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Old December 17th, 2010, 02:32 AM   #1621
desertpunk
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DNAinfo

Quote:
New Seaport Owner Revives Development Talks
Updated 5 hrs ago
December 16, 2010
By Julie Shapiro DNAinfo Reporter/Producer



SOUTH STREET SEAPORT — Many downtown residents breathed a sign of relief when South Street Seaport owner General Growth Properties declared bankruptcy in 2009 and put its controversial development plans on hold. But those plans, or something similar, could now be making a comeback.

The new owner of the Seaport, a General Growth spinoff called Howard Hughes Corp., has begun speaking with city agencies and SHoP Architects about options for redoing the property, a SHoP member said.

Corie Sharples, principal at SHoP, said the firm has not done any "physical work" for Howard Hughes but has attended meetings with them. "They’re proceeding very, very cautiously," Sharples said. "They’re talking with the city before doing anything else." SHoP Architects designed General Growth’s original 2008 plan to raze the Pier 17 mall and build a hotel and retail complex anchored by a 500-foot tower.

General Growth Properties' 2008 plan for the South Street Seaport, including a new 500-foot tower. (SHoP Architects)Local residents were concerned about the height of the tower and worried that the upscale development would shut out the community. General Growth proposed several givebacks to assuage those concerns, including a community center and a school.

The plan had strong support from the city Economic Development Corp., which owns the Seaport property, but it hit a snag at the city Landmarks Preservation Commission.

In November 2008, Landmarks commissioners slammed the project, calling the design “inappropriate” for the South Street Seaport Historic District. Commissioners also raised concerns about General Growth’s plan to move the historic Tin Building from the base of the pier to its tip. The commissioners did not vote on the plan, but they suggested that General Growth revise it.

However, General Growth was struggling under $27 billion in debt and soon saw its stock price fall below 50 cents a share. In April 2009, before returning to the LPC with revised plans, General Growth declared bankruptcy and put all development on hold.

General Growth officially emerged from bankruptcy earlier this fall, after splitting into two companies. GGP retained more than 180 malls across the country, while the spinoff Howard Hughes Corp. — bolstered by investments from Pershing Square Capital, Brookfield Asset Management and others — took over the properties with development potential, including the Seaport.

Howard Hughes Corp. has not spoken publicly about plans for the Seaport, and the company’s staff has not responded to Community Board 1’s request that they attend a public meeting, the board’s staff said. A Howard Hughes spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


Read more: http://www.dnainfo.com/20101216/down...#ixzz18JUJ7xPY
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Old December 18th, 2010, 01:26 PM   #1622
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Here is the NYC highrise development map on SkyscraperPage - http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/map...&z=13&status=1 (IE users careful, loads slow - Chrome or Firefox recommended)

75 proposed and U/C buildings marked currently.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 06:14 AM   #1623
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3.13.2011
Brooklyn Barclays Center



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Old July 11th, 2011, 02:50 PM   #1624
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rencharles View Post
image hosted on flickr
This building resembles the A.I..
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Old July 18th, 2011, 02:10 AM   #1625
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Copy and pasted this list from SSP, thanks to SONY for writing it out. I added some. These are all at different stages of development, from just proposals to u/c. Sure I'm missing some.

160 west 62nd | 54 floors
29 Flatbush Avenue | 457 FT / 139 M | 42 FLOORS
425 Park Ave. | FT| Floors
100 Varick St | FT | 20 FLOORS | PREP
The Charles | 398 feet | 34 floors
309 Fifth Avenue | 449 feet | 34 floors
50 W 40th St. | Proposed
10 UN Plaza | 520 FT / 158 M | 40 FLOORS
Riverside Center | 526/535/487/456/393 FT | 44-31 FLOORS
140 W. 42nd St (Hotel) | FT | 30 FLOORS
610 W. 57th St. | FT | 48 FLOORS | SITE PREP
855 6th ave l 455 FT / 139 M l 30 Fl l Site Prep
740 Eighth Ave | FT | FLOORS
(Remy) 28th & 6th ave| FT | FLOORS
Duarte Square | 429 FT | FLOORS
W 57th St. (Pyramid) | 467 FT | FLOORS
Tryon Center (Broadway & 190th St) | FT | 42, 39, 33, 23 FLOORS
78 Trinity Place | FT | 60 FLOORS
Hunter's Point South | FT | FLOORS
20 W 53rd St | FT | FLOORS
220 Central Park So.| 577' / 176m | 41 FLOORS
20 Times Square - Port Authority Bus Terminal Tower | 855 FT | 42 FL
1715 Broadway| 751 FT / 229 M | 67 FLOORS | DEMO
Fordham University Development | 630/580 FT tallest | FLOORS
West 54th Street | FT | 34 FLOORS
225 W 57th St | FT | FLOORS
Gotham West | ? ft | 14-31 floors
8 Stone St. | 404 FT / 123 M | 43 FLOORS
99 Washington Street (Holiday Inn) | 385 FT | 43 FLOORS
Drake Hotel redevelopment | 1,000+ ft / 305+ m | 70 FLOORS
Avalon West Chelsea | 27 floors
Park Tower| FT | 20 FLOORS
1045 6th Ave | FT | FLOORS
5 World Trade Center
Avalon Willoughby West | 596 FT | 58 FLOORS

1 WTC 1776 ft
2 WTC 1429 ft
3 WTC 1240 ft
4 WTC 980 ft
C57 1003 ft
Beekman 870 ft
30 Park Place 912 ft
50 West 714 ft
Clinton Park 348 ft
Mt Sinai Center for Science and Medicine 518 ft
56 Leonard 821 ft
International Gem Tower 590 ft
605 W 42nd 60 floors
East Coast LIC 200-316 ft
250 E 57th 715 ft
250 W 55th 592 ft
31 W 15th St 355 ft
111 Washington St 57 floors
292 11th Ave 30 floors
One Madison Ave 937 ft
39 W 23rd St 22 floors
237 W 54th St 34 floors
400 Park Ave S 476 ft
50 W 40th St
855 6th Ave 455 ft
Manhattan West 1216, 935 ft
15 Penn 1216 ft
1045 6th Ave
Girasole 1000 ft
Hudson Yards Phase I 900+ ft x2
Hudson Yards Phase II 10 towers
Atlantic Yards least 8 towers
Tower Verre 1100+ ft
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Old July 29th, 2011, 05:20 PM   #1626
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NY Post

Quote:
$1.225B joint venture to develop WTC retail

By LOIS WEISS

Last Updated: 3:23 AM, July 29, 2011
Posted: 11:28 PM, July 28, 2011



The retail space at the World Trade Center site took a giant step toward becoming a reality yesterday as the executive board of the Port Authority was briefed on a $1.225 billion joint venture with Westfield Properties, The Post has learned.

Long awaited, the deal for the space could climb to $1.3 billion based on the final rental numbers, sources told The Post, which reported first on the deal yesterday at nypost.com. The 50/50 agreement covers 365,000 square feet of retail space with an additional 90,000 square feet to be added as 2 World Trade Center comes on line, the sources added.

HANDOUT

The World Trade Center (pictured here in an artist’s rendering) is being promised a world-class retail development for the site from Australianbased Westfield Properties, which is close to sealing a 50-50 deal valued at $1.225 billion with the Port Authority. The cost of the later square footage will be worked out at that time.

A written agreement still needs to be hashed out that both boards are expected to approve within the next 90 days. The retail space is expected to open in 2015. The deal works out to $3,356 a square foot for the first 365,000 square feet and additional monies will be paid for the next 90,000 square feet.

"After being initially involved with the World Trade Center prior to Sept. 11, 2001, and working with the Port over the last 10 years we are excited about our partnership with them to rebuild the World Trade Center," said Peter Lowy, CEO of Westfield America, who declined to discuss the financial terms of the deal. "We will be creating a world class iconic shopping experience for Lower Manhattan and the City of New York in keeping with the other projects we have done in Sydney, London, San Francisco and Los Angeles."

Westfield had been working with Silverstein Properties and the Port Authority on plans to update the retail mall when the towers were attacked. It later backed away from the rebuilding when it became mired in politics but reserved the right to jump back in. "It's no surprise but a relief that this is finally done because then they will be able to release information," said Robin Abrams of The Lansco Corp. "Before it was impossible to get specific information and now everybody will be focused and Westfield will be able to go forward with the brokerage community and specific tenants that have been waiting on the sidelines."

Abrams called the pricing "hefty," but in line with what has been going on in the city, and therefore expects the retail space will be priced in the "hundreds of dollars" a square foot. "But it will be the center of the universe down there," she added. "The retailers were all waiting to see what would happen at the trade center."

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Old July 29th, 2011, 05:22 PM   #1627
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NY Observer

Quote:
With Land Swap Flop, Moynihan Station Off the Rails Again

By Matt Chaban 7/25 9:51am



It is one of the most mythic and elusive redevelopment projects in the city, the plan to restore at least some of Penn Station’s former glory with a new station inside the old Farley Post Office. But this train could be delayed for good.Moyn* Station broke ground on a no-frills first phase last fall, but it looks like that could be as far as the ambitious station gets if Related and Vornado can’t figure out what to do with their half of the station, according to The Journal. With a year-end deadline looming, the two Steves are coming up short on retail options for Moynihan Station.


"Seeking other options, in recent months the developers have tried to get the City University of New York interested in a land swap plan with the Tribeca-based Borough of Manhattan Community College, the people said.

The developers would have built it a new campus in the back of the post office, and in turn, the developers would have been able to build apartments with unobstructed Hudson River views on the school’s valuable land of the five-block campus along the West Side Highway.

But those talks appear to have fizzled recently, as CUNY officials showed little interest, people familiar with the discussions said."


As if it were not news enough that the Moynihan Station development deal was in doubt, who knew such an audacious, if now ill-fated, landswap was in the works? Those Steves never met a crazy landswap or air rights flip they did not like. After all, it was the plan to move Madison Square Garden into the Farley that derailed the Moynihan project most recently. The Journal also reveals that the developers have been trying to attract Nordstroms or Target, so far to no avail.

[...]
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Old July 29th, 2011, 05:23 PM   #1628
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NY Observer

Quote:
Mo’ MA: Museum’s Inspired, Insipid Tower Returns

Two years and a 200-foot haircut later, Jean Nouvel brings his Torre Verre back to Midtown.

By Matt Chaban 7/26 11:00pm


The Death Spire. (Atelier Jean Nouvel)

New York City may have brought down Dominique Strauss-Kahn, but another torrid Frenchman will not be held up by the likes of us.

Jean Nouvel, winner of the Pritzker Prize and a severe man even by the standards of his profession, delivered unto the city a “real skyscraper” in 2007. The Torre Verre, more commonly known as the MoMA Tower, would rise to 1,250 feet, an obsidian shard piercing the heart of midtown, built on land traded by the museum to a developer, Hines, for $125 million and three floors of galleries in the base of the new building. A rival to the Empire State Building 20 blocks south, The Times’ Niccolai Ouroussoff called it “the most exhilarating addition to the skyline in a generation.”

Mr. Nouvel, in defending his creation to the City Planning Commission, which was then deciding the outsize tower’s fate, said at a July 2009 hearing, “It’s like music, part of the rhythm of the city and the skyline.” Commission chair Amanda Burden was less taken with Mr. Nouvel’s tune, and knocked 200 feet off the top of the tower, bringing it well south of the Chrysler Building it would have eclipsed (and much closer to its as-of-right height).

Among the issues, she deemed the building’s thorny crown an eyesore for visitors to the Empire State Building, a position that drew outcry from the tower’s legion of worshipers. “Approving the design of Tower Verre while lowering the height was not a compromise but an example of curatorial caution run amok, an attempt to turn midtown into an architectural preserve,” wrote Justin Davidson in New York magazine.


The tower will rise to something closer to the bottom of its crown, though its new profile has not been revealed.

Ms. Burden’s burden not withstanding , like many of the starchitectural erections proposed during the boom, the tower was put on hold, left for dead by some. Hines argued during the approval process that the project simply could not work if not approved at its original height. It would simply be too small to justify the expense of such an ambitious tower. So much for so much.

And yet, this is New York. Expensive real estate can always be justified.

Two weeks ago, Hines quietly filed a new set of plans with the Department of City Planning. They are compliant with two special permits that the commission and the City Council approved in the fall of 2009, which enforce the 1,050-foot height along with restrictions on things like a loading dock for the new building and the museum’s sculpture garden fence—something that has been bothering the neighbors ever since the 2003 renovations. According to a department spokesperson, the application is a chair certification, which does not require public approvals. The process is meant to ensure that the project is in accordance with what was previously agreed upon; a review has no set timeframe.

The resolutions required a tower of similar design proportions. How much the new design resembles the old one, just shorter, is not immediately clear. Initially, Hines said it had filed no new plans, but when The Observer pointed to a notice on the City Planning website, spokesman George Lancaster admitted that the project was back on and imminent. “We DID file revised plans with City Planning for the shorter tower adjacent to MoMA,” he wrote in an email. “We aren’t going to release drawings or details just yet but will in the near future.” He would not say whether the project had financing yet.


The controversial crown.

MoMA was equally taciturn. “The filing is Hines’ so I don’t have any details on it here. Our plans with regard to the project remain unchanged,” emailed Margaret Doyle, the museum’s communications director. When asked about something Hines would not discuss, the recently acquired Folk Art Museum and how it might factor into the project, she replied, “MoMA has not yet announced any plans for the Folk Art Museum building.”

“Of course for the neighborhood it’s going to be a problem, because it’s a big, tall building,” said Al Butzel, attorney for the Coalition for Responsible Midtown Development, a local community group that filed an unsuccessful suit against the project last summer. “Ten-fifty is better than 1250, but it’s still much more than we wanted, which was 500, closer to the Financial Times building next door.”

Justin Peyser, co-founder of the group, put it more succinctly and cynically in an email: “Our city has always been for sale to the highest bidder and this bid is awfully high.”

In Paris, they forbid tall buildings, too

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Old July 29th, 2011, 05:25 PM   #1629
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NY Observer

Quote:

Scaling the Towers of Hudson Yards

By Matt Chaban 7/21 1:38pm



It’s funny how a story comes about sometimes.

Following the news that Coach is poised to sign a lease at Hudson Yard, the first of possibly a dozen, a reader wrote in with a simple question: How tall is the bag-maker’s new redoubt? We turned to Google but there was no clear answer, so we asked around to our sources who know the site. Answer: about 1,000 feet. Also, a gentle reminder that, because this is one of the few pieces being built on terra firma, as soon as said lease and some financing is in place, construction can commence and be done by 2015.

What is interesting about this news is it sheds a little more light on the gigantic project and just how big it really is. At 1,000 feet, the KPF-designed south tower would be in the top five tallest buildings in the city, just barely ahead of 7 World Trade and right around the Chrysler Building—if we’re counting antennas, it’s technically surpassed by the Times Building, the old AIG tower and One Bryant Park, but everyone knows you shouldn’t count the antennas, much as Douglas Durst might like to.

Furthermore, a rendering The Observer unearthed back in December reveals this is potentially the shortest of the three commercial towers Related has planned. The rendering above, taken from that wild video, shows only two towers, though this is still a good deal shorter. The eastern flank of Hudson Yards could well surpass the 1,000-foot mark, possibly challenging Steve Roth and Tony Malkin‘s prides of place on the skyline. Our source preferred not to disclose details of the other towers, saying there is “flexibility” in the ultimate design.

Viewed in repose alongside the other buildings in the project in this rendering, it becomes clear that the residential buildings are pretty big, too. This really is like taking a huge chunk of midtown and and the Upper East Side, jamming it together, and plopping it down on two blocks of Hudson River real estate. Then again, 26 million square feet of development have to be wedged in somewhere.

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Old July 29th, 2011, 05:51 PM   #1630
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It's never quite the ride time
NYers like bike lanes - but don't use 'em

New York Post
By JENNIFER FERMINO Transit Reporter
Last Updated: 7:15 AM, July 29, 2011

New Yorkers widely support the Big Apple's widespread bike-lane expansion -- but no one is using them.

More than half of Big Apple residents believe the burgeoning bike lanes are a positive addition to the city, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released yesterday.

But only 29 percent of those respondents felt the lanes were "widely used" -- confirming complaints made by anyone who lives near the green-hued lanes.

The poll of 1,234 registered voters found that 59 percent agreed that the paths were a "good thing because it's greener and healthier," while 35 percent called the lanes "bad" for squeezing cars off the road.

The rest were undecided.

But the bike lanes may not be empty for long, city stats show.

The Department of Transportation -- which has installed about 390 miles in lanes since 2002 -- claimed there was a 14 percent jump from last year in the number of two-wheeled commuters.

The average number of people riding into Manhattan by bike climbed to 16,809 this year, up from 16,463 last year.

It's a 62 percent jump from 2008 figures.

Officials tabulated the stats by dispatching counters to major Manhattan entryways -- like the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges.

But critics charge that those numbers aren't completely accurate.

A better way to gauge the number of cyclists is conducting a survey or heading to the outer boroughs, said Ralph Buehler, a professor at Virginia Tech who studies bicycle trends.

"Doing a survey can be very expensive. It would be a huge amount of people," said Buehler.

"But it could help you learn the overall picture of cycling."

The DOT's process was an attempt to show trends in cycling, not reflect the number of total riders, a spokesman said.

The Quinnipiac poll also shows that the attitudes toward bike lanes are sharply divided by borough.

Manhattan and Bronx residents overwhelmingly support the bike lanes, with 63 percent giving a thumbs-up.

Staten Islanders, on the other hand, are about ready to tear the bike lanes out. Only 38 percent of people in the borough said they supported them.

Sixty percent of Brooklynites liked the lanes, while 55 percent of Queens residents gave them their blessing.

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/i...#ixzz1TVRN8evc
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Old July 29th, 2011, 09:15 PM   #1631
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Originally Posted by desertpunk View Post
This is wonderful news. I do not care about the shorter design, I always thouht that the 'crown' was the weak part.
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Old August 1st, 2011, 05:55 PM   #1632
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Curbed

Quote:
1,000 Feet is Now the Magic Number on 57th Street

Monday, August 1, 2011, by Sara Polsky



Not content to let New York by Gehry hang onto the tall building spotlight for too long, there's an update today on One57, the 57th Street Extell-developed megatower that will probably be starting sales this fall. Twenty-two of 90 floors have been built for the 1,004-foot building, according to the Journal—and since New York by Gehry is only 870 feet tall, One57 might take away the "hemisphere's tallest" crown. The state attorney general's office has already approved sales, and there are contracts out, at prices of around $5,000/square foot. And for whatever doesn't get sold, Extell has an insurance plan: an Abu Dhabi government fund has promised to buy any unsold condo units.

If they do all sell, there will be two other 1,000-foot-and-up options nearby. There's the recently-resurrected, 1,050-foot Tower Verre, which will include residential units. Then there's the former Drake Hotel site, which has the rights to be at least 1,000 feet tall and could include luxury condos. Will there be that many takers for high-end, high-up real estate in Midtown?
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Old August 2nd, 2011, 01:53 AM   #1633
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NY Observer

Quote:
Explosive Extell Demoing West 57th Tire Tower

By Matt Chaban



Gary Barnett continues to bulldoze his way across the city. Just last week, his Extell Development unveiled plans for a new tower at Riverside South; found a partner for a stalled 50-story hotel near Times Square; and secured $700 million in financing from Abu Dhabi toward One57, the condo-hotel tower on West 57th Street that will be the tallest, and likely most expensive, when it is completed. As if that were not enough, the developer has begun work just down the block on another of its long-simmering projects.

At the corner of Broadway and 57th Street, Extell has plans for yet another soaring tower; it will be either commercial or residential, an official decision has not been made. That has not kept the developer from moving ahead with demolition of some of the buildings it owns on the site, a controversial task since Extell fought off an effort by the Landmarks Preservation Commission to preserve two of the structures in 2009.

Extell assembled the T-shaped plot last decade and then took out a $256 million mortgage on it, leading to quite a bit of consternation when the commission unexpectedly decided 1780 Broadway and 225 West 57th Street were worth saving. Once owned by B.F. Goodrich, they are part of a stretch of Jazz Age dealerships known as Automobile Row. In the end, the commission brooked a contentious deal to save 1780 Broadway while allowing 225 West 57th Street to be torn down.

The site, like so many others at the moment, had lain fallow through the downturn but has now reawakened. Between February and June of this year, Extell filed a series of demolition permits for various buildings on 57th and 58th streets, which the Department of Buildings approved last month. One of those buildings is now coming down, with others to follow. “We’re doing salvage work on the interiors of 217 and 221 West 57th and then start this week to take down the three-story 217 floor by floor,” an Extell spokesman said in an email last week.

The spokesman would not disclose whether the project had financing, but that has not stopped Extell before. Demolition commenced years before construction started on either the One57 site or the International Gem Tower in the Diamond District, and both began construction using only Extell’s equity. As shown at One57, this strategy allowed the developer to act faster because Mr. Barnett did not need to wait for the wrecking ball, and his construction progress helped attract investors, a particularly challenging prospect during the current economic malaise.

Extell also declined to discuss an architect or designs for the 57th and Broadway project, which brings the story back to Riverside South.

For years, Mr. Barnett was known for developing rather pedestrian buildings in line with the man he replaced on that redoubt overlooking the Hudson, Donald Trump. More recently, he has striven for greater architectural ambition, hiring SOM for the International Gem Tower and KPF for the aborted World Commerce Centre. Meanwhile, notable firms such as Lucian LeGrange and FXFowle have been designing some of his residential projects.

Perhaps no architect has benefited more than Christian de Portzamparc, the French Pritzker Prize winner who had built nothing in the city besides the LVMH headquarters a decade ago, with few buildings to his name elsewhere. Now, Mr. Barnett has become his biggest patron, tapping Mr. de Portzamparc not only for One57 but also for Riverside Center, the five-tower complex that is the final piece of the Riverside South puzzle. Extell won a tough rezoning fight for the project last year.

Now that Mr. Barnett has turned to Goldstein Hill & West Architects, a firm best known for working with Costas Kondylis on some of the city’s blander buildings, for the final Riverside South tower that is not a piece of Mr. de Portzamparc’s plan, it raises the question of what sort of designs New Yorkers can expect at 57th Street and Broadway. Will it be another Pritzker-worthy prize, or has Extell returned to more pedestrian fare?

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Old August 4th, 2011, 06:09 PM   #1634
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WSJ

Quote:
NY REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL AUGUST 4, 2011.
Tower Deal Is Teetering

By ELIOT BROWN And ANDREW GROSSMAN
As a deadline nears, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and developer Vornado Realty Trust remain far apart over the terms of a deal to build an office tower atop the Port Authority bus terminal, said people familiar with the matter.


Port Authority NY/NJ
A rendering of the planned tower atop the Port Authority Bus Terminal.

The plan to build a tower rising about 40 stories over the terminal has been on the drawing board for more than a dozen years, with momentum ebbing and flowing with the economy's cycles. A tentative deal struck in 2007 between the Port Authority and a team led by Vornado was put on ice during the economic downturn.

Now Vornado stands to lose its designation as the tower's developer if a deal isn't struck by Sunday, based on the terms of an earlier agreement. It is possible the two sides could also extend the deal, as they have done before.

The 2007 deal called for the Vornado team to pay about $500 million over a long-term lease. In the latest round of negotiations, Vornado has been offering less money than the agency has been seeking, people familiar with the discussions said.

The Port Authority is hoping a final pact would provide the agency hundreds of millions of dollars that it would use to renovate and upgrade the bus terminal, the people said. "We continue to be in active discussions with them," said Steve Coleman, a spokesman for the Port Authority.

Planners and Port Authority officials have long dreamed of capping the hulking terminal near Times Square with a glimmering office tower. Over the years, new towers sprouted nearby, changing the image of the once-squalid area and encouraging planners to forge ahead.

Vornado and its partner, Ruben Cos., have effectively had an option on the terminal since they first won the rights to develop it in 1999. But the project has been stuck in the planning stage. Its current plan calls for a 1.3-million-square-foot tower designed by Pritzker Prize-winner Richard Rogers.

The Vornado plan first got sidelined by an economic downturn in 2001. It came back to life toward the end of the last real-estate cycle. But by the time the Vornado team renegotiated its terms with the Port Authority in late 2007, the economy was already beginning to falter.

With the city adding jobs at a faster rate than the rest of the U.S. economy, demand for office space has been slowly rising. But vacancy is well above the low levels it hit in the boom years.

Given the high cost of construction in New York and a lack of clear demand for the new space, a new tower could be a risky bet without a major tenant. New office towers are already rising elsewhere in Manhattan, including at the World Trade Center. The most recent office building to be completed, 11 Times Square, on the other side of Eighth Avenue from the bus terminal, sits more than half vacant after opening in January.

Vornado has been showing detailed plans for the rectangular glass tower to potential tenants, according to people familiar with the matter. Its unusual plan calls for the building's elevators to be on its exterior. That would allow for large, open floors that large financial services companies like.

The firm also has been in discussions with additional investors. Billionaire Chinese real estate investor Zhang Xin is considering investing in the project, she said in a May interview. Ms. Zhang, chief executive of the large Chinese commercial property developer Soho China Ltd., said the potential investment would be separate from Soho China's business.

"It's me personally and privately looking at opportunities," she said.

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Old August 4th, 2011, 06:13 PM   #1635
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Glenwood takes control of stalled Midtown hotel and condo development site
August 03, 2011

By Sarabeth Sanders


Property on West 46th Street and rendering

Glenwood Management has acquired a stalled Midtown West development site for $76.3 million after purchasing the distressed mortgage last year and suing to foreclose on the original developer.

The site, on the west side of Eighth Avenue between 46th and 47th streets, was originally conceived of as a 38-story hotel and condominium tower by Tribeach Holdings, but work stalled in late 2008 when the economy began to slump.

Tribeach, led by principals James Mooney, William Fegan and Adrian Stroie, allegedly defaulted on $78.6 million in loans there in September 2010. As The Real Deal previously reported, Glenwood purchased those loans from Bank of Scotland for an undisclosed price later that month, and in October, moved to wrest control through a foreclosure lawsuit.

Now, Glenwood and Tribeach have settled the lawsuit, according to recent court documents. And a deed filed with the city today shows that on July 26 Glenwood closed on the site, which consists of vacant land, a vacant mixed-use building and a parking lot.

Glenwood, an owner and manager of roughly two dozen high-end rental apartments in Manhattan, is in the midst of an expansion push. Last year, Gary Jacob, Glenwood's executive vice president, told The Real Deal that the company was actively seeking new properties on the West Side. In February, it found one, and paid Fordham University $125 million to acquire a vacant development site and more than 300,000 square feet of development rights on the corner of 62nd Street and Amsterdam Avenue. The company is now planning a residential rental tower with ground-floor retail and parking there.

Tribeach's original plans at the Eighth Avenue site called for a 375-room hotel, and a mix of condos as well as market-rate and subsidized rental apartments. Amenities were to include a pool, bar and restaurant.

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Old August 9th, 2011, 09:36 AM   #1636
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NY REAL ESTATE COMMERCIALAUGUST 8, 2011
Developer Unveils Plans for Site Near Bryant Park



Hines, of Houston, has become the latest developer to join the race to break ground on Manhattan's next office building.

The firm has unveiled the design of a 28-story tower overlooking Bryant Park. The entrance to the building, at the corner of Sixth Avenue and 40th St., will sit at a northeast angle to maximize park views. The design by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners features a concave hourglass and floating stainless steel disk over the entrance.

"This project has really been designed in a way that comes directly out of our residential experience, including outdoor spaces and maximizing daylight," says Tommy Craig, senior vice president of Hines, which is a partner with Pacolet Miliken Enterprises Inc.

But Hines likely isn't going to move forward until it pre-leases a large chunk of the space and obtains construction financing. There are a half-dozen or so other proposed Manhattan developments that are also in this category.

Mr. Craig says Hines is optimistic. "Our conviction about the market would be hard to overstate," he says. "We sold 750 Seventh Avenue with very full pricing and that only reinforced our confidence in the market both from prospective equity partners as well as major tenants."

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Old August 10th, 2011, 12:38 AM   #1637
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MoMeh: Nouvel’s New Museum Tower Looks Very Familiar
By Matt Chaban 8/08




When Amanda Burden and the City Planning Commission cut Jean Nouvel’s Torre Verre down to size, the architectural cogniscenti were dismayed. Hines, the project’s developer, had sworn the project would be financially infeasible 200 feet shorter. At only 1,050 feet, it would no longer rival the Empire State Building on the skyline but instead share a midtown profile with the likes of the Chrysler Building, Rockefeller Center and the MetLife Building. Still, even in a downturn brought on by bombastic overbuilding, real estate has a way of persevering in New York. As The Observer revealed two weeks ago, Hines is currently pursuing a new set of plans for the oft-called MoMA Tower. And here they are.

Hines declined to release new plans, and initially suggested there were none. Through a public information request, The Observer has obtained copies of architectural drawings from the City Planning Commission. While they may not be as sexy as the kind of full-color renderings architects usually prepare to wow the media , they shed plenty of light on the new shape of the project.

Having lost 200 feet in height cost Hines almost 30,000-square-feet of new development in the tower. Instead of rising to 85 stories, all but the top four of which were occupiable, there are now 78 stories, with four stories on top still reserved for mechanical systems, such as elevators and HVAC. The total square footage is roughly 629,000, or about half as much as the bulkier Chrysler Building.

This shrinkage has not appeared to cost Hines much, after all. In approving the project, the City Council required the developer to reduce the number of hotel rooms, a matter that had concerned the neighbors because it can mean lots of transient visitors—not that the Warwick Hotel isn’t across the street, or a huge Hilton on Sixth Avenue. Instead of 147,000 square feet of hotel space, with 167 rooms on the eighth through 17th floor, there is now 96,000 square feet on the eighth through 13th floor—the plans did not detail the number of rooms, but the City Council approval stipulated no more than 100 rooms.

There has actually been a net gain in residential space, to 480,000 square feet, up from 458,000. Instead of spanning the 19th floor through 81st floor, the apartments will be on the 14th floor through the 74th floor. The plans did not state how many units there will be, but some examples can be seen in the plans. Three apartments on the 23rd floor measure 1,847 square feet, 2,263 feet and 2,296 feet, compared to one 5,669-square-foot apartment on the 59th floor. The square-footage of the top most floor, which conceivably would be combined with units below to create a larger duplex or triplex, measures 3,204 square feet.

Space for MoMA in the tower will remain constant at roughly 52,000 square feet, and the plans also call for a restaurant located in the lobby and basement of the building.

As for the appearance of the building, compared to earlier drawings and renderings, it does look a little bit squatter, but not by much, and the articulation of the tower has changed slightly. Viewed from Brooklyn, across the East River, it would not be invisible, appearing somewhere in the lee between One Bryant Park and the old CitiCorp Center. Still, it will not tower over these buildings, either.

Hines declined to comment on the new details for the tower, but it describes the changes thusly in its new application:


The facade consists of several sloped planes at different angles, which ascend to a sharp needles at the top of the building. The tower top is distinguished by three distinct asymetrical peaks, of varying height and shape. The top peak has a vertex with an interior angle of 27 degrees. The facade treatment of the building consists of non-mirrored glass and painted aluminum elements. And the interior structure of the building is expressed on the facade in an aluminum web “Diagrid” pattern of nodes and spokes, which extends from the sidewalk to the top of the building, not including mechanical spaces. The mechanical equipment at the top of the building is set behind a facade of blades, or louvres.”

That last point is of particular note because it was the under-designed nature of the tower’s top that led Ms. Burden to have it shortened.

As before, the redesigned tower is producing a mix of opinions, directed as much at Ms. Burden as at Mr. Nouvel.

Architecture critic and editor Jayne Merkel, when presented with the new plans, felt an appropriate response had been made by the developer. “Most people will see it from below, where it will still look quite tall, somewhat faceted, and thin,” she wrote in an email. “It will not appear to be quite as pencil thin on the horizon as the first scheme would have, but I am not at all sure that that is a problem either. It won’t be lonely in Midtown Manhattan, and I don’t think it is so brilliant that the original height was justified. I suspect that if the revised, shortened tower had been submitted originally, its champions would have liked it just fine.”

Carol Willis, director of the Skyscraper Museum downtown, believes the decision by the city to lower the tower was an unfortunate one. “Manhattan has two big defining characteristics, its vibrant streets and its competitive skyline,” she said. “We’ve done a great job in the past decade with protecting and improving the quality of experience of the ‘sidewalks of New York,’ but I think it’s a shame that the skyline seems to be losing its ambition and diversity.”

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Old August 11th, 2011, 02:18 AM   #1638
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Curbed

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Construction on Two-in-One Midtown Hotel Almost Underway

Wednesday, August 10, 2011, by Bilal Khan



It looks like construction is about to be underway on the 68-story Courtyard and Residence Inn going up on Broadway and 54th. If you'll recall, the building will house two hotels (a 378-room Courtyard by Marriott and a 261-room Residence Inn), and is set to be complete in late 2013. If the semantics of the two-in-one hotel fascinate you, the Times explains the breakdown as such: "the tower will have a main entrance and arrival lobby on West 54th Street; the lobby for the Residence Inn will be on the building’s third floor, and the Courtyard lobby will be on the fourth floor. Courtyard guest rooms will be on floors 6 through 32, while Residence Inn rooms will be on floors 36 through 64; each hotel will have its own elevator banks." You got that?

The Nobutaka Ashihara building is going to rise to 716-feet and the developer, Granite Broadway Property says that it will be the tallest building in New York that's used "strictly for lodging." We suppose that means its 35' shortcoming when stacked next to the Mandarin Oriental at the Time Warner Center is forgiven due to those pesky condos. Officials from Granite Broadway Property and Marriott are expected to give an official statement later today.

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Old August 13th, 2011, 09:46 PM   #1639
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Zombie Zapata Lives!

Chelsea tower comes back to life.

by Alan G. Brake



While the real estate market in New York never stalled as fully as it did in the rest of the country, many projects went on ice. One that seemed unlikely to be revived, a 20-story tower on 23rd street designed by Carlos Zapata, is coming back to life. Initially planned as a hotel by Horizon Global, Abnau Enterprises acquired the lot 39-41 West 23rd for $18.5 million and plans to build the Zapata design as condominiums with ground floor retail.

“Anbau Enterprises’ development philosophy is to create architecturally distinguished buildings that make positive contributions to their neighborhoods. In the case of 39-41 West 23rd Street, we have the ability to bring a brilliant design to life and deliver exceptional, sustainable homes to a neighborhood that is becoming a true 24/7 community,” wrote Barbara van Bueuren and Stephen Glascock, principals at Abnau, in an email. The company is also developing nearby 124 West 23rd, in the belief that Chelsea/Flatiron will continue to perform well as a high-end residential area.

Located in the Ladies Mile Historic district, the Zapata design received approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 2005, which was a major incentive for the developers to retain the scheme. “We really like the design and we have a good working relationship with the architect. This is great news for us since the site is in a landmarked district,” Glascock and van Bueuren wrote. “To change the design would mean going through a new two-year-plus approval process with uncertain results.”

The design respects the existing streetwall with a contextually scaled base, topped with an angled glass-clad tower reminiscent of Zapata’s Cooper Square Hotel. “It was important for the Commission and our team to arrive at a set of rules on which to evaluate the design,” Zapata wrote in an email. “Ultimately, we agreed that the design had to be consistent with the evolution of styles in the district, that the building should be representative of our times and make use of modern technologies, and that the design should maintain a level of quality consistent with the best buildings of the district.”

http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=5556
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Old August 13th, 2011, 10:31 PM   #1640
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LOL The "Pope's Hat" building. An awful tumor rises...
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