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Old February 23rd, 2010, 10:36 PM   #1561
Don Omar
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Nouvel’s Vision Machine: Tower on Hudson River nears completion


Nouvel Chelsea, New York, United States

22 Feb 2010
worldarchitecturenews.com

Designed as a direct descendent of French architect Jean Nouvel’s Parisian landmark Arab World Institute building, his new 23-storey residential tower overlooking the Hudson River is nearing completion. Previously known as 100 11th, the tower has now been named Nouvel Chelsea in admiration of the architect’s prestige but the architect himself has called it his ‘vision machine’.

Nouvel’s own input in the luxury condominium block has been felt to the very last detail, from bathroom fixtures to the clever light enhancing technique of adding an extra layer of nearly imperceptible transparent gloss under the windows to boost incoming sunlight. Almost 1700 individually sized colourless glass panes are set at unique angles and torques to create a glimmering pixilated façade and frame some of the most spectacular views in the city, making each of the 72 residences distinctive from the next. Some windows reach as much as16 ft tall or 37 ft across.

Split into one, two and three bedroom apartments and five penthouses, prices for the exclusive development ranged from $1.6 million to $22 million when construction commenced on site in March 2007, timed in conjunction with the Arab World Institute building’s 20th anniversary. Originally expected to be fit for occupancy by the end of 2008, however, the building is still undergoing its final preparations.

The lobby, which contains customized millwork desks designed by Nouvel, also provides access to the apartments’ gardens and private gym, spa and 70 ft mirror canopied pool, one of the largest in Manhattan.

At ground level Nouvel has devised a mullioned glass screen rising seven stories high encasing a maturely planted atrium named The Loggia which can be enjoyed exclusively by the residents on these seven floors via apartment terraces, some open, some closed to the atrium.

While designed as an exclusive development, its uncompromisingly unique exterior joins that of Frank Gehry’s recent headquarters for the InterActive Corporation, making 19th Street and Westside junction a hive of architectural promise for passers-by to ponder.

The tower was designed by Atelier Jean Nouvel with Beyer Blinder Belle.







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Old February 24th, 2010, 03:18 AM   #1562
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Future Downtown Brooklyn Citypoint Mall Seeking LEED Silver



02/23/10
by Brit Liggett
inhabitat.com

[...] The city of New York has just delegated 20 million dollars in stimulus funds to jump-start the building of the LEED Certified Citypoint Mall. The mall is the first phase of a larger construction project to take place on the site of the old Albee Mall — demolished in 2007 — and is part of the city’s efforts to make-over downtown Brooklyn. [...]

The project also includes a future office building, an apartment complex, and a small green space at Willoughby Street. We’re confident the building will feature some significant sustainable features as the developers, Cook + Fox have projects such as the Bank of America Tower under their belts. [...]



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Old February 24th, 2010, 03:58 AM   #1563
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I love Nouvel Chelsea Tower!!! Very different and unusual looking building!
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Old May 7th, 2010, 08:33 PM   #1564
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Looking good! (I was just loathe to see NEW YORK on page 3).
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Old May 8th, 2010, 03:02 PM   #1565
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i think this one is a vision... it's called ISAR EST, located in lower manhattan. here are a few pics:

[email protected]

image hosted on flickr


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Old May 8th, 2010, 04:11 PM   #1566
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never seen this project before...but it looks absolutely great . seems to be 300-400m tall
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Old May 8th, 2010, 05:02 PM   #1567
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZZ-II View Post
never seen this project before...but it looks absolutely great . seems to be 300-400m tall
me neither! i just discovered it myself a few hours ago... accidentally lol. if this project becomes reality, lower manhattan will look even better!

EDIT: looking at those renders, i think the tower is about 1200ft+ high.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


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Old May 8th, 2010, 05:17 PM   #1568
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It looks to vulnerable to car bombs that's just my opinion
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Old May 9th, 2010, 01:00 AM   #1569
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That's a nice project indeed,shame it has very few chances that become reality.
The top could be better.I don't see why doing a flat roof for such a dynamic structure.
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Old May 9th, 2010, 02:24 PM   #1570
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I would love to see this NYC, this is the kind of thing New York needs after Tour de verre being shortened and 2WTC possibly not getting built. Plus @ Draegen why change our way of life for the terrorists, f*** them.
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Old May 10th, 2010, 09:23 PM   #1571
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from boston.com

Mosque going up in NYC building damaged on 9/11


This aerial photo of April 20, 2010, shows the New York city block, lower right, where a 13-story mosque is planned for construction two blocks north of the World Trade Center site, center left. The plan for the $100 million mosque and cultural center received initial support on Wednesday, May 5, 2010 from community board 1 in Lower Manhattan. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)


Quote:
NEW YORK—In a building damaged by debris from the Sept. 11 airliners that brought down the World Trade Center and soon to become a 13-story mosque, some see the bridging of a cultural divide and an opportunity to serve a burgeoning, peaceful religious population. Others see a painful reminder of the religious extremism that killed their loved ones.

Two Muslim organizations have partnered to open the mosque and cultural center in lower Manhattan, saying the $100 million project will create a venue for mainstream Islam and a counterbalance to radicalism. It earned a key endorsement this week from influential community leaders.

But some 9/11 victims' families said they were angered that it would be built so close to where their relatives died.

"I don't like it," said Evelyn Pettigano, who lost a sister in the attacks, during a phone interview on Thursday. "I'm not prejudiced. ... It's too close to the area where our family members were murdered."

But the growing number of congregants at the only other nearby mosque, open only one day a week, created a need for an additional space for Muslim prayer in the neighborhood, said Daisy Khan, the executive director of the American Society for Muslim Advancement and a board member of the Cordoba Initiative, the two organizations sponsoring the project.

The history associated with the building, a former Burlington Coat Factory store that closed after being damaged on 9/11, was a reason to pick it for the project, she said.

"We want to create a platform by which the voices of the mainstream and silent majority of Muslims will be amplified. A center of this scale and magnitude will do that," Khan said. "We feel it's an obligation as Muslims and Americans to be part of the rebuilding of downtown Manhattan."

The organizations publicly unveiled the preliminary plan for the project, known as the Cordoba House, on Wednesday at a meeting of the finance committee of the local community board, which is composed of influential stakeholders in lower Manhattan. While the agency has no authority over what can be developed at the site, their support is viewed as key to gaining acceptance from residents.

Edward "Ro" Sheffe, the chairman of the financial district committee for Community Board 1, said the 15 members passed a resolution of support for the project, though he emphasized that the board had no authority to approve or disapprove of a house of worship, per se. Indeed, he said the developers could do whatever they wanted with the building, which they own.

"They came to tell us what they had in mind and see what we felt about it," he said. "The understanding we came away with was that this was an ongoing dialogue."

The members' only concerns had to do with the aesthetics of the building, and whether it would fit with the surrounding architecture, he said. The overall feeling was one of goodwill because the financial district, a fast-growing residential area, lacks for amenities such as community centers.

"We very much need residential amenities for the people who live here," he said.

But the simple idea of a mosque so near ground zero angered those whose family members were killed by adherents to radical Islam.

"I think it's despicable, and I think it's atrocious that anyone would even consider allowing them to build a mosque near the World Trade Center," said Rosemary Cain, whose son, George Cain, a firefighter, died on Sept. 11.

Anita LaFond Korsonsky, a Livingston, N.J., woman who lost her sister, also said she had misgivings.

"I presume that these people aren't going to be gathering there to plan another attack," she said.

The Muslim organizations plan to announce the groundbreaking later this year, possibly to coincide with the 10th anniversary of the attacks, Khan said. It could take up to three years to build the Cordoba House; the groups currently have no funds for the project but plan to start raising money, she said.

A Friday prayer service has been held since September at the building, she said.

Marvin Bethea, a paramedic who survived the toxic collapse of the twin towers and suffers from a range of afflictions, including post-traumatic stress disorder and asthma, said he supports the mosque.

"Not all Muslims are terrorists," Bethea said. "Muslims died on 9/11, as well. This is a tremendous gesture to show that we're not all full of hatred and bigotry."

------

Associated Press writer Karen Matthews contributed to this report.

Eds: RECASTS lead to CORRECT that planned mosque is 13 stories sted current building.

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Old May 10th, 2010, 09:37 PM   #1572
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about the tower posted above ... apparently i'm not the only one who discovered it lol, there' a separate thread for it on SSP:

link

NEW YORK | Greenwich South study (SkyVoid) | 1,300 FT / 396 M
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Old May 11th, 2010, 07:50 PM   #1573
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A 13-story building occupying the space where it could be built a skyscraper? Really sad! But this project is real?

It is true that WTC 2 was canceled?

And about the project "ISAR EST" is a real project? Or is creating a fake?

Last edited by rencharles; May 11th, 2010 at 08:03 PM.
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Old May 11th, 2010, 08:22 PM   #1574
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rencharles View Post
A 13-story building occupying the space where it could be built a skyscraper? Really sad! But this project is real?

It is true that WTC 2 was canceled?

And about the project "ISAR EST" is a real project? Or is creating a fake?
1. the mosque is reality and will be built.
2. 2WTC is not cancelled - on the contrary, construction will begin soon, see 2WTC thread.
3. Greenwich South study (SkyVoid) (= ISAR EST) is not a fake, it's more like a vision. the concept is finished and almost everything developed but this supertall won't be built for now because it doesn't have any financing.
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Old May 12th, 2010, 04:37 AM   #1575
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Thanks for the reply (and fast). I do not live in the U.S. and I'm out of things! :S
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Old May 26th, 2010, 08:54 PM   #1576
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The Greening Of Lincoln Center
21 May 2010
The New York Times


Lincoln Center’s new lawn, atop a two-story structure along West 65th Street, curves up on two ends and is adjacent to a extended reflecting pool and a grove of trees.

Reconstructive surgery or just a little nip and tuck? That's the question that troubled the people who run Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts for years. As other cultural organizations around the country embarked on extravagant building projects in the late '90s and the early '00s, the center's various institutions bickered about how to compete, given their aging campus. Eventually they settled on a modest course of treatment, hoping that a few careful incisions here and a stitch or two there would be as effective, and produce a result as beautiful, as new construction.

It seemed a sensible, even shrewd, strategy, especially after the completion last year of the project's first phase -- in which the architects, Diller Scofidio & Renfro, carved up the interior of the old 1960s-era Alice Tully Hall and sliced off parts of its facade to produce a striking hybrid of Modern and contemporary.

But the latest and most important phase, a renovation of the central and north plazas that will be unveiled on Friday, doesn't measure up to that promising start. While the new spaces do a lot to connect the famously aloof complex to its surroundings, their architecture is too subdued in some places, pointlessly gimmicky at others. Worse, the spaces don't flow together in a way that might have given the center the internal coherence that it sorely needs.

Lincoln Center has never been easy to love, of course. Conceived as part of a vast slum-clearance program in the mid-1950s, it was denounced early on for its tabula rasa planning strategy and its fortresslike isolation from both Amsterdam Avenue, along its western edge, and 65th Street, which separates the main campus from Alice Tully Hall to the north. Its buildings were pastiches of Classical and Modern motifs, and the lack of architectural unity from one to the next was only underscored by their uniform cladding in Italian travertine.

Still, many of us have developed a fondness for the center as a cold war period piece. And to a younger generation of architects -- who are able to see the postwar megablock with fresh eyes -- projects like Lincoln Center and the old World Trade Center functioned, despite their obvious flaws, as welcome counterpoints to the smaller-grained city. Even their detachment had an upside, providing a quiet escape from the frenetic energy all around.

Part of what was appealing about the Diller Scofidio & Renfro proposal was the way it embodied those kinds of mixed feelings, and evinced a desire to create something of our own age without butchering history. The main approach to the central plaza from Columbus Avenue, for example, has been entirely re-engineered without significantly changing its character. A road for drop-offs that once separated the two has been relocated below ground, and the architects have extended the plaza all the way to the sidewalk, so pedestrians can now climb the stairs up to it without first running a gantlet of taxi traffic.

Similarly, the gloomy 204-foot-wide bridge that once crossed 65th Street, connecting the north plaza to the Juilliard School and Alice Tully Hall, has been ripped out, forcing people down to the street via a generous staircase. A new two-story structure, which will eventually house new facilities for the Film Society and a high-end restaurant, rises from ground level just to the west of the stair; its roof, covered by a vast, tilting lawn, overlooks the plaza. The project's most dazzling space, the lawn warps up on two sides, so that climbing it can make you feel as if you were about to float off into the air on a carpet of green.

The overall architectural strategy brings to mind some of the ideas that inspired Baron Haussmann's 19th-century vision of Paris: tear new channels through the urban fabric, unclog blocked arteries, create new sites for public spectacle. But Diller Scofidio & Renfro's approach is less violent. If all art represents, in part, psychological struggle with the work of our parents' generation, then the Lincoln Center project is more a gentle, probing examination than an effort at outright obliteration.

The problems begin with the tacked-on feeling of some of the design elements. The new car drop-off along Columbus Avenue, for example, which snakes down along the edge of a narrow landscaped garden before disappearing under the new plaza entry stair, elegantly interweaves the pedestrian city with elements of postwar car culture.

Yet Diller Scofidio & Renfro mess it up with cheap frills: the LED lights that scroll across the risers of the steps listing the night's performances are distracting and pointless; the two slender glass canopies that extend out over the edge of the staircase from the bulky travertine arcades of Avery Fisher Hall and the David H. Koch Theater look flimsy, as if a strong wind could blow them away. An impression begins to build that the architects and their clients, who will have eventually spent more than $1 billion on the project, wanted to make sure that the public could see where the money went.

More important, however, is a surprising insensitivity to the way bodies flow through space, something that is as fundamental to architecture and urban planning as to ballet and theater. A subway entrance at the corner of Columbus Avenue and 65th Street, designed by the architects, is set at a slight angle to the site, partly blocking the flow of movement up toward the plaza from the north. At the back of the plaza, the two low walls that frame the entry to the Metropolitan Opera House have been beefed up, which makes the passage into Damrosch Plaza, on the left, and the north plaza, on the right, feel pinched.

The problem is especially apparent in the north plaza. In Dan Kiley's original design for the space, for example, the shallow reflecting pool in front of the Vivian Beaumont Theater was flanked on two sides by rows of low square planters, which allowed people to filter through the site from various directions. Diller Scofidio & Renfro replace this grid with a more linear scheme that feels comparatively oppressive. A small, rectangular grove of trees, elevated on a concrete pedestal, runs along the southern edge of the pool, funneling people from the central plaza along a narrow passageway toward the theater. The reflecting pool is now 20 feet longer, further emphasizing that east-west flow.

Even the elevated lawn rising up from the north side of the plaza can seem oddly out of place from here, its warped form relating neither to the theater nor to Avery Fisher Hall to the east. It is only once you climb onto it, through a small entry point at one corner, that its beauty becomes apparent. Strolling around the site, I found myself thinking about the architects Alvaro Siza, whose subtle compositions of line and form draw you through space naturally and unobtrusively, and Zaha Hadid, whose work does much the same, albeit at a faster pace. Here the effect is more jarring and fragmented.

There were two ways to avoid this trap. If the heads of Lincoln Center's constituent institutions could have gotten on the same page, they could probably have produced a bolder, more coordinated plan -- one that included the buildings. Given that this wasn't a real option, they should have done something subtler and lower-key, resisting the temptation of visual splash for its own sake.

Instead the project, for all its strengths, is an unwitting symbol of an atomized culture. It is an apt metaphor, perhaps, for Lincoln Center's history of institutional discord -- or our era's inability to build political consensus -- but that in itself doesn't make for great architecture.
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Old May 27th, 2010, 05:02 AM   #1577
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To think they were going to hand Lincoln Center over to Frank Gehry among other proposals!
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Old May 27th, 2010, 07:25 AM   #1578
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Such cool developments going on in the world's most important city
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Old June 6th, 2010, 07:51 PM   #1579
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This topic is almost dead, any news?
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Old June 9th, 2010, 01:52 PM   #1580
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rencharles View Post
This topic is almost dead, any news?
sure there are, one just had to find them... . in a city like NY there are always new projects planned. also there are so many developments and small highrises U/C. it is impossible to cover them all. same with HK, i have given up following the highrise section of HK a long time ago because there are simply "too many" towers.
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