those who work in the area, at employers like Credit Suisse First Boston, which has large offices at 1 and 11 Madison Avenue, about five blocks away, said Nathan Gindi, vice president of Centurion Realty, which is based in Manhattan.

“We want people to come in for lunch and after work, not just check in and out,” he said. “We want this to be a destination.”
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Old August 23rd, 2007, 12:31 AM   #1097
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It looks good to me.
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Old August 23rd, 2007, 09:53 PM   #1098
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should be taller
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Old August 23rd, 2007, 10:01 PM   #1099
LLoydGeorge
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZZ-II View Post
should be taller
I'd be surprised if the developer didn't build to the maximum height allowed by the zoning regulations for that site. Why would he forego revenue from extra rooms?
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Old August 23rd, 2007, 10:04 PM   #1100
sbarn
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Don't think it should be taller... it fits into that stretch of Park Avenue quite well. I like this project!
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