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Old November 3rd, 2007, 08:10 PM   #1181
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Great new 15-25 story/lowrise structures
Horizen Hotel

Cooper Square Hotel by the same architect as Horizen's, Carlos Zapata
image hosted on flickr

The new Cooper Union class room building

The new John Jay class room building

Jean Nouvel's 11th Ave. tower

Interactive Corp's new HQ

Brooklyn Library

[IMG]http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/05/03/arts/Bam600.jpg
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WTC Station
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 09:42 PM   #1182
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I love the new station at WTC, by Santiago Calatrava.
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Old November 4th, 2007, 06:53 PM   #1183
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Glitz? There Goes the Neighborhood


The Pennsylvania Hotel.

By JAKE MOONEY
Published: November 4, 2007
nytimes.com

A little before 5 p.m. on Wednesday, as on every other weekday afternoon, the stretch of 32nd Street between Seventh Avenue and Avenue of the Americas was filled with commuters barreling westward, briefcases swinging, in a dash toward Pennsylvania Station.

Their destination — neither the Beaux-Arts Penn Station of yesteryear nor the gleaming hub outlined in new plans that were released the previous week — shares a personality with the surrounding neighborhood: utilitarian, unabashedly commercial, slightly dingy.

Like the station, that neighborhood is facing an overhaul. The Penn Station work itself would involve tearing down Madison Square Garden, building a new arena at the Farley Post Office a block to the west, and converting another a portion of the post office into part of the new train station. In addition, Merrill Lynch may move its headquarters from Lower Manhattan to the site of the Pennsylvania Hotel, across Seventh Avenue from the current train station.

A new tower replacing that historic yet threadbare hotel would join the Epic, a 59-story residential tower that opened near West 32nd Street this year, in remaking the area’s skyline.
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Old November 8th, 2007, 11:00 PM   #1184
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so many exciting projects
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Old November 9th, 2007, 10:37 PM   #1185
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http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_23...icatessan.html
Volume 20, Number 26 | The Newspaper of Lower Manhattan | November 9 - 15, 2007

Katz’s Delicatessan says sale rumors are baloney

By Lincoln Anderson

Although news articles, bloggers and neighborhood whisperings keep insisting that Katz’s Delicatessan has been bought by a developer, its owners say all the talk is, well, just chopped liver. Last Friday, when The Villager called to inquire if the legendary Lower East Side eatery indeed had been sold, co-owner Alan Dell quashed the rumors like a potato pancake.

Laughing heartily, he said, “You’re talking to the owner. No it wasn’t.”

Dell said, however, that while they would like to take advantage of the property’s copious air rights, they don’t want to do it at the cost of the historic deli.

“Basically, what we’d like to do is to build above, but keep the store below,” he said. “Business is really good. There’s no reason to end the business. We’ve been here so long, 120 years.”

As for what might someday rise above the delicatessen at E. Houston and Ludlow Sts., it possibly could be a hotel or high-end condos, but right now, Dell said, it’s all just speculation.

So is whether a future tower might take the shape of a giant all-beef hot dog — or perhaps a pastrami sandwich, the latter which could be known as The Pastrami.

Dell added they would only sell their air rights for a hefty sum, “like a stupid number — like $50 million.”

Meanwhile, he said, Katz’s is being buoyed by increased tourism from the pathetically weak U.S. dollar. While new construction in the neighborhood — like of The Ludlow, a luxury tower across the street from Katz’s — might be expected to increase business, Dell said that’s not really the deli’s bread and butter. Most of their business actually is not from the neighborhood, but from people coming from out of state and tourists, Dell said.

“What’s really helping at the moment is tourism,” he said. “After Sept. 11, the whole neighborhood closed down for a few weeks. We just brought food down to Ground Zero. Now tourism is back — though not quite like before, despite what the city is saying. We have a pretty good number of tourists. The bulk are from Britain. But also Latvia and Romania — and Thailand. Who ever heard of tourists from Thailand?”

Also helping boost sales, ironically, are regular reports of Katz’s demise. The rumor mill has really ramped up in the last six to eight months, thanks to all the false reports, he said.

“It’s really good for us,” Dell said, “because people say, ‘We’ve heard you’re closing next week.’ … They’re coming for their last fix.”
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Old November 11th, 2007, 10:35 PM   #1186
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I like those buildings that are "mineral crystal" like....
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Old November 12th, 2007, 04:08 AM   #1187
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/11/ny...ty/11rama.html
Condos Above Classrooms Strike Some as an Odd Mix

By GREGORY BEYER
Published: November 11, 2007


Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

“A religious school is playing real estate games the way Donald Trump does,” a community leader says.


HASKEL LOOKSTEIN, the rabbi of Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun and the principal of the Ramaz Lower School next door, faces a problem of overcrowding that did not exist when he was one of the school’s six inaugural pupils in 1937. Ramaz, on 85th Street near Lexington Avenue, today serves 450 students, and its space is also shared by the synagogue for various purposes. What results, members say, is a space squeeze.

For structural and aesthetic reasons, the members say, they cannot build on top of the synagogue, and so they want to transfer its air rights to the school. They then propose demolishing the school and replacing it with a 28-story tower, in which the 10 lower floors would be used for an enlarged school and the upper 18 for luxury condominiums. By selling the condo floors to a developer, supporters of the plan say, the school can defray some of the cost of rebuilding, estimated at $80 million.

Tom Blum, who leads a group called Neighbors Against Ramaz Tower, opposes this plan.

“It bothers us that a religious school is playing real estate games the way Donald Trump does,” Mr. Blum said, “not as they should be doing as a good neighbor.” He emphasized that there was unconditional support for building a new Ramaz school, but he said that the plan for a residential tower above it had come as a shock.

With the combined air rights, the tower would rise more than 100 feet above what the applicable zoning currently allows. Some neighbors, like Mr. Blum, are worried about losing their views, and although a number of local buildings are as tall as the proposed tower, few of them are midblock, as the synagogue and the school are.

Critics also say the synagogue is one of the city’s wealthiest, implying that a few hefty donations would render the residential tower unnecessary. But in the opinion of Rabbi Lookstein, the matter is not that simple. “There’s a limit to what people can give,” he said.

The city’s Board of Standards and Appeals will decide the air-rights request in the next few months. Shelly Friedman, a lawyer for Kehilath Jeshurun, has argued that the synagogue, a Gothic-style structure built in 1901 with four sets of double doors and arched stained-glass windows, is “eggshell” fragile. Building on top of it, he said, would require a daunting overhaul.

In documents submitted to the board, Mr. Friedman also said the synagogue, which is not designated as a city landmark, is nonetheless “revered for its architecture, the religious artifacts contained within and its illustrious history.”

Opponents counter that even though the synagogue never applied for landmark status, it wants the protection afforded a landmark.

The proposal may be especially troubling to synagogue members who disapprove.

“I think Ramaz went into the real estate business,” said one longtime member who spoke only on the condition of anonymity because of his relationship to the synagogue. So now, he said, despite the school’s long history in the neighborhood, “there are people wishing it would go away.”
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Old November 12th, 2007, 04:11 AM   #1188
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/11/re...ate&oref=login
The Leaning Tower of West 17th Street and Its Neighbors, Old and New

By CHRISTOPHER GRAY
Published: November 11, 2007


Tina Fineberg for The New York Times

ALONG THE BLOCK The thin vertical shaft of light shows how much 29 West 17th Street leans toward its new neighbor, Flatiron 17 at No. 31.



Office for Metropolitan History

The Goelet family’s office building that once stood at No. 9.



Office for Metropolitan History

42-46 West 17th in 1936.



Office for Metropolitan History

The block in 1949.


THERE’S the Tower of Pisa, and then there’s 29 West 17th Street, a slim little 1907 loft, 25 feet wide and 10 stories high. Now a new apartment building next door has had to shave a foot off its upper floors to accommodate its older neighbor.

In the 1850s and ’60s, the streets flanking Fifth Avenue above 14th Street were built up with comfortable brownstones, and soon the blocks were full of them. But by the 1910s, loft construction had wiped out most traces of the old brownstone period, and new construction has reached these blocks only within the last decade or so.

One example is the Hakimian Organization’s new condominium on the single lot at 31 West 17th, which will be finished early next year.

To walk down the first block of 17th Street west of Fifth Avenue is to peer back over a century and a half of New York’s architectural history. The vacant lot at 9 West 17th is the site of one of the block’s most wonderful structures, the little Dutch Renaissance-style real estate office of the powerful Goelet family. Designed by McKim, Mead & White, it was completed in 1886, a year before the family’s better-known Goelet Building at 20th and Broadway. It was torn down in 1952.

Next door is the narrow, gawky No. 11, built in 1908 and designed by Otto Strack for Edward Browning, a developer whose E. W. B. monogram is visible above the show window. This loft building was typical of the new structures that were built in the old neighborhood after 1900.

In 1913, an auction ad in The New York Times listed an inventory for one building tenant, the Charles Costume and Dress Company. It included the “latest garments made of the finest crepe de meteor, charmeuse, serges and Bedford cord,” along with sewing machines, cutting tables and a safe.

Farther up the block, a glance skyward shows that most of the 1900s loft buildings have lost their cornices. Some of the scars have been prettied up — like the one at No. 14 — but it appears that this street has not yet seen one of the full-bore restoration projects now common to other blocks in the area.

The leaning loft building at No. 29 was built in 1907, replacing a house where Howell Williams, a Wall Street merchant, lived in the 1860s. The 1870 census shows he lived there with his father and seven servants. By 1875 the house had been divided; The Times carried an ad offering a “charming suite” on the second floor and including the option of having meals served there.

On the other side of the street are Nos. 44 and 48, two surviving brownstones. They flank the picturesque Queen Anne building at No. 46 designed by Henry Congdon. Its facade of red terra cotta and molded brick is a bright spot on a block of generally more pedestrian architecture. It was built as a private house in 1890, quite late for domestic architecture on this block.

Another departure is the 1907 gray brick loft building at No. 51. This is a particularly handsome work, designed by Grosvenor Atterbury for Henry Phipps, an investor. Atterbury had also designed model tenements for Phipps, and the high level of finish and design of this building — like the bronze flagpole holder at the parapet — suggest some sort of factory demonstration project, though there is no evidence to support that idea.

The Hakimian Organization’s skinny new condo, Flatiron 17, at No. 31 is yet another work outside the normal range for this block. The prior building on the site was apparently an old row house demolished by the 1950s; perhaps that was what caused No. 29 next door to go out of plumb. By the 1990s it was leaning into the airspace of No. 31 by at least a foot, leaving a corresponding gap on the other side.

Kate Lindquist, a spokeswoman for the city’s Buildings Department, said that at some point the building stopped moving and that despite its alarming appearance, No. 29 is perfectly stable.

Adam Hakimian said that in building Flatiron 17, he and his associates had had to face a question, “How do we create this facade without being distracted by the leaning neighbor?”

Their architects, Cook & Fox, accomplished this by very subtly shaving the upper floors of the new building to provide room for the old one. It’s almost invisible, but when you notice it, you’ll smile.

Mr. Hakimian says that inside Flatiron 17, the reduction in floor space is imperceptible.

But can the same be said of the irregularity at No. 29, the leaning tower of 17th Street? Robert Pauls, who lives there, said the tilt inside his building was evident “only if you drop a marble.”

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Old November 15th, 2007, 08:11 PM   #1189
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Next to MoMA, a Tower Will Reach for the Stars


A rendering of the Jean Nouvel-designed tower to be built adjacent to the Museum of Modern Art.

By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF
Published: November 15, 2007
nytimes.com

Cass Gilbert’s Woolworth Building, William Van Alen’s Chrysler Building, Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building.

If New Yorkers once saw their skyline as the great citadel of capitalism, who could blame them? We had the best toys of all.

But for the last few decades or so, that honor has shifted to places like Singapore, Beijing and Dubai, while Manhattan settled for the predictable.

Perhaps that’s about to change.

A new 75-story tower designed by the architect Jean Nouvel for a site next to the Museum of Modern Art in Midtown promises to be the most exhilarating addition to the skyline in a generation. Its faceted exterior, tapering to a series of crystalline peaks, suggests an atavistic preoccupation with celestial heights. It brings to mind John Ruskin’s praise for the irrationality of Gothic architecture: “It not only dared, but delighted in, the infringement of every servile principle.”

Commissioned by Hines, an international real estate developer, the tower will house a hotel, luxury apartments and three floors that will be used by MoMA to expand its exhibition space. The melding of cultural and commercial worlds offers further proof, if any were needed, that Mr. Nouvel is a master at balancing conflicting urban forces.

Yet the building raises a question: How did a profit-driven developer become more adventurous architecturally than MoMA, which has tended to make cautious choices in recent years?

Like many of Manhattan’s major architectural accomplishments, the tower is the result of a Byzantine real estate deal. Although MoMA completed an $858 million expansion three years ago, it sold the Midtown lot to Hines for $125 million earlier this year as part of an elaborate plan to grow still further.

Hines would benefit from the museum’s prestige; MoMA would get roughly 40,000 square feet of additional gallery space in the new tower, which will connect to its second-, fourth- and fifth-floor galleries just to the east. The $125 million would go toward its endowment.

To its credit the Modern pressed for a talented architect, insisting on veto power over the selection. Still, the sale seems shortsighted on the museum’s part. A 17,000-square-foot vacant lot next door to a renowned institution and tourist draw in Midtown is a rarity. And who knows what expansion needs MoMA may have in the distant future?

By contrast the developer seems remarkably astute. Hines asked Mr. Nouvel to come up with two possible designs for the site. A decade ago anyone who was about to invest hundreds of millions on a building would inevitably have chosen the more conservative of the two. But times have changed. Architecture is a form of marketing now, and Hines made the bolder choice.

Set on a narrow lot where the old City Athletic Club and some brownstones once stood, the soaring tower is rooted in the mythology of New York, in particular the work of Hugh Ferriss, whose dark, haunting renderings of an imaginary Manhattan helped define its dreamlike image as the early-20th-century metropolis.

But if Ferriss’s designs were expressionistic, Mr. Nouvel’s contorted forms are driven by their own peculiar logic. By pushing the structural frame to the exterior, for example, he was able to create big open floor plates for the museum’s second-, fourth- and fifth-floor galleries. The tower’s form slopes back on one side to yield views past the residential Museum Tower; its northeast corner is cut away to conform to zoning regulations.

The irregular structural pattern is intended to bear the strains of the tower’s contortions. Mr. Nouvel echoes the pattern of crisscrossing beams on the building’s facade, giving the skin a taut, muscular look. A secondary system of mullions housing the ventilation system adds richness to the facade.

Mr. Nouvel anchors these soaring forms in Manhattan bedrock. The restaurant and lounge are submerged one level below ground, with the top sheathed entirely in glass so that pedestrians can peer downward into the belly of the building. A bridge on one side of the lobby links the 53rd and 54th Street entrances. Big concrete columns crisscross the spaces, their tilted forms rooting the structure deep into the ground.

As you ascend through the building, the floor plates shrink in size, which should give the upper stories an increasingly precarious feel. The top-floor apartment is arranged around such a massive elevator core that its inhabitants will feel pressed up against the glass exterior walls. (Mr. Nouvel compared the apartment to the pied-à-terre at the top of the Eiffel Tower from which Gustave Eiffel used to survey his handiwork below.)

The building’s brash forms are a sly commentary on the rationalist geometries of Edward Durell Stone and Philip L. Goodwin’s 1939 building for the Museum of Modern Art and Yoshio Taniguchi’s 2004 addition. Like many contemporary architects Mr. Nouvel sees the modern grid as confining and dogmatic. His tower’s contorted forms are a scream for freedom.

And what of the Modern? For some, the appearance of yet another luxury tower stamped with the museum’s imprimatur will induce wincing. But the more immediate issue is how it will affect the organization of the Modern’s vast collections.

The museum is only now beginning to come to grips with the strengths and weaknesses of Mr. Taniguchi’s addition. Many feel that the arrangement of the fourth- and fifth-floor galleries housing the permanent collection is confusing, and that the double-height second-floor galleries for contemporary art are too unwieldy. The architecture galleries, by comparison, are small and inflexible. There is no room for the medium-size exhibitions that were a staple of the architecture and design department in its heyday.

The additional gallery space is a chance for MoMA to rethink many of these spaces, by reordering the sequence of its permanent collection, for example, or considering how it might resituate the contemporary galleries in the new tower and gain more space for architecture shows in the old.

But to embark on such an ambitious undertaking the museum would first have to acknowledge that its Taniguchi-designed complex has posed new challenges. In short, it would have to embrace a fearlessness that it hasn’t shown in decades.

MoMA would do well to take a cue from Ruskin, who wrote that great art, whether expressed in “words, colors or stones, does not say the same thing over and over again.”




The interior of Jean Nouvel’s building, which is to include a hotel and luxury apartments.
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Old November 16th, 2007, 10:47 PM   #1190
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http://www.downtownexpress.com/de_236/pearlstreet.html
Volume 20, Number 27 | The Newspaper of Lower Manhattan | November 16 - 22, 2007

Pearl St. preservation effort ends with a demolition

By Julie Shapiro



Jim Teschner stood before 213 Pearl St., his home of 23 years, and looked up. He looked past the men wielding sledgehammers and chainsaws, past the shower of bricks and debris, up at the empty space where his apartment used to be.

“You look at a piece of air and go, ‘That was my home,’” Teschner said. “You realize that a home is just four walls and a ceiling.”

The four walls of Teschner’s home are gone, and the rest of the building is soon to follow — 213 Pearl St. is being demolished.

The fight to save the 1832 warehouse is all but over, and after years of legal action and battles with his landlord, all Teschner can do is watch the demolition.

“It was awful to watch,” Teschner said. “It was like going to a wake.”

The warehouse, which survived the great fire of 1835, was the last remnant of Pearl St.’s commercial heyday, a rare example of early Greek revival architecture.

The Lam Group bought the site this fall and is reportedly planning a 660-room Sheraton hotel. The Lam Group did not respond to a request for comment.

The building’s future has been shaky since developers excavating and pile driving nearby cracked the side of the facade. Last August, the Department of Buildings discovered that the building, between Maiden Ln. and Platt St., was tipping to the south, rendering it unsafe for occupancy.

“This is the last relic of Pearl St.,” said Alan Solomon, an amateur historian who has taken a keen interest in the street.

Pearl St. linked the South St. Seaport to Wall St. and became an early trade district.

“[213 Pearl St.] is part of the commercial and cultural heritage of city,” Solomon said. “It tells the story of how the city grew.”

There was more to the staid, five-story brick building than met the eye, as it was part of Pearl St.’s “horizontal skyscraper of warehouses,” Solomon said.

Solomon hoped that The Lam Group would preserve the facade of 213, just as the Rockrose Development Corp. preserved the facade of the adjacent 211 Pearl St. after the rest of the building was demolished in 2003. Rockrose, which is developing the rest of the block, originally wanted to buy 213 Pearl, but dropped the effort because of the legal complications.

The New York Landmarks Conservancy also advocated preserving the facade, but as Roger Lang, the group’s director, said, “The horse has left the barn.”

“Maintaining the facade in place is not going to be technically possible,” Lang said. “The facade itself is in pretty precarious condition.” The conservancy is now urging the developer to salvage the bricks and granite that comprise the facade, so the materials can be incorporated into the new building.

For Teschner, the latest episode in his struggle to remain in his home began as he was about to leave for work last Aug. 13. He got a frantic call from fellow tenant Colette Justine: The landlords, five policemen and two Department of Buildings employees were at the door demanding that they leave immediately.

In a regular inspection, the D.O.B. had found that the roof of the building was displaced seven-eighths of an inch to the south relative to the foundation. The building was still moving.

Teschner grabbed a few changes of clothing and left. The D.O.B. initially said it would be too dangerous for Teschner and Justine to return to the building to retrieve their belongings, but one month later, they got to go back briefly.

Teschner, an artist, removed 90 of his paintings, along with family heirlooms and whatever else he could carry. Many of his possessions — including his grandparents’ furniture — stayed behind for the demolition.

“It’s a very painful way to end one’s home,” Teschner said.

Teschner was paying $651 a month for the rent-stabilized loft, which had 17-foot ceilings, a small upstairs and a 5-by-6-foot skylight.

“It was a very, very special space,” Teschner said. “You felt like you were living outdoors.”

Now, Teschner is living with friends while he decides what to do next.

He and Justine reached a financial settlement with the landlord this fall, at the same time as the owner, Diane Karch, sold the property to The Lam Group, said Daniel Alterman, Teschner’s lawyer. Teschner and his attorney declined to say how much the settlement was worth.

“It’s difficult to preserve tenants rights in a building that’s becoming unsafe [from] the actions of a third party,” Alterman said. Once the building was cracked, “we couldn’t put Humpty-Dumpty back together again.”

Teschner’s landlord first evicted him in October 2006. When Teschner got back into the building several weeks later, Con Edison refused to restore steam to the building, so Teschner and Justine lived without heat and hot water until mid-December.

In June of 2007, Teschner took the landlord to court and won an order for the landlord to repair the building. Previously, the D.O.B. had cited the landlord for failing to make repairs.

Teschner’s case is settled, but legal action is still flying around 213 Pearl. The D.O.B. ordered Rockrose to make repairs to 213 Pearl St., after Rockrose’s construction on neighboring properties damaged the building. Rockrose complied, but then sued landlord Karch, hoping to be reimbursed, said David Rosenberg, Karch’s lawyer.

Meanwhile, Karch’s insurance company is bringing a suit against Rockrose for damages caused by the corporation’s construction, Rosenberg said.

Rockrose did not return calls for comment.

Alterman is satisfied with the outcome of the case, but thinks there is an important lesson to learn: “We have to think about how the development will affect the structure of existing housing around the development sites,” he said. “We have to make Manhattan available to not only rich people, but also artists and people who are not so rich.”

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Old November 18th, 2007, 08:11 PM   #1191
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Anyone watching the progress on the new Cooper Union building? I pass the site every Friday and Saturday when I go to work. The hole is enormous there.
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Old November 19th, 2007, 02:19 AM   #1192
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I pass there every friday aswell. I've probably seen you without knowing. Anyhow, yeah, the hole is enormous. One would think they'd be building a supertall there even though it's just a lowrise.
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Old November 19th, 2007, 07:43 AM   #1193
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Midtown is reborn
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Old November 19th, 2007, 04:38 PM   #1194
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brilliant rendering.
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Old November 19th, 2007, 10:46 PM   #1195
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/11192007...ood_444067.htm
B'KLYN H'WOOD

NAVY YARD TO BE MEGA-MOVIE LOT

By RICH CALDER


ALL 'SET': Andrew Kimball (right, with tie) and Douglas Steiner are...


overhauling the Brooklyn Navy Yard (above) to give...


Steiner Studios (above) a movie production back lot to rival those of Hollywood.

November 19, 2007 -- The Big Apple is in line to become a major Hollywood scene-stealer through a massive $100 million-plus expansion project at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Steiner Studios and its landlord, the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corp., are teaming up to transform 20 acres of gated Navy Yard land in Williamsburg that hasn't been used for decades into the stage for the first-ever Hollywood-style back lot to go up on the East Coast.

The project would expand Steiner's presence at the city-owned industrial park from 16 acres to 36 acres. The movie studio - home to the largest soundstage in the Northeast - has already hosted the production of such box-office hits as "Spider-Man 3" and Spike Lee's "Inside Man" since opening in 2004.

Douglas Steiner, the studio's chairman, said the outdoor lot would likely include a large scenic reconstruction of New York City streets, cutting down on costly street closings for city location shoots and making it easier for city-based productions to film in the Big Apple rather than head to California.

The Nassau Street site at the Navy Yard is a former medical compound. It houses majestic, historic buildings dating back to 1830 that would be renovated so they, too, could be used as scenery.

"It's a unique setting for what would become a one-of-a-kind production facility," Steiner said.

Andrew Kimball, the development corporation's president, said the project would also generate enough space to house a graduate school specializing in film/television production along with other entertainment-related uses.

Students, he said, "would benefit from studying in the heart of" the Big Apple's so-called "Hollywood East."

Steiner and the corporation are expected within the next month to begin soliciting proposals from producers interested in becoming tenants at the space.

A-list production companies, such as Imagine Films Entertainment and Warner Bros. could compete for control of the back lot. Construction on the project is expected to start in 2009.

The announcement comes as Steiner is already in the process of doubling its studio space at the Navy Yard to nearly 600,000 square feet by renovating an adjacent World War II-era seven-story building. This $50 million project would also create space for animation, wardrobe and other pre- and post-production work.

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Old November 20th, 2007, 11:11 PM   #1196
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/11202007...tap_852821.htm
GRAND (ST.) HOTEL ON TAP

DEVELOPER PUTS UP $33.37M FOR MOONDANCE DINER SITE

November 20, 2007 -- WHEN the beloved Moondance diner was famously trucked off from western SoHo to the wilds of Wyoming last summer, it was widely reported that the site at Sixth Avenue and Grand Street would be used for a luxury apartment building.

No longer.

Gary Barnett's Extell Development Corp., which owned the Moondance site and two adjacent pieces of land, has quietly sold them to Brack Capital, which plans to put up a hotel, sources report.

The purchase price, which has yet to appear in city records, was $33.37 million. Itzhaki Properties' Ivan Hakimian, who brokered the deal, could not be reached yesterday.

Sources say the developers have tentatively chosen the name 27 Grand Street for the project, which will rise on an 11,300 square-foot parcel bordered by Sixth Avenue, Grand Street and Thompson Street. The site can support 55,000 square feet of floor space as of right.

Earlier this year, Brack Capital, led by CEO Moshe Azugui, bought a parking garage on West 35th St., where it plans to build a 300-room hotel. Brack's other projects in Manhattan include the landmark 90 West St. apartment building and the Olcott at 27 W. 72d St.

*

Solved: The riddle of 2075 Broadway, aka the hot southwest corner of Broadway at 72nd Street.

After months of inactivity that mystified the neighborhood, work is about to start on the new rental apartment and retail project with a curved façade overlooking the busy corner.

Lynette Tulkoff, development director for the 19-floor, $200 million project, said excavation should start "just after Thanksgiving or even this week," with full occupancy by the end of 2009.

The long-awaited project was launched by Philips International, headed by investor Philip Pilevsky, and Rhodes NY, a privately held family company. In ad dition to the land, which they've owned for 25 years, they will own 2075 Broad way's five retail floors with 48,000 square feet.

Philips and Rhodes are also joint-venture partners in the apartment floors with the Gotham Organization, which will build the tower.

The site is across the street from the handsomely restored 72d Street IRT station at one of the best residential locations in Manhattan. But it's been an empty crater ever since demolition was completed on several small old buildings last spring.

That fueled buzz on Curbed.com and other Web sites that work was slowed because of damage to the wall of the adjacent building at 214 W. 72d St.

Not true, says Tulkoff - it was merely a matter of "teeing up" the scheme's various elements, which included air rights purchases and negotiations with Gotham, which quietly joined the project last year.

Some minor damage to the next-door building resulted from "a wall that shifted slightly," Tulkoff said, who then added, "We've had protracted discussions with them to get it resolved," Tulkoff said.

The owner of 214 W. 72d St., Peggy Ma, could not be reached yesterday.

Tulkoff said work might have started sooner, but extension of the city's 421A tax abatement program until next summer gave the partners more time.

The tower will boast 196 rental apartments. The retail space, with 22-foot-high glass storefronts, will be marketed by Robert K. Futterman, who cited "a design that offers incredible visibility." He said he's looking for "aspirational" brands from the fashion, home furnishing and technology worlds.

The project is designed by Handel Architects. Hypo Real Estate Capital is providing $70 million in debt financing. [email protected]
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Old November 24th, 2007, 11:21 PM   #1197
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a little old news but still exciting

Giant Residential Complex to Hit the Lower East Side


The Pathmark on Cherry Street on the Lower East Side.

From Curbed and NYmag

"The site is for sale for $250 million. Amazingly, not only will the Pathmark store stay in its place (perhaps following a temporary closure during construction?), but any developer who buys the land must build a 7,000-square-foot extention to the Pathmark for a new pharmacy. Excluding the one-story Pathmark building, there's about 924,000 square feet of buildable area remaining. With inclusionary housing bonuses, the total grows to 1.1 million square feet.

That's a crapload of space, so the seller has prepared two proposals for prospective buyers to show off what can be done. The first is twin 50+ story towers on top of the current Pathmark parking lot with a private entrance at Cherry and Pike Slip. The second is a 55+ story tower, also on the parking lot with an entrance at Cherry and Pike."



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Old November 24th, 2007, 11:34 PM   #1198
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Markus Dochantschi to Blend Luxury With Affordable Beside BAM



11/6/07
by: Alec Appelbaum
nymag.com

Dochantschi, working with German architect Stefan Behnisch, will design 187 units, including 30 for-sale apartments and an unspecified number of affordable ones, above a retail and performance space where Fulton Street meets Ashland (near Frank Gehry's modern explosion over the Atlantic Yards). He says the scheme scatters for-sale and low-income units throughout the tower to ensure that no one section becomes less desirable than others. Instead, as the above rendering shows (and another more clearly after the jump), he "twisted the orientation" to make sure the north-south exposure was no less enticing than the east-west. As a result, he says, "hotspots" throughout the building will ensure plenty of nice light and air. He hopes the building opens by 2010.

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Old November 24th, 2007, 11:54 PM   #1199
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amazing new projects! go NY!!!
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Old November 25th, 2007, 11:19 AM   #1200
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Krull, uttely AMAZING job on the first page , but you may wanna up the FT floor count and there are over 20 new skyscrapers missing: from that new supertall rez tower by the Sherwood Tower, to the MoMA Tower and Hudson Yards and MSG and other supertalls, to other towers like 99 Church Street, 50 West St., the SilverCup Towers, 366 10th Avenue, 11 Times Square, 5WTC, Madison Park Tower (no pictures yet), ect., ect., ect...
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