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Old February 9th, 2009, 05:13 AM   #1501
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Transit agency, developer delay closing on $1 billion deal to develop Manhattan railyards
4 February 2009

NEW YORK (AP) - Tough economic times have put off the closing of a $1 billion deal to build office towers and apartments over a huge stretch of railyards, transit officials said Tuesday.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which runs the city's mass transit system, and the Related Cos. developer agreed to extend the Jan. 31 closing date of their contract for the Hudson Yards project by up to a year after the developer expressed concerns about coming up with a $50 million payment to start a 99-year lease for the property.

Related, partnered with Goldman Sachs, was the second developer chosen by the MTA to build more than 10 million square feet of apartments, office towers, shops and a public school over 26 acres of railyards on the West Side of Manhattan.

Tishman Speyer Properties dropped out of the deal last year over the price to lease the land. Related will pay at least $2 billion more than a lease price to build platforms over the railyards along the Hudson River.

The MTA, facing its own $1 billion-plus deficits and contemplating bus and subway service cuts and fare hikes, said it didn't intend to look for a third developer in an economy in which financing has been scarce.

"Today's agreement acknowledges current economic realities without derailing our partnership on this important site for New York's future," MTA Executive Director Elliot G. Sander said.

Related has paid millions of dollars in design fees, has obtained agency approvals and is moving through a process to rezone half the railyards for its project.

"When the markets rebound and with zoning in place, New York City will be poised to build a vibrant new mixed-use community at the rail yards," Related Cos. Chairman Stephen M. Ross said.

The delay on the closing doesn't affect construction schedules yet. Related had never set a date when it would complete the towers, parks, shops and hotels, and construction on the platforms over the tracks isn't expected to begin until next year.
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Old February 11th, 2009, 03:18 AM   #1502
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Some pics of BOA not finish but nice anyway I didn't take them and I don't know





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Old February 23rd, 2009, 03:31 AM   #1503
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Its only a matter of time before some new company arises and builds some massive 3000 foot tall tower. I want to be here that day.


Last edited by Mr. Lion; February 23rd, 2009 at 03:35 AM. Reason: forgot something
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Old February 23rd, 2009, 11:18 AM   #1504
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Lion View Post
Its only a matter of time before some new company arises and builds some massive 3000 foot tall tower. I want to be here that day.

in NYC there is 0% chance it's get approved.
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Old February 23rd, 2009, 06:08 PM   #1505
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That is the sad thing.
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Old February 24th, 2009, 07:21 PM   #1506
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Let's start with 2000+ feet tower first then more taller buildings come along. That will help balance Manhattan skyline better than having one tower pop out of the skyline.
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Old February 25th, 2009, 05:23 AM   #1507
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Damm!!
Great!!!
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Old February 26th, 2009, 05:02 PM   #1508
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Quote:
Originally Posted by webeagle12 View Post
in NYC there is 0% chance it's get approved.
lol, are there height restrictions in Manhattan?
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Old February 26th, 2009, 05:28 PM   #1509
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of course
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Old March 16th, 2009, 06:06 PM   #1510
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Van Valkenburgh Takes the Boulevard
Hudson Yards landscape architect to design linked public corridor


LOOKING NORTH TOWARD 42ND STREET, MVVA'S DESIGN, WITH TOSHIKO MORI ARCHITECT, ENVISIONS FLUVIAL FORMS CULMINATING IN A CABLE-STAYED BRIDGE.

12.10.2008
Jeff Byles
archpaper.com

Many New Yorkers are wondering how the Related Companies will muster the wherewithal for its multi-billion Hudson Yards mega-development, but plans are moving ahead for Hudson Park and Boulevard, the newly mapped thoroughfare angling north from the West Side railyards to 42nd Street.

Bringing this linear swath of neighborhood one step closer to reality, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA) has been selected as lead designer for the project, which will run west of 10th Avenue and include a 4-acre system of parks linking to the core of Hudson Yards.

Related’s executives let news of the decision slip during a presentation of updated railyard designs at a Community Board 4 meeting on December 1, although the Hudson Yards Development Corporation (HYDC) remains officially mum on the matter. “We’re still negotiating to select the design team, so we really can’t comment,” said Wendy Leventer, the HYDC’s senior vice president of planning and design.

The choice of Van Valkenburgh was perhaps no surprise, as the landscape architect is already on Related’s design team for Hudson Yards. The other finalists for the project were Gustafson Guthrie Nichol with Allied Works Architecture, West 8 with Mathews Nielsen, Work AC with Balmori Associates, and Hargreaves Associates with TEN Arquitectos.

Van Valkenburgh’s office, which will design the boulevard with Toshiko Mori Architect, adds the project to a busy New York portfolio, which includes Brooklyn Bridge Park, a stretch of Hudson River Park, and the revamp of the north end of Union Square Park. The office deemed the dynamic public spaces of this last project a prototype for their Hudson Boulevard scheme.

“Our idea was to take the elements of Union Square and redeploy them so they would work on a long, linear site,” Matthew Urbanski, principal at MVVA, told AN. “It’s got a civic quality and a grand quality, and the plazas end up being these fantastic places that can support farmers’ markets and impromptu gatherings."

In some ways, the boulevard is a remnant of the city’s quashed 2012 Olympics bid, once destined as a grand urban gesture leading to a stadium atop the railyards. Now, the city envisions residential and commercial towers stretching south from 42nd Street, where the project’s flashiest element would be placed: a cable-stayed pedestrian bridge, designed with Mori’s office and engineers Schlaich Bergermann, spanning the Lincoln Tunnel approach. The public space would then expand into what Urbanski called “fluvially informed shapes,” with grassy areas surrounded by more densely planted, tree-lined sections along the boulevard. Plans also call for an entrance to the No. 7 subway extension between 33rd and 34th streets, with a domed glass canopy designed by Mori. The park would terminate within the Hudson Yards site, focusing on a yet-to-be-determined cultural center.


THE PARK ALONG THE CENTER OF THE BOULEVARD WOULD BE MODELED AFTER UNION SQUARE'S MULTIDIRECTIONAL URBAN PLAZAS.

Local residents have questioned how the boulevard would link to the large public space planned for the heart of the 26-acre railyard site, which Related is developing with Goldman Sachs. Asked about the plans at the community board meeting, Vishaan Chakrabarti, Related’s executive vice president of design and planning, described the boulevard as flowing seamlessly into the complex, although details within Hudson Yards remain to be refined.

“We’re still working on exactly how that’s done,” Urbanski told AN. “It flows south to the cultural center, then there’s a movement west to the river. It’s an interesting design challenge to figure out how to create a series of spaces that aren’t all one gesture—that would be kind of boring—but flow naturally from one to another.”

Given the economic meltdown, the full build-out may take a while. But plans are optimistically afoot to begin razing the dozens of structures in the new boulevard’s path, including the 65,000-square-foot former FedEx building on 34th Street, that the city has been busily acquiring. The HYDC aims to complete the project’s first phase, between 33rd and 36th streets, by 2013.
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Old March 16th, 2009, 06:09 PM   #1511
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Fore!
Nation's largest green roof atop Bronx water plant doubles as driving range



02.26.2009
Matt Chaban
archpaper.com

Mosholu Golf Course in the Bronx is one of a dozen run by the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation. Its compact layout is typical of New York’s urban courses—nine holes, tree-lined fairways, the odd sand bunker—save for one highly unusual obstacle: the $2.1 billion drinking water treatment facility under construction on what used to be the driving range.

When this heavily secured compound is completed in 2012, it’s due to be topped by far more than just new turf. Grimshaw and landscape architect Ken Smith have designed one of the largest and most intensive green roofs to date, which is also a fully functioning driving range. And an irrigation system for the golf course. And an integrated security program for the facility below. Think Pebble Beach meets the Biosphere meets Rikers.

“The distinction here is it’s not just a green roof, but a performative green roof that needs to provide all these functions,” Smith said in an interview. “I think we’re pushing both the design of the green roof and the design of the golf course in new directions. We’re working to see how far we can push the diversity of the ecology and still adhere to the constraints of the golf course.”

This quietly radical project is the result of more than a decade of debate over whether or not water from the Croton Reservoir, the smallest of the city’s three, needed treatment after more than a century of going without. That was followed by battles with Bronx residents over which and even whether the borough’s parks would be torn up to make way for the new plant. The city finally broke ground on the facility in 2004, and the driving range has moved to a temporary site while the complex roofscape takes shape.


THE CLUBHOUSE AND RANGE WILL SEAMLESSLY EXTEND VAN CORTLANDT PARK.

The engineering challenges are formidable. At nine acres, the $95 million driving range is the largest contiguous green roof in the country. So when it rains at the range, it pours, which creates a paradoxical hazard for the plant below. “It’s of paramount importance to the City of New York that this building stay dry, despite being full of water,” said David Burke, the project architect at Grimshaw. So to handle the millions of gallons that can accumulate on the green roof during a storm, the design team has devised a natural filtration system to collect, process, and store the runoff.

The range’s unique topography not only provides green-like targets for golfers, who tee off from the perimeter of the circular structure, but helps channel rainwater into the collection basins, where it meets groundwater pumped in from the plant’s four sump pumps. The water then travels through a series of ten cells that ring the range, each one modeled on a different native ecosystem to serve different filtration purposes. It takes up to eight days for water to travel through the cells, at which point it’s collected and used to irrigate the golf course.

“We’re not just dumping it in the sewer,” said Mark Laska, president of Great Ecology & Environments, one of two ecological designers on the project. “It’s a true display of sustainable green design in an urban environment.”

The design team wanted to convey such sustainable lessons to the public, especially the kids enrolled in the First Tee outreach program at Mosholu, and so the cells were left in plain view. Furthermore, because they are sunk ten feet below grade, they serve as a moat of sorts that helps protect the city’s water supply, which is seen as a potential target for terrorists.

To that end, Grimshaw has also designed the guardhouse and screening buildings that security constraints required, in addition to the new clubhouse and tee boxes on the range. (Grimshaw is not designing the plant, however, which is the work of a specialized engineering firm.)

It's an unlikely commission, to be sure, but one the architects embraced. “It’s very fitting for Grimshaw,” as Burke put it. “We tend to gravitate toward these oddball projects.”


THE CLUBHOUSE, SPORTING A GREEN ROOF OF ITS OWN, IS SITED ALONG THE PERIMETER OF THE RANGE.
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Old March 16th, 2009, 06:14 PM   #1512
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Fourth Transportation Mega Project in New York City Soon to Enter Construction Phase



12 March 2009
from The Transport Politic blog by Yonah Freemark
thetransportpolitic.com

New Jersey Transit and the Port Authority soon to begin construction on Access to the Region’s Core

Days like this make you step back and realize just how far we’ve come. On Friday, New Jersey Transit and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey will begin advertising bids for the first construction contracts for the Access to Region’s Core project. This rail tunnel will be the fourth major transit expansion project currently under construction in New York City, after the Long Island Railroad’s East Side Access project, the Second Avenue Subway’s first phase, and the extension of the 7 subway line.

The $8.7 billion project, to open for service in 2017, will provide new tracks for commuter trains under the Hudson River between New Jersey and New York City and create a huge new 6-track station under 34th Street in Midtown Manhattan (pictured above). The first construction will occur in North Bergen, though tunneling will follow soon after in Manhattan. New Jersey assigned $130 million of its transit stimulus funds towards the project. Both NJ Transit and the Port Authority have been generous in their distribution of funds to the project so far, though it still needs financial assurance from the federal government - likely to come this year - to complete the program.

I have a number of concerns about the project, many of which I addressed a few months ago here. As currently designed, the project will make it difficult to expand the tunnels to the East Side of Manhattan; the new station will be far too deep in the ground, making commutes inconvenient; and Amtrak will not be able to use the tracks for through service because there won’t be a connection to the existing Penn Station.

But those qualms aside, the fact remains that we haven’t seen investment in transit like this - together, the projects total more than $20 billion - since the 1930s. We’re virtually doubling commuter rail capacity into Manhattan, we’re taking dramatic steps to relieve the overcrowded Lexington Avenue lines, and we’re opening up a whole new area for central business district development. New York is being provided the vital arteries that will ensure its continued health in the 21st century.

In the early 1990s, it would have been difficult to imagine such a large investment in Gotham’s transport infrastructure, especially after the repeated failures in getting these projects started back in the 1970s.

It is ironic, then, that these investments are being implemented now, just after the conclusion of the truly transit-hostile Bush Administration. We can thank the renewed interest in urban life than began fifteen years ago, New York’s dramatic comeback, and the resilience of the metropolitan area’s politicians in the face of policy that would have otherwise kept these projects in the fantasy bin.

It also tells us that we need to work harder during the Obama Administration to make sure than a transit-friendly government maintains and increases the support Washington has provided for public transportation in recent years. This applies to New York, of course, but also to all of the nation’s metropolitan areas, each of which need and should expect money for better transit.

With these projects underway, it’s time to get started on the next batch. I’m thinking Second Avenue Subway phases II, III, and IV, Metro-North West Side Access, Moynihan Station, Triborough RX, and maybe even an Atlantic Avenue subway.

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Old March 16th, 2009, 06:33 PM   #1513
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Too Big to Fail
LPC approves St. Vincent's plans for hospital tower


THIRD TIME'S A CHARM: PEI COBB FREED & PARTNERS' DESIGN FOR A NEW HOSPITAL TOWER FOR ST. VINCENT'S, SEEN LOOKING SOUTH DOWN 7TH AVENUE.

03.10.2009
Matt Chaban
archpaper.com

The fate of Albert C. Ledner’s National Maritime Union headquarters was all but sealed this morning when the Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the latest iteration of the tower proposed by St. Vincent’s Hospital for the site of the much-debated Greenwich Village landmark. At the same time, a coalition of preservation groups and neighbors opened another front in their long-running battle against the hospital and its plans, filing a lawsuit to stop the demolition of the 1966 structure known as the O’Toole Building.

In the 8-3 vote, the commission awarded a certificate of appropriateness for Pei Cobb Freed & Partners’ design for the tower, which has been reduced further to 278 feet, one of nearly a dozen new concessions made by the architect and endorsed by a majority of the commissioners.

“I really cannot recall anything this body has dealt with with such concern and compassion for such a challenging and complex application,” Robert Tierney, the commission chair, said. “But we live in a real world and we cannot ignore the important social concerns that are raised with this application. That said, I believe this building will contribute to the character of the neighborhood and that we, through this process, have pushed it to a place where I can find it appropriate.”


THE O'TOOLE BUILDING, ON WHOSE SITE THE HOSPITAL TOWER WILL RISE.

St. Vincent’s has been one of the longest applications in recent memory, beginning in the fall of 2007. The hospital has partnered with developer Bill Rudin, who will pay $310 million toward the construction of the $850 million hospital tower in exchange for the right to build a condominium complex, designed by FXFowle, on the existing hospital campus across the street. In May 2008, the commission voted down the project on grounds that it was inappropriate in scale and character for the lowrise Greenwich Village Historic District, and that the applicant failed to justify the demolition of Ledner’s landmark, which is now owned by St. Vincent’s.

The team returned in June 2008 with a new proposal that included a hardship application, which the commission reluctantly supported in October. While today’s vote was not the last—the commission still has to determine the appropriateness of the condominiums—the biggest hurdle is over. Or, as Tierney put it before the vote, “This is a threshold point.”

Throughout the public review process, a quiet, though occasionally boisterous, battle between health care and preservation has been playing out. “There are good arguments on all sides of this, but the foremost is still the mission to heal, mend, and care for the community,” commissioner Christopher Moore said in casting his supporting vote for the project. “I can say, if O’Toole is going down for a good cause, this is a great cause.”


A VIEW OF THE 7TH AVENUE FACADE.

Every commissioner who voted for the project found that the concessions made over the course of the public review had greatly improved the proposed building, which had once stood as high as 329 feet, before being reduced in June to 299 feet, and now rises 278 feet, though the final version technically reaches 286 feet at the setback.

To reduce the height, cooling towers that had been located in the basement have been moved to the roof of the adjacent Handling Center, a small building across 12th Street that serves as the loading dock for the hospital. This allowed for the transfer of one floor from the tower to the basement, while improving the appearance of the Handling Center. “What had once resembled a single-story suburban drive-in is now a much more appropriate building,” commissioner Fred Bland said. Additionally, a few inches were shaved off each floor, with diagnostic floor heights reduced from 16 feet to 15 feet 4 inches, and patient floors from 13 feet 4 inches to 13 feet.


A DETAIL OF THE NEW TERRA COTTA LOUVRES.

Another change was the addition of terra cotta louvers to the ribbon windows that many commissioners decried in December as too institutional. While the ribbon windows still exist, some panes have been screened over with louvers in a pattern the commission found appropriate for the Village. Similarly, the entry and street wall have been enlivened with windows that more closely resemble the Village’s ubiquitous row houses, while an art installation has been proposed for one wall of the Handling Center.

Even the commissioners who voted against the project conceded that much thought had gone into the tower’s latest iteration. “I think what’s been proposed at the ground floor is generally an improvement and is appropriate,” commissioner Stephen Byrns said, “but my threshold is still the height, and it’s still too tall.” Commissioner Roberta Brandes Gratz, another dissenter, actually saw Pei Cobb Freed’s due diligence as a strike against the project. “I must say the innovations up to now are considerable, though that same approach could be applied to renovating the existing building or working on an alternative site,” she said.


LOOKING EAST DOWN 12TH STREET AT THE INTERSECTION OF GREENWICH AVENUE. THE HANDLING CENTER CAN BE SEEN TO THE RIGHT.

For its part, the development team agreed that the process had been worth it. “We believe the design has actually become stronger through this process,” Ian Bader, the partner-in-charge, said. “Even though the situation at times has been daunting, the result has been far better for it.” Rudin said he saw the vote as a confirmation of the team's hard work, adding that he expects to go before the commission with the condominium project within “the next couple of months, as soon as their ready.”

Preservationists were disappointed by the vote, if unsurprised. “This is basically what we expected,” said Melissa Baldock, a preservation fellow at the Municipal Art Society. “The vote fell along the lines of the hardship, so we really see it as more a confirmation of that than a vote for this building.”
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Old March 16th, 2009, 08:36 PM   #1514
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Thanks for the updates Don Omar, all of those projects are excellent.
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Old March 19th, 2009, 05:08 PM   #1515
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Strand hotel

HI,

sorry if this has been asked before, but the search button does not give any results and I can't really start browsing 51 pages. Well, I could, but it is a lot.

In the first post of the OP, the 35th building is the Strand Hotel in NY.
Does anyone know how this building is coming along?

thanks very much in advance!
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Old March 21st, 2009, 01:26 PM   #1516
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Clinton Park.

Mixed-use block provides horse, car and human housing in central Manhattan
Located at the western edge of Midtown Manhattan, the Clinton Park mixed-use development, currently in the first stages of construction, will occupy more than half of a city block with 1.3 million sq ft of commercial and residential programs.



Designed by Enrique Norten and Ten Arquitectos, the building fills a void in the urban fabric by integrating multiple commercial uses at the base and providing 900 housing units in the 27 floors above. The base building will include a 50,000 sq-ft auto showroom fronting 11th Avenue with 250,000 sq ft of service floors below grade, a 30,000 sq-ft horse stable for the NYPD Mounted Police, a 7,500 square-foot neighborhood market, a 30,000 square-foot health club, and 200 parking spaces.



The overall massing of the project slopes up and away from Clinton Park, starting at 96 feet along 11th Avenue and climbing up to 348 feet at the middle of the residential block; this height transition negotiates two very dissimilar urban scales: the flat, horizontal one of the park located to the west of 11th Avenue and the vertical, windowless structure of the telephone switching tower to the east of the site.

Securing light and air for a great majority of apartment units, the double loaded corridor shifts diagonally across the site in a unique orientation to the Manhattan grid, reducing the building’s mass adjacent to the neighboring buildings.



Each floor steps up from the one below, allowing for unobstructed views to the park and Hudson River and providing private roof terraces with green roofs on every floor. A varied treatment of street walls and interior facades creates a solid exterior with smaller openings along the street edges of the building, while lighter facades skin the building where the form pulls away from the street. This language of interior and exterior makes reference to the historic court spaces of New York City housing.

The building’s mirrored structure introduces the creation of two garden terraces, a unique green feature among the city’s urban grid. The gardens and the green roofs on each floor introduce a refreshing sense of proximity to nature into the otherwise massive structure.

source: worldarchitecturenews



THIS IS BEAUTIFULL !!!



This is buildingdesign of the future "green cities"

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Old March 21st, 2009, 02:33 PM   #1517
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I like this project very much.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 01:03 AM   #1518
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That is very interesting project. That building reminds me of one building in Sao Paulo in Brazil. I forgot the name of building.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 01:28 AM   #1519
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Yeah I love this Clinton Park project. I don't know why it drew in so many skeptics when it was first introduced. It will look terriffic from the street at night.
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Old March 22nd, 2009, 01:58 AM   #1520
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That city deserve the number one place in the world. The world is looking to the U.S if it goes of new trends (point)
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