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Old January 24th, 2008, 10:31 PM   #1281
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reminds me of Park Fifth.

Only it's built around the structure, not over it.
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Old January 26th, 2008, 04:30 AM   #1282
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The reason they are doing it that way was probably b/c the owner of that building didn't want to sell out to the developer originally.
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Old January 30th, 2008, 02:34 AM   #1283
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/01292008...ost_297071.htm
HUDSON SQUARE BOOST

LUXURY HOTEL IS PLANNED FOR FORMER WAREHOUSE SITE

January 29, 2008 -- THE Hudson Square area has long had a fuzzy identity - north of TriBeCa, West of SoHo, and still associated in many local minds with its printing industry past.

In recent years, of course, the district's largest landowner, Trinity Real Estate, has created 6 million square feet of office space in buildings once used as warehouses and factories, and lured creative-industry tenants including Viacom.

Some say the neighborhood doesn't yet have enough hip amenities, but that appears to be changing.

Tribeca Associates, which netleased the 8-story former warehouse at 330 Hudson St. from Trinity last year, has launched a $220 million redevelopment that will yield a 22-story building shown on this page for the first time.

It will be topped with a 170-room luxury hotel and boast a 5,000 square-foot restaurant.

Tribeca principal William Brodsky said 330 Hudson, between Van Dam and Charleston streets, will offer a total 300,000 square feet of offices in the existing 8 stories and two new office floors above them.

"It could be the only opportunity in Manhattan for this type of product," Brodsky said - "a block of that size with the creative feel of a brick loft."

Cushman & Wakefield's Andrew Peretz, the project's leasing agent, said it was too early to discuss asking rents, but he noted, "We're dead-center in the midst of the new Hudson Square creative district."

The hotel, to be run by an operator yet to be announced, will be designed by Brennan Beer Gorman architects with inte riors by Yabu Pushelberg, the firm that also did the Times Square W.

Brodsky said office tenants could take posses sion as early as next January and the hotel will be open by the end of 2009.
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Old February 1st, 2008, 03:23 AM   #1284
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http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/31/ny...on&oref=slogin
Office Tower to Rise in Harlem for Baseball TV Network

By CHARLES V. BAGLI
Published: January 31, 2008


Swanke Hayden Connell

A proposed building at 125th Street and Park Avenue.


Major League Baseball plans to build a home on 125th Street, Harlem’s premier boulevard, for its cable network, which is scheduled to make its debut early next year with some 50 million subscribers, real estate and baseball executives said on Wednesday.

The planned building, to be developed by Vornado Realty Trust, would rise 21 stories in an interlocking set of luminescent glass cubes at 125th Street and Park Avenue and would be the first prime office tower to be built in Harlem in more than three decades.

Vornado is also negotiating with Inner City Broadcasting, the second-largest radio broadcasting company aimed at black listeners, to move to the planned tower from its Midtown offices, according to real estate executives and local officials.

The Vornado project is an expression of how sky-high rents in Midtown Manhattan have contributed to Harlem’s renaissance, pushing residential developers in particular to build in the once economically struggling community. The Vornado project, to be called Harlem Park, would be the first major office tower in the area since the construction of the State Office Building, also on 125th Street, in the early 1970s.

But Vornado still has hurdles to cross, and if the project advances, it would not be the first to hold a groundbreaking at the site. Three years ago, Gov. George E. Pataki and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg held a press conference there in anticipation of a $236 million hotel and retail project that never materialized.

Vornado is seeking an exception to proposed rezoning that would impose height restrictions on buildings along 125th Street before it starts construction in the spring, and Major League Baseball is negotiating with the city for an incentive package. Some elected officials are also seeking assurances that the project will provide jobs for local residents and will not displace small businesses in the area.

“We want to know about jobs and we want to protect indigenous businesses,” said city Councilwoman Inez E. Dickens, whose district includes the site, now a vacant lot.

Still, city officials are optimistic that a national developer like Vornado and a major tenant like Major League Baseball will propel the project forward.

“Harlem Park will be the area’s first Class-A office tower in decades and will attract major tenants, showcasing the economic growth under way in Harlem,” said Robert C. Lieber, the deputy mayor for economic development. “We’re still negotiating with Vornado and Major League Baseball, and if we are able to get it done, it will be a home run for the entire area.”

Real estate executives said that Major League Baseball was completing negotiations to lease about one-fifth of the planned 630,000-square-foot building. That would include the second and third floors for broadcast studios and editing, as well as the top two floors of the tower for the network’s executive and sales offices.

The area around Park Avenue is still frayed and has not seen as much development as other stretches of 125th Street. But Harlem has changed dramatically.

The average price for new apartments in Harlem has hit $895,000. The historic Apollo Theater on 125th Street is in the midst of a $96 million restoration and expansion. Two hotels are under development nearby, and national retailers like Old Navy, Starbucks and Sony Theaters have moved onto the boulevard. Columbia University has plans for a new $7 billion campus on 17 acres to the west.

Vornado took over the site at Park Avenue last year, after the hotel project died. The company said then that it viewed the spot as ideal for a commercial tower because it sits close to a subway stop, a Metro-North train stop and what will be the northern terminus of the Second Avenue subway. It has nearby highway access to the airports and has nostalgic appeal because it is also less than two miles south of 155th Street and the former site of the Polo Grounds, where the New York Giants played, and Yankee Stadium, in the Bronx.

Vornado hired Swanke Hayden Connell Architects. But it still needed a blue-chip anchor tenant for the project in order to begin construction. And Major League Baseball, which wanted to enter the lucrative world of cable television, needed space.

The league’s new network, like the channels already operated by the National Basketball Association, the National Football League and the National Hockey League, will offer a mix of live games, studio-based shows and archival, fantasy and reality programming. League-owned networks are vehicles to appeal to fans who want the type of concentrated fix on a single sport that they cannot get from ESPN or the local channels that carry teams’ games.

Unlike the N.F.L., baseball chose not to wage a protracted fight against cable operators to extend its subscriber rolls; it ensured major distribution by giving Comcast, Time Warner and Cox shares in the network that total 16.67 percent, the same stake that had already been provided to DirecTV for being the first to agree to carry the channel. Because of that deal, the baseball network is expected to be one of the most successful start-ups in television history.

After searching for space in Manhattan, Queens and New Jersey, the league’s broker, CB Richard Ellis, brought it to the Vornado project on 125th Street, where proposed rents are half those of similar buildings in Midtown. Tenants could also get tax breaks. Since Vornado does not expect to complete the tower until 2010, Major League Baseball has found temporary space in Secaucus, N.J.

The city is set to rezone 125th Street and restrict building heights in such a way that the tower would be about 40 feet too tall. The company is hoping for an exemption.

But local officials are also concerned that the current wave of gentrification is displacing not only longtime residents, but also small businesses on 125th Street that had stuck it out through the bad times in Harlem.

Major League Baseball’s decision “is an exciting way that they can deepen their relationship with the African and Hispanic communities,” said Robert J. Rodriguez, chairman of Community Board 11. “We’re interested in seeing how that develops. As a community, we recognize how an office development could add vibrancy to the surrounding community. But we remain concerned about how this development proceeds and about jobs for local residents.”

Richard Sandomir contributed reporting.
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Old February 1st, 2008, 10:13 PM   #1285
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very cool design !!
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Old February 2nd, 2008, 01:52 AM   #1286
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http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2008...ite_plans.html
Developers unveil Domino site plans

By VERONIKA BELENKAYA and LEO STANDORA
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS

Friday, February 1st 2008, 4:00 AM

At a meeting that was both sweet and sour, developers presented their vision for an ultramodern housing complex at the Domino Sugar refinery site in Brooklyn Thursday night.

CPC Resources Inc. unveiled renderings of the ambitious project, which calls for six buildings with the landmarked refinery - topped by a five-story glass-faced addition - as its centerpiece.

The 400,000-square-foot complex is designed to provide 2,200 housing units - 30% of them "affordable" - 1,500 indoor parking spaces and a first floor devoted to retail outlets.

While most at the Community Board 1 meeting welcomed the prospect of more housing for low- and middle-income families, some frowned on the design, calling it too boxy and too big for the Williamsburg waterfront neighborhood.

The city's Landmarks Preservation Commission will start examining the renderings next week.
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Old February 5th, 2008, 11:59 PM   #1287
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/02052008...ece_101977.htm
MIDTOWN MASTERPIECE

SKIDMORE OWINGS & MERRILL'S BOSTON PROPERTIES TOWER UNVEILED


UNVEILING;New 250 W. 55th St

February 5, 2008 -- MIDTOWN'S biggest development puzzle is a mystery no more.

The image at right shows the first rendering of the West Side's most buzzed-over, blogged-about new skyscraper - Boston Properties' 1 million square-foot office tower at Eighth Avenue between 54th and 55th streets, to be known as 250 W. 55th St.

The design by Skidmore Owings & Merrill's Chris Cooper has not been previously released. It calls for a glass curtain-wall tower of 39 stories, set back from the avenue atop a graciously proportioned base boasting a 57 foot-high, wraparound glass retail façade and 25,000 square feet of stores.

Excavation and demolition of smaller buildings on the site are underway and Boston says tenants will be able to move into its new project by January 2010.

Publicly traded Boston, led by Mort Zuckerman, finished assembling the site last year, and real estate circles have mused ever since over its plans for the once low-rise block.

Boston bought the land from developer Robert Gladstone, who previously acquired it from Hearst and from a local family for a total of around $200 million. In a recent filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Boston pegged its total investment in the project at $910 million.

Law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher has signed a lease for 220,000 square feet on its upper floors; a deal with law firm Proskauer, Rose for between 500,000 and 600,000 square feet is pending. CB Richard Ellis is the leasing agent.

To complete its assemblage, Boston is buying air rights from Broadway's Shubert Organization. Sources said that deal has received the blessing of the Department of City Planning, paving the way for the sale to go through and for construction to begin once the site is completely razed.

Eighth Avenue has now become an unlikely architectural showcase with recent completions of Sir Norman Foster's Hearst headquarters at 57th Street, Renzo Piano's New York Times Co. tower at 41st Street, and Arquitectonica's Westin Hotel at 43rd Street.

Meanwhile, Stephen Pozycki's SJP Properties' 40-story 11 Times Square, designed by FX Fowle, has begun to rise at the southeast corner of 42nd Street, and Jay Eisaenstadt is completing a 43-story condo at 47th Street designed by Ismael Leyva.

But until now, the Boston project remained shrouded in mystery as the company negoti ated simulta neously with the Shuberts, pro spective office tenants and a handful of resi dential tenants still living at the site.

*

The most closely watched office tenant in town is Newsweek, which must soon exit beat-up 1775 Broadway - which owner Joseph Moinian plans to re-clad and reposition as a Class-A office address known as 3 Columbus Circle.

Newsweek has about 250,000 square feet there now. Its lease is up this summer. The magazine has been talking to the Sapir Organization about a move to 100 Church St. downtown, right next to Larry Silverstein's planned new Four Seasons Hotel project.

The Sapir building has a rare available block of 500,000 square feet, with asking rents a modest $43-$48 per square foot.

Sources said there's a lease out between Sapir and Newsweek, although a signing does not appear imminent.

CB Richard Ellis, which represents both sides, had no comment.

[email protected]
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Old February 6th, 2008, 12:03 AM   #1288
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http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/03/ny...ml?ref=thecity
Here Come the Babies. There Go the Jackhammers.

By ALEX MINDLIN
Published: February 3, 2008


Angela Jimenez for The New York Times

In a growing Hasidic neighborhood, double strollers, followed by a construction boom.


JACOB GOLDSTEIN, the longtime chairman of Community Board 9 and the unofficial mayor of Crown Heights, Brooklyn, was driving his little red Ford Contour through the neighborhood the other day, honking at acquaintances. Several times on every block, he braked and gestured at a newly risen, salmon-colored apartment building, or a plywood fence protecting a construction site.

“This community’s exploding,” Mr. Goldstein, who is Hasidic, said with satisfaction. “The young people are having kids. My kids are having kids. They need places to live.”

The southern portion of Crown Heights is the nerve center of the Lubavitch sect of Hasidic Judaism, and it has long been as much dormitory as neighborhood. The area attracts Lubavitch adherents from around the world, who tend to raise large families; households of five or six children are common. Everything but the Baby, a children’s store on the neighborhood artery, Kingston Avenue, sells more than twice as many double strollers as singles.

Over the past two years, community expansion has fueled a building boom: a spate of new condominium buildings, almost all of them aimed at Orthodox buyers. The new apartments typically have at least three bedrooms along with two sinks, two stoves and two kitchen counters — one for meat and one for dairy, to comply with kosher dietary law. Some buildings have so-called Sabbath elevators that allow residents to reach their floors on Saturdays without pressing a button, an action that is traditionally forbidden.

Although there are no precise figures on the number of new buildings, a spokeswoman for the Department of Buildings said that last year the agency issued more than five times as many permits for new construction in Community District 9 as it had five years ago. (Citywide, the 2002 figure was 3 percent higher.)

J. J. Katz, the principal broker at Heights Properties, a local real estate brokerage, said he knew of about 50 new buildings aimed at Orthodox buyers. “Even two years ago,” he said, “there was only one building project going on at a time.”

The largest new project is a nearly complete 94-unit building at 580 Crown Street, to be followed by one almost twice that size next door. Seventy of the apartments in the new building have four or more bedrooms, and a synagogue accommodating 150 people will be located on the ground floor.

Back in the car, Mr. Goldstein made a left turn, saw a young boy on the sidewalk, and honked. “One of my grandchildren,” Mr. Goldstein said proudly. “I have 17.”
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Old February 6th, 2008, 12:31 AM   #1289
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great new box, love it
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Old February 6th, 2008, 12:54 AM   #1290
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Quote:
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/12272007...nza_120670.htm
BROADWAY BONANZA

NEWSWEEK BUILDING GETS A MAJOR FACELIFT, NEW TENANTS


1775 Broadway now...


... and 1775 Broadway after its 2008 redesign.

.
This is the kind of crap they did in the 70's covering classic facades with bland glass.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 02:10 AM   #1291
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WTF? Are you kidding me? What piece of shit. WTF IS THAT? It's things like these that get to me...
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Old February 6th, 2008, 02:52 AM   #1292
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"a graciously proportioned base boasting a 57 foot-high, wraparound glass retail façade".

Who are the trying to kid? It's just a crude lump, no more gracious than an average shoe box. These bland glass facades are a plague. Architecture is moving into a second dark age, a sequel to the disastrous 20th century modernist era.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 05:57 PM   #1293
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whats wrong with the early 20th century facade underneath it is what I want to know? And if its "not stylish" then they are 6th graders.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 10:59 PM   #1294
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great new box, love it
ZZ-II, are there any projects you don't like, b/c you tend to sound like a yesman on all of them?
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Old February 6th, 2008, 11:27 PM   #1295
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, i'm not a "yesman". but tell me one reason why i shouldn't like most of the projects? when they've a good design for me then i can't change it.
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Old February 7th, 2008, 08:25 AM   #1296
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A Tonier Image Is Sought for Eighth Avenue in Midtown

By PATRICK McGEEHAN
Published: February 7, 2008
nytimes.com

Eighth Avenue is no longer Manhattan’s answer to the Tenderloin district of San Francisco. But now that almost all of its peep shows and pornographic video stores have been eradicated, the open question is, what will this once-seedy part of Midtown become in its next life?

Officials of the Times Square Alliance have begun a campaign to attract distinctive stores and restaurants that they hope will create an atmosphere on the stretch of Eighth between 40th and 53rd Streets that fits comfortably between tourist-thronged Times Square and the gentrifying Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood to the west.

New street-level retail spaces are expanding as new glass high-rises, like the Hearst Tower, The New York Times Building and 11 Times Square, which is under construction at 42nd Street, redefine Eighth Avenue. The new towers have inspired the alliance to coin an immodest nickname: the Avenue of Architecture.

But rather than wait for those new spaces to fill up with bank branches and national chain stores, the alliance, which represents property owners and businesses in the area, is hoping to attract locally owned and less-ubiquitous stores that might appeal to neighborhood residents as well as to office workers.

“If you live at 44th and Ninth, there’s not a clothing store anywhere around, not a bookstore,” said Tim Tompkins, the president of the alliance.

The area already has plenty of foot traffic; several blocks of Eighth Avenue above 42nd Street draw more than 30,000 pedestrians a day each, according to a report compiled by the alliance. But office workers in the neighborhood tend to leave at lunchtime and after work. A recent study conducted by the alliance found that more than $250 million of potential spending was being lost annually to other parts of the city.

The first trick will be to entice the throngs passing through the area to slow down and take a look around, said Scott M. Stringer, the Manhattan borough president. Mr. Stringer’s office has pledged $108,000 toward the installation of sidewalk lights and signs to help people navigate the neighborhood, he said.

“The key here is to get people out walking and going into a neighborhood where they didn’t think they could walk, to start to create a different kind of robust economy,” Mr. Stringer said.

Mr. Tompkins is planning to draw more attention to the area after dark by holding a lighting festival in which lighting designers would be invited to illuminate the facades of buildings like the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

The alliance also hopes to persuade the city’s Department of Transportation to make the area friendlier to pedestrians by installing new newsstands and bicycle racks — and by removing the metal fence (installed during the Giuliani administration to protect pedestrians) that runs along the western curb of the avenue between 42nd and 43rd streets, Mr. Tompkins said.

“We hate that fence. It just looks terrible,” he said, adding that many pedestrians choose to walk in the street rather than between it and the adjacent shops.

Changing the perception of Eighth Avenue, which “had a lot of porn and a lot of 99-cents shops,” will take some time, said Faith H. Consolo, chairman of the retail leasing and sales division of Prudential Douglas Elliman Real Estate.

“I think it could be a great street to have your office on, to live and go shopping on,” Ms. Consolo said. “But that’s a year to 18 months away. It’s not happening overnight.” Ideal shops, she said, could include higher-end women’s clothing stores like Searle and stationers and gift boutiques like Montblanc.

Still, storefront rents could run as high as $200 to $250 a square foot, she said, prices that are daunting to many small merchants and restaurateurs.

But, illustrating how difficult it could be to redefine the area, Mr. Tompkins cited a very different group of potential tenants. He said he would prefer to see the avenue attract “homegrown New York merchants” like Two Boots pizzeria and Brooklyn Industries, a casual clothing merchant.

Lexy Funk, the president of Brooklyn Industries, a nine-store company that started in Williamsburg, said she has considered opening a store in Hell’s Kitchen and might be interested in space along Eighth Avenue.

“We’ve always taken risks in our real estate,” Ms. Funk said. “The issue right now with Manhattan real estate is it’s become too expensive for small merchants. We’re competing against banks and international chains.”
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Old February 7th, 2008, 08:41 AM   #1297
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Yeah facelift...and in a perfect world it would be renamed the Joan Rivers building.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 04:18 AM   #1298
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, i'm not a "yesman". but tell me one reason why i shouldn't like most of the projects? when they've a good design for me then i can't change it.
I am not saying that you can't like the projects, I am asking if you actually look into what the projects represent or how they were brought up, which is what gives the criticism.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 04:36 AM   #1299
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Yeah facelift...and in a perfect world it would be renamed the Joan Rivers building.
except theres nothing pretty underneath.
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Old February 8th, 2008, 11:42 AM   #1300
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I am not saying that you can't like the projects, I am asking if you actually look into what the projects represent or how they were brought up, which is what gives the criticism.
i don't live in NY, so such things are not really relevant for me. the design is what counts to me .
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