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Old November 25th, 2007, 12:45 PM   #1201
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yes, please update the first page. always impressive to see how many projects are UC in NY at the moment
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Old November 26th, 2007, 12:57 AM   #1202
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WOW!!! So MANY projects!!

This one is so thin/slender!


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Old November 26th, 2007, 11:02 PM   #1203
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on Skyscraperpage you can see pics from the construction, looks really damn thin!
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Old November 27th, 2007, 04:57 PM   #1204
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Whats the name of the thin one?
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Old November 27th, 2007, 06:52 PM   #1205
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from curbed:
Piano Plays Brooklyn With Downtown Tower
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, by Robert


To spice up this Tuesday morning, here's a rendering of the Renzo Piano-designed City Tech Tower that Bruce Ratner plans to develop at Jay and Tillary Streets in Downtown Brooklyn. We noticed it on the 110 Livingston Blog, which found it on Wired New York where a poster found it on the Artefactory website. And, here it is. The exact height of the tower is unclear, somewhere between 850 feet and 1,000 feet (with spire), give or take. It will include about 600 units of housing and 300,000 square feet of academic space for the New York City College of Technology, which currently occupies the property. Soil testing and other preliminary work has been going on at the site for a while.
To spice up this Tuesday morning, here's a rendering of the Renzo Piano-designed City Tech Tower that Bruce Ratner plans to develop at Jay and Tillary Streets in Downtown Brooklyn. We noticed it on the 110 Livingston Blog, which found it on Wired New York where a poster found it on the Artefactory website. And, here it is. The exact height of the tower is unclear, somewhere between 850 feet and 1,000 feet (with spire), give or take. It will include about 600 units of housing and 300,000 square feet of academic space for the New York City College of Technology, which currently occupies the property. Soil testing and other preliminary work has been going on at the site for a while.

[IMG]http://i7.************/6xbtc12.jpg[/IMG]
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Old November 27th, 2007, 07:47 PM   #1206
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germantower View Post
Whats the name of the thin one?
785 Eight Avenue
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Old November 28th, 2007, 08:56 AM   #1207
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WHERE'S BROOKLYN AT!!!!!!!!!!

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Old November 28th, 2007, 09:12 PM   #1208
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WOW that would be so fantastic in Brooklyn....i think that we will have a totally new NYC in just 5 years....Manhattan aswell as Brooklan will change dramatically......and even Brooklyns skyline is getting denser and denser....i am looking forward to see that everything built in 5 years......
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Old November 28th, 2007, 10:44 PM   #1209
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and don't forget jersey's skyline! i know jersey is a seperate city but its skyline is next to manhattans
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Old November 29th, 2007, 10:46 PM   #1210
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The Brooklyn video is awesome, but there is one small error..
The Media library, that triangle shaped building next to the Williamsburgh bank has been canceled by the Brroklyn Public Library due to financing problems...
Its rather unfortunate, because that was a really beautiful design and would have really changed the look of the place..
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Old November 30th, 2007, 01:02 AM   #1211
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http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/...k_tower_s.html
Williamsburgh Savings Bank clock tower still has the bright stuff

Thursday, November 29th 2007, 4:00 AM


Willamsburgh Savings Bank clock tower

The tallest building in Brooklyn shined bright Wednesday night.

For the first time since August 2006, the Willamsburgh Savings Bank clock tower lit up at sunset and blazed through the night as part of a test run.

"We are just testing it out, and are not sure when it will be lit up permanently for sure," said spokeswoman Barbara Wagner of Dermot Co., which has been restoring the clock tower.

The clock's hands slowly swept around yesterday, giving the illusion of telling the correct time, but will remain at 12 o'clock when they complete their rotation.

Dermot Co. already has spent $1 million fixing the 80-year-old clock's face, which was covered in black mesh for nearly two years. The 37-story former office building has been in the process of being converted to luxury condos since 2005.

"It's good to see it lit up again, even though it's only for one night," said Julie Sutton, 42, of Prospect Heights.

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Old November 30th, 2007, 01:03 AM   #1212
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http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/..._for_dorm.html
Community board opposed to plan for dorm, tower in Hunters Point

BY DONALD BERTRAND
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Wednesday, November 28th 2007, 4:00 AM

A plan to build a six-story grad school dormitory and a 13-story residential tower across from the massive Queens West development in Hunters Point is meeting with stiff opposition from the local community board.

This month, the land use committee of Queens Community Board 2 unanimously voted to reject a Board of Standards and Appeals variance application for the dorm, which would house 220 CUNY Graduate School students, and the apartment tower, with a planned 169 units and ground floor retail.

"Dormitory housing in itself is transient housing at its best and offers no stability to the community. We believe that it is a detriment to the growth of Hunters Point," said Board 2 Chairman Joseph Conley in a letter to the BSA.

But Howard Goldman, attorney for O'Connor Capital, the developer, said it is the dorm that is driving the project, which is slated to be located on 47th Ave. at Fifth St.

"Like many other institutions in the city, they [CUNY Graduate School] have a need for affordable housing for their graduate students," he said.

The site, said Goldman, "seems like a good candidate because it is just across the river [from the Manhattan-based grad school] and relatively accessible by subway."

Saying that he understood the community board's "concerns about the size and density of the project," nevertheless, the attorney said, the project's neighbors are much bigger.

"The project is basically across the street from Queens West, where you have 30- to 40-story towers, and is one block south of a proposed high-rise development, Anable Basin, that has been in discussion for a couple years now," he said.

"From our point of view, it is not as if we are taking a block in a low-rise area and building taller buildings," said Goldman, adding that between Queens West and the proposed Anable Basin project, the "dormitory project will be dwarfed."

According to a spokesman for the Board of Standards and Appeals, the dormitory project is still being studied, and a hearing date for it has not even been set.

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Old November 30th, 2007, 01:04 AM   #1213
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http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/...rage_by-1.html
Flushing Commons changes spur outrage by local leaders

BY JESS WISLOSKI
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Tuesday, November 27th 2007, 4:00 AM

The blueprints are changing and the cost is rising to $800 million for a mixed-use building scheduled for construction on a sprawling municipal parking lot in Flushing.

The developers of Flushing Commons — which community leaders promoted in 2005 based on a rosy early proposal for the 5-acre city property — are revising their most recent plans following a burst of outrage from local leaders.

"The project is at a standstill right now, at best; at worst, [it's] dead in the water," Councilman John Liu (D-Flushing) said this week.

Since February, Liu and other leaders have criticized the developers, TDC Development and the Rockefeller Group, for tossing out plans for a 50,000-square-foot community center on the site to be run by the YMCA.

The original plan called for the site to include 2,000 city-subsidized parking spots.

The developers, citing spiraling costs, have since *approached the YMCA about revising plans. The parking subsidy was jettisoned, and new plans call for 1,600 spots, but without a subsidy.

A spokesman for the YMCA of Greater New York confirmed that plans are tentatively back on track for the facility.

"The YMCA has been actively talking with the *developers," said spokesman Kevin Shermach, who said they're still trying "to see if the project's design and space could accommodate a YMCA."

Liu says the youth center alone wouldn't cut it for his nod, and said he wants the parking fees limited and space increased as well.

"The developer was inexplicably thinking they could rule out the public amenities that had been agreed upon," he said.

Projects must be approved through the city's *uniform land use review process (ULURP) which calls for community input.

Construction costs have risen since 2005, and the estimated cost for the project has gone up $300 million from an original $500 million projection.

The project now boasts 325,000 square feet for "local and national retail shops," restaurants and a movie theater but tosses the 35,000 square feet earlier reserved for "small professional businesses" and "community or cultural tenants."

Jamie Van Bramer, a spokesman for Flushing Commons, denied the project was at a standstill. He said revisions were being planned that will be released in the "near future."

"We have been working diligently with our partners in the EDC to work out the details on a development plan that we are confident both respects our original Flushing Commons vision and is wholly achievable within this ever-changing economic environment," Van Bramer said.

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Old November 30th, 2007, 01:07 AM   #1214
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http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...al-for-change/
November 29, 2007, 1:43 pm

A Brick Facade Remains as a Signal for Change

By David W. Dunlap


The old brick building at 211 Pearl Street.

(Photo: David W. Dunlap/The New York Times)



A rendering of the new apartment building at Maiden Lane and Pearl Street.

And then there was one. Or rather, the brick facade of one.

Looking like “Ye Old New-York” set on a Hollywood back lot, 211 Pearl Street is now all that survives of a triptych of 19th-century mercantile buildings that stood until recent years between Maiden Lane and Platt Street.

This month, 213 Pearl Street was reduced to rubble to make way for a hotel being planned by John Lam, a New York developer. The building at No. 215 was torn down last year.

But the facade of No. 211 — a five-story counting house completed in 1832 for William Colgate, the founder of what is now Colgate-Palmolive — was preserved in 2004 as part of the construction of a residential tower at 2 Gold Street by the Rockrose Development Corporation. There are three mysterious shapes in the brickwork.

The counting house will not remain an orphan long in Lower Manhattan. Rockrose is planning a 28-story apartment building at Maiden Lane and Pearl Street that will abut the facade of No. 211. Part of the new building will be constructed directly behind the surviving facade. There will be apartments behind the old fourth- and fifth-floor windows and a double-height space behind the second- and third-floor windows that could be used for offices, a school or a store. (Maybe a Colgate boutique?) The base of the building will continue to serve as an entrance to an underground garage.

Along Pearl Street, the facade of the new building will be 60 feet high and clad in red brick, said Jon McMillan, the director of planning for Rockrose. Its windows will have proportions like those at No. 211, he said, with limestone sills and lintels. He said the facade treatment had been “carefully worked out” with the New York State Historic Preservation Office. (The rest of the new building will be closer aesthetically to 2 Gold Street.)

Rockrose once owned No. 215 and was required by the state preservation office to reconstruct it, Mr. McMillan said; an obligation that was transferred to Mr. Lam. But No. 213 was not covered by that obligation, Mr. McMillan said.

When it was demolished three weeks ago, the New York Landmarks Conservancy tried to reach Mr. Lam to persuade him to salvage and reuse some architectural details from No. 213. Peg Breen, the conservancy president, said Mr. Lam had not yet responded. “But they did save lintels, et cetera,” she said, “and we’ll continue to try.”
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Old November 30th, 2007, 01:09 AM   #1215
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http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...loper-at-last/
November 27, 2007, 5:59 pm

Historic Harlem Theater Gets a Developer, at Last

By Charles V. Bagli


A rendering of the new retail and residential complex planned for 125th Street in Harlem. (Image: Empire State Development Corporation)

After years of delay and political squabbling, state officials have selected Danforth Development Partners to redevelop the long-vacant Victoria Theater on 125th Street, once Harlem’s largest and most elegant theater. Danforth plans to transform the Victoria, which sits a couple of doors east of its more well-known sister, the Apollo Theater, into a cultural center, with two live theaters and space for the Jazz Museum of Harlem, along with a hotel and 91 condominium apartments.

The new space would include a 199-seat Classical Theater of Harlem and a 99-seat theater for the Harlem Arts Alliance. Danforth, a Harlem-based developer that owns the commercial building on 125th Street that houses the offices of former President Bill Clinton, said it would preserve and restore the Victoria’s Ionic columns, terra cotta rosettes and other historic elements.

The Harlem Community Development Corporation gave preliminary approval to the deal last month, and is scheduled to finalize the agreement on Monday.

The Victoria is to become a 317,570-square-foot mixed-use complex and underground parking garage. The development would include 40,500-square-foot cultural arts center, a 170- to 200-room hotel and a 91-unit residential condominium. In addition to the two theaters, the cultural center will also include 10,150 square feet for the primary use of the Jazz Museum in Harlem, and 4,000 square feet of office space for the Apollo Theater.
The selection of Danforth follows a three-year process, much of which involved getting reassurances from the developer that the project would include minority subcontractors, jobs for Harlem residents and housing for low- and moderate-income tenants.

Several politicians, including Representative Charles B. Rangel, Assemblyman Keith L. T. Wright and the Manhattan borough president, Scott M. Stringer, praised the announcement in a statement issued by the Empire State Development Corporation, the Harlem Community Development Corporation’s parent agency. The Harlem subsidiary was created in 1995.

Sewell Chan contributed reporting.
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Old November 30th, 2007, 11:08 PM   #1216
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New Look for the New Museum


The New Museum of Contemporary Art
From the sidewalk, onlookers inspect the lobby and facade of this seven-story structure on the Lower East Side, which opens tomorrow.


By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF
Published: November 30, 2007

New York is in the cultural doldrums. The city is bursting with gorgeous art exhibitions, but where is the raw energy? Where is the new blood, intent on upending the establishment? Today, once-rebellious talents often seem to be wandering lost in the constellation of celebrity, where they soon settle into complacency.

Designed by the Japanese firm Sanaa, the New Museum of Contemporary Art, on the Bowery at Prince Street on the Lower East Side, is the kind of building that renews your faith in New York as a place where culture is lived, not just bought and sold.

The architects, Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, conceived the building as a series of mismatched galleries precariously stacked one atop the other. It succeeds on a spectacular range of levels: as a hypnotic urban object, as a subtle critique of the art world and as a refreshingly unpretentious place to view art.

But what elevates the building itself to art is the way it captures an unnerving moment in the city’s cultural history with near-perfect pitch. Its ethereal forms hover somewhere between the legacy of a fading bohemian downtown and the ravenous appetites of a society awash in new money. That the building is so artfully rooted in the present means that its haunting quality will probably deepen as the city ages around it.

Ms. Sejima and Mr. Nishizawa may have seemed unlikely candidates to shake up the establishment. The pair is known for work of a high level of refinement and an almost aching sensitivity to a project’s social and physical context. (more...)


Exterior of the New Museum of Contemporary Art, on the Lower East side.

killer presentation - http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...M_GRAPHIC.html
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Old December 1st, 2007, 12:27 AM   #1217
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/30/ny...ion&oref=login
Tower Planned Atop Port Authority Bus Terminal in New Wave of Development

By CHARLES V. BAGLI
Published: November 30, 2007

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has revived plans to build a sleek 40-story office tower over the north wing of the West Side bus terminal at the suddenly hot intersection of Eighth Avenue and 42nd Street.

Under the terms of a deal worth as much as half a billion dollars, which will be announced this morning, officials and real estate executives say a joint venture of Vornado Realty Trust and the Lawrence Ruben Company will erect a deck over the existing four-story bus terminal on which they will build the 1.3-million-square-foot office tower.

Much of the money from the sale of the development rights would be used to refurbish the entire Port Authority Bus Terminal, an aging and gloomy structure that stretches from 40th to 42nd Street between Eighth and Ninth Avenues. The terminal’s exterior would be given a major face-lift and 18 bus platforms would be added, along with retail space and improved interior circulation for the 200,000 commuters who use the building daily.

The Port Authority, Gov. Eliot Spitzer and the developer will attend a news conference at the bus terminal today to unveil the deal. Officials were reluctant to provide details before then.

“We’ve been working very hard to reach an agreement that leverages substantial private money to reinvest for the benefit of our customers, the neighborhood and the region,” said Stephen Sigmund, a spokesman for the Port Authority.

There is certainly plenty going on at this once sleepy crossroad. Across Eighth Avenue from the terminal’s north wing, SJP Properties is building a 40-story office tower. Another tower is in the works on the north side of 42nd Street, just west of Eighth Avenue, where 1199 S.E.I.U. United Healthcare Workers East, the hospital workers’ union, is close to selecting a developer for its property, which comprises three adjoining parcels that extend to 43rd Street.

And farther north, Local 6 of the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union is about to put its property — the entire blockfront between 44th and 45th Streets, on the west side of Eighth Avenue — on the market. Like 1199, that union wants to remain in place but take advantage of the real estate market to raise money.

The New York Times recently completed its new tower on Eighth Avenue, opposite the bus terminal’s south wing.

A number of residential buildings are being built on Eighth Avenue north of 42nd Street.

The plan to build over the bus terminal first emerged nearly a decade ago. At that time, the construction boom was one block east, in then-dowdy Times Square, where Broadway intersects Seventh Avenue and 42nd Street. The Condé Nast tower, at 4 Times Square, was followed by the Reuters Building, two other office towers, new restaurants, movie theaters and nightclubs.

By 1999, the Port Authority offered to sell the development rights over the bus terminal and eventually selected Vornado and the Ruben Company to build a 37-story tower and renovate the north wing in an attempt to smooth commuters’ passage. In return, the developer was to pay more than $110 million.

There was a tentative deal to build a headquarters for Cisco Systems, but the dot-com boom collapsed in 2000, along with plans for the tower. Litigation ensued between the developer and the Port Authority.

Nevertheless, residential developers began pushing westward to 12th Avenue with rental apartments and even condominiums, which would have been unthinkable only five years earlier.

Last year, Anthony Coscia, the chairman of the Port Authority, revived discussions with Steven Roth, the chairman of Vornado, about the project, which is subject to approval at the Port Authority’s Dec. 18 board meeting.

Under the terms of the deal, the developer would get the development rights under a 99-year lease in return for providing the Port Authority with annual rent payments, a percentage of the revenue and a small stake in the project. Two executives who have been briefed on the terms said the deal was worth $400 million to $500 million.

The developer plans to hold an architectural competition for the building’s design, an official said.

Vornado and the Ruben Company have a year to complete their plans and four years to build the tower, according to officials. Vornado, in partnership with the Durst Organization, is also bidding for the 26-acre development over the West Side railyards, and in a separate partnership with the Related Companies is proposing the $14 billion transformation of the Penn Station area, which includes building a new Penn Station, demolishing Madison Square Garden and building a ring of office towers on the surrounding land.
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Old December 1st, 2007, 03:40 AM   #1218
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The Brooklyn tower is beautiful.
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Old December 5th, 2007, 04:01 AM   #1219
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/12032007...lyn_403107.htm
HIP HOTEL ON RISE IN B'KLYN

By RICH CALDER


HOTEL INDIGO:

Vision of coolness


December 3, 2007 -- Here's the latest vision for a hip new boutique hotel coming soon to Downtown Brooklyn.

Long Island City-based V3 Hotel is planning to break ground Dec. 11 on the $60 million, 23-story Hotel Indigo on Duffield Street featuring 180 amenity-rich rooms, a rooftop bar, a swanky restaurant and 17,000 square feet of new retail.

"This is definitely a higher-end hotel than what we're used to seeing in Brooklyn," said V3 CEO Ben Nash.

The project is just part of 1,973 new hotel rooms slated to come to the borough's downtown area by 2012 - and that doesn't include another 225 hotel rooms expected to be built within the long-delayed Brooklyn Bridge Park project, records show.

Currently, the only major hotel serving the downtown area is the 637-room New York Marriott on Adams Street.

Joe Chan, president of the public-private Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, said building a new hotel in the Big Apple was once considered trendy only if it was below 96th Street in Manhattan but that has changed citywide - "especially in Brooklyn, which has become a tourist destination in itself."

He noted planned draws like an arena for the NBA's Nets and the expansion of the Brooklyn Academy of Music Cultural District.

But not everyone is enamored with the hotel projects.

"We don't need hotels for rich people from out of town; we need services for our community," said Diana Smith, a Fort Greene resident and board member for Families United for Racial and Economic Equality.

Designed by renowned architect Karl Fischer, the Hotel Indigo is expected to be complete in late 2009.

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Old December 5th, 2007, 11:13 PM   #1220
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/05/re...l?ref=nyregion
Stalled Brooklyn Arts District Regains Momentum

By TERRY PRISTIN
Published: December 5, 2007


Studio MDA and Behnisch Architects, rendering by ESKQ

The $385 million project, which will create a cultural district around the Brooklyn Academy of Music, will have mixed-income apartments, retailing and cultural spaces.



Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

Carlton A. Brown, a developer, was chosen to lead the team that will build it.


For years, Harvey Lichtenstein, the impresario who turned the Brooklyn Academy of Music into an internationally known site for innovative productions, has dreamed of transforming the parking lots near BAM into a cultural district reminiscent of the Left Bank in Paris.

As exciting as this vision seemed to many residents of the rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods near BAM, it also stirred fears among longtime Brooklynites of a Manhattan-oriented enclave, where local artists would be snubbed. A recent decision by city officials may help to quiet some of those anxieties — and may finally give the long-stalled arts district some momentum.

Last month, Carlton A. Brown, a Harlem-based developer with deep roots in Brooklyn, was chosen to lead the team that will build the cultural district’s centerpiece. The $385 million project, on city-owned land at Ashland Place and Fulton Street, opposite BAM’s Harvey Theater, will have a residential tower with 187 units of mixed-income housing, 4,000 square feet of retailing and a 40,000-square-foot choreographic center to be anchored by the Danspace Project, a 35-year-old organization that presents dance performances.

Mr. Brown’s company, Full Spectrum, will develop the project with two architectural firms: Studio MDA of New York and Behnisch Architects of Stuttgart, Germany.

Letitia James, the City Council member who represents the Fort Greene neighborhood that includes BAM, said she lobbied hard for Mr. Brown, who is African-American. “We are experiencing a renaissance in downtown Brooklyn,” Ms. James said. “But there has been a notable absence of developers of color.”

Full Spectrum’s proposals also gained an edge among the field of six applications because half the units will be for low- and moderate-income tenants and because the unusual design will allow abundant air and natural light to flow through the residential tower, said Seth Donlin, a spokesman for the city Department of Housing Preservation and Development.

Though construction of the Danspace project is not expected to begin until 2009, officials of the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, a nonprofit group created last year to accelerate the process, say the designation of a developer is one of several signs that the cultural district is finally moving forward.

Work is scheduled to begin early next year on the 299-seat Theater for a New Audience at Lafayette and Ashland Avenues, which was designed by Hugh Hardy and Frank Gehry. And the design process for a nearby 30,000-square-foot plaza is under way.

“Every project that has been committed to publicly is now on a finite design- and-construction timeline,” said Joe Chan, the president of the partnership. “You’ve also got a city administration that is operating with an increased sense of urgency.” The city has pledged $100 million through 2011 to the BAM cultural district, Mr. Chan said.

Mr. Brown’s company has extensive experience building subsidized housing, using complex low-income housing tax-credit programs and other incentives, but Danspace will be his first project in Brooklyn. Other Full Spectrum developments include two mixed-income condominiums at 116th Street and Fifth Avenue in Harlem — 1400 on Fifth and the Kalahari Harlem — and the Solaire in Battery Park City, which was hailed as one of the nation’s first environmentally sustainable residential buildings.

Raised in Jackson, Miss., where his company also has an office, Mr. Brown has lived in the borough for three decades. He has also played a role in Brooklyn’s cultural life as the chairman of Arts 651, a local nonprofit organization that focuses on art by descendants of African slaves. He was active in the coalition of community groups that raised concerns about Mr. Lichtenstein’s vision of the cultural district.

“The community saw themselves as a creative place with a lot of artists,” Mr. Brown said. “We just didn’t have the resources that we needed. Harvey thought you needed to bring in people from Manhattan — that there were not enough people to support visionary, cutting-edge arts.”

Mr. Lichtenstein, however, said it was mainly a lack of money that had slowed the arts district. “The turning point has been the administration’s putting much more emphasis on development of downtown Brooklyn,” he said.

The selection of Mr. Brown is not going to mollify all of the community’s fears about gentrification, said Brad Lander, director of the Pratt Center for Community Development, a Brooklyn-based organization. “But it does make a real difference when folks see development that strengthens cultures and values of diverse communities,” he said.

Mr. Brown said his partners had designed a model for urban living by integrating residential space aimed at different income levels with open space. “It takes an elongated Brooklyn street and stands on its end,” he said in an interview at his spartan office in Central Harlem. Of the apartments, 20 percent will be for low-income residents and 30 percent for residents who earn 80 percent to 130 percent of the area’s median income. The dance space, which will be turned over to the city, will be adjacent to the tower.

The tower will be five cantilevered blocks of apartments ranging in height from 6 to 14 floors. No resident will be more than six floors away from a shared terrace, said Markus Dochantschi and David Salazar, who met while working in London for the architect Zaha Hadid and later started their own firm, Studio MDA. The architects said that by breaking up the project into several midrise structures, they hoped to create a more neighborly and pride-instilling atmosphere than tenants might find in a large high-rise.

To finance the project, Mr. Brown said he intended to use “every form of subsidy you can find.” Goldman Sachs, Full Spectrum’s financial partner in the Kalahari, also expects to invest in the Danspace project, said Alicia Glen, managing director of Goldman’s urban investment group.

Even before the finishing touches have been put on the design, however, the project has encountered a public-relations headache.

At the corner of the site is a former liquor store that was leased in 2005 to three young residents of Fort Greene and nearby Clinton Hill who planned to open a nightclub and recording studio called Amber Art and Music Space.

In August, just weeks before their planned opening — and after they say they had invested $1.2 million — the city told them that the building would be condemned if the landlord did not agree to sell it, said Todd N. Triplett, one of the partners. “This took us completely by surprise,” he said, adding that the partners had received 7,000 e-mail messages of support. Amber has not opened.

Their broker, Eva M. Daniels, who owns a real estate company that bears her name, said the plans came as news to her as well. “If we’d been aware of it, we never would have shown the building,” Ms. Daniels said. The landlord, Juan Lopez, could not be reached.

Mr. Chan, however, said the city had made it clear for years that the site was earmarked for cultural uses and mixed-income housing. “This has been a very transparent process,” he said.
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