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Old April 23rd, 2006, 05:35 AM   #1
ChicagoSkyline
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MISC | Freight rail capital of the world?

What city is it? Show us some proofs that are relating to freight rail only!

Last edited by ChicagoSkyline; April 23rd, 2006 at 05:41 AM.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 06:25 AM   #2
ChicagoSkyline
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Chicago is a great candidate!

Scroll--------------------------------------------->


Some of the freight classification & hump yards in plain sight:





Men like William Ogden understood the importance of a Chicago terminus for
his railroad. Chicago eventually became one of the largest rail centers in the
country; pictured below is just one of Chicago's busy rail yards


Howard Rail Yard




A railroad yard in Chicago, Illinois, (Proviso Yard) operated by the Chicago and North Western Railway as seen in December 1942.

Chicago and North Western Railway towerman R. W. Mayberry operates the retarders at Proviso Yard in Chicago, Illinois, May 1943.


Cicero Avenue Clearing Yard




The satellite image of Chicago metro with views of its railroad infrastructures(classification yards) even from this distant!
Scroll--------------------------------------------->


Some of the chicago's largest freight railroad yards from satellites:
http://maps.google.com/?t=k&om=1&ll=....06377,0.11673
http://maps.google.com/?t=k&om=0&ll=...15908,0.029182
http://maps.google.com/?t=k&om=0&ll=...15896,0.029182
http://maps.google.com/?t=k&om=0&ll=...15971,0.029182
http://maps.google.com/?t=k&om=1&ll=...15988,0.029182
http://maps.google.com/?t=k&om=1&ll=...15988,0.029182






Last edited by ChicagoSkyline; April 24th, 2006 at 06:10 AM.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 06:29 AM   #3
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Chicago: Rail Capital of the World and America’s Transportation Center


“Chicago is in danger of becoming a bottleneck in the nation’s transportation system, and that would have serious consequences – not just for this city, but for the entire nation.”

- Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley

A Growing Demand For Rail Service:
"Over the next 20 years, demand for freight rail service in Chicago is expected to nearly double. "

Chicago: Rail Capital of the World and America’s Transportation Center
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 06:30 AM   #4
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way too many pictures...i have brpadban and my computer still almost crashed.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 06:34 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmancuso
way too many pictures...i have brpadban and my computer still almost crashed.
Ok, I will knock down a few!


Chicago Freight Rail Transportation Profile
Chicago is a major freight crossroads. Two transnational Interstates and all six major North American Class I railroads meet in the region. Chicago also boasts two major airports, a seaport on Lake Michigan, and canal access to the Mississippi River. Table C-12 shows domestic commodity flows into and out of the seven-county Chicago region by mode. Trucking carries 60 percent of these flows, and rail carries another 36 percent. Rail freight flows in the Chicago region are more than double the rail freight in any of the other five study regions.

Chicago is the only city where all six major U.S. and Canadian Class I railroads come together to interchange freight. This includes the two major western U.S. railroads, BNSF and UP, the two major eastern U.S. railroads, CSX and Norfolk Southern, and the two major Canadian railroads, Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP). At least six other private railroads operate in the Chicago region, although the vast majority of the region's rail infrastructure is owned and maintained by the Class I carriers.

It has been estimated that Chicago-area railroads operate 1,200 daily trains and generate more than 3,200 daily truck trips to transfer cargo from yard to yard.102 Freight railroads in Chicago own 74 marshalling yards, including 17 for rail-truck intermodal traffic.

BNSF has four intermodal facilities in the Chicago area: Cicero and Corwith in the city of Chicago, Willow Springs in Hodgkins, and the Logistics Park-Chicago in Elwood (about 40 miles southwest of Chicago).
UP serves Chicago via Springfield from St. Louis and over BNSF trackage from Kansas City. UP has several intermodal facilities, including Yard Center, Global I, Global II, Canal Street, Markham, and Chicago IMX.
CSX maintains intermodal facilities at 59th Street and Bedford Park.
Norfolk Southern has four intermodal facilities in the Chicago area: 47th Street, 63rd Street, Landers Yard, and Calumet (port).
CN has an intermodal facility in Harvey, just south of Chicago.
CP has intermodal facilities in Franklin Park and in Schiller Park (both northwest of downtown Chicago, near O'Hare Airport). CP has also automotive and transload facilities in Chicago.
Figure C-4 illustrates domestic commodity flows by rail between Chicago and the rest of the U.S. Due to its position as the nation's most important rail crossroads, major rail flows move between Chicago and all regions of the U.S. Nearly one-quarter of Chicago's rail tonnage moves to and from the northwest states. This includes large volumes of freight imported from Asia through the ports of Seattle and Portland.

Commodity Flows Into and Out of the Chicago Region, 2003

Mode Tonnage Percent
Trucking 379,532,000 60%

Railroad 223,837,000 36%

Marine Vessel 22,924,000 4%

Aircraft 1,155,000 0.2%

Total 627,448,000 100%

Source: FHWA Freight Analysis Framework (trucking and rail); Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Air Carrier Statistics T-100 database (air); U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Waterborne Commerce of the United States database (marine).

Last edited by ChicagoSkyline; April 23rd, 2006 at 06:48 AM.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 06:37 AM   #6
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Chicago is probably the freight capital of the world.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 06:52 AM   #7
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Impossible to tell.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 06:57 AM   #8
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Rail Freight Futures for the City of Chicago

Economic Development Impacts of Rail Yard Reconfiguration

From a freight railroad viewpoint, needs for rail yards are evolving over time, as some rail yards become more important while others become obsolete. This presents needs for reconfiguring rail yards and transfer facilities to ensure a competitive freight transportation system, and it also presents opportunities for redeveloping abandoned rail yards for residential or commercial uses. To assess those issues, the City of Chicago embarked on a study to evaluate options for redeveloping its unused rail yards and consolidating existing rail yards. Its goals were to increase the efficiency of freight movement in the City, improve the city's economic development opportunities, reduce unnecessary truck incursion into neighborhoods, and support redevelopment of urban neighborhoods.
To address these issues, a team led by Reebie Associates with Economic Development Research Group conducted a study of the business and economic consequences of alternatives for redeveloping freight yards, shifting patterns of truck movements and rail loading facilities within the City. EDR Group was responsible for economic impact modeling (using the REMI model), building upon business surveys to trace how business locations and operating costs would be affected by alternative scenarios for reconfiguring truck and rail facilities. The study also examined how the economy of Chicago would be affected by commercial redevelopment of rail yards.

The economic modeling by EDR Group study found that alternatives for reconfiguring the spatial pattern of rail freigtht activity could cause a loss or gain of up to 15,000 jobs, representing a swing of 1-2% growth or decline in the regional economy. The study concluded that moving rail facilities out of the City would lead to outmigration of some shippers, and that a regional rail freight strategy promoting "rationalization" and reinvestment of rail yards within the City would provide the greatest economic benefit.



http://www.edrgroup.com/edr1/library...-freight.shtml
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 07:09 AM   #9
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Corwith Intermodal Yard - Freight Facility BNSF Railway-Chicago


Hanson-Wilson provided engineering services to the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway Co. (BNSF) for the remodeling and rehabilitation of its Corwith Intermodal Yard freight facility in Chicago.

The facility occupies 317 acres in downtown Chicago and is bordered on three sides by heavily traveled urban streets. Efforts to conserve space take a high priority. Hanson-Wilson's improvements to increase access and traffic circulation, while more efficiently accommodating continually increasing intermodal traffic, include:

Designing and constructing a bridge to carry three existing tracks over a new access
Keeping approximately three tracks operating during bridge construction
Designing and constructing four new 4,000-foot intermodal strip tracks
Re-spacing two intermodal strip tracks
Removing 14 general freight tracks
Leveling the grade at the south end of the yard
Reconfiguring tracks to permit 27 general freight tracks to converge, compensating for decreased capacity as a result of the new intermodal tracks
Relocating and installing high mast lights to improve night visibility
Replacing the asphalt pavement on Parking Lot 8 with a 19-inch concrete surface to support four loaded, stacked containers
Demolishing a freight house and constructing a parking lot to create space to store empty chassis

Expanding the third floor control tower at the 38th Street office.
In addition, Hanson-Wilson completed design and construction management of chassis rack relocations, site drainage, parking lot resurfacing, a sound wall to shield the adjacent residential area from rail yard noise, and locker room renovation.

Future plans for Corwith Intermodal Yard include new locomotive fueling facilities, a new checkpoint facility and relocating crane and trailer repair areas. Hanson-Wilson continues to provide project management, engineering, surveying, permitting and construction management during these projects.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 07:11 AM   #10
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Chicago: Fluid at Last

Close cooperation, good communications, and trust are keeping freight and passenger traffic rolling free in the vital Chicago Gateway.
By Tom Judge, Engineering Editor


Some people say when you get railroads together, they can't even agree on the time of day. In fact, probably the last time the railroads in Chicago all agreed on something, the topic was the time of day-the creation of Standard Time. But this is now the 21st Century. To survive, railroads have to learn to cooperate rather than agreeing once every 100 years.

How vital is Chicago? About one-third of the rail traffic in the U.S. originates, terminates, or passes through the area. In 1999, the Chicago Gateway was in trouble. Dwell time in the major yards was averaging 41 hours. Throughput was averaging 45 hours. Metra commuter trains and Amtrak intercity trains were getting delayed by freight traffic.

Things came to a head with a winter storm a couple of years ago. "We had a very tough winter storm come through Chicago in 1998-99, just after the holidays," says Gregory Stengem, Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway vice president-safety, training, and operations support. "First it wreaked havoc on the western roads, then it hit Chicago and moved to the East. It was a terrible storm, lasting 10-12 days. As the western roads were digging out, we started increasing our volumes back toward Chicago. Then Chicago had to dig out. Then the East got severely impacted. It ended up taking us about 90 days to recover from that one storm."

All of the railroad chief operating officers got together to do something about the situation. Because of the importance of the Chicago Gateway to all, they decided the railroads needed to treat Chicago as an integrated terminal. For all of the U.S. Class I's, Chicago is the end of the line. "So we had to develop an integrated transportation plan to manage throughput," says Stengem.

In April 1999, the railroads put together the Chicago Planning Group. The team is made up of representatives from BNSF, CSX Transportation, Canadian National, Canadian Pacific, Norfolk Southern, and Union Pacific, as well as Wisconsin Central, Belt Railway of Chicago, Indiana Harbor Belt, and the two passenger carriers, Metra and Amtrak. The group was charged with looking at the management processes in place in Chicago and seeking improvements.

The Chicago Planning Group set up two task forces. First was the service design group, which also included representatives from each of the home roads. "We looked at everyone's transportation plan, then we sat down to examine what conflicts the plans were causing on each one of the corridors," says Stengem. "Then we started integrating those service design transportation plans. We reduced a lot of congestion that way. We also studied all the cars that were directed toward the Chicago Gateway. We did some analysis on that, then rerouted about 1,000 cars out of the gateway to other gateways to lessen pressure on Chicago."

Operating officers in Chicago were so busy with tactical execution of the plan that another group was needed to look at the systemic areas. So the railroads formed the Chicago Transportation Coordination Office (CTCO) on Jan. 1, 2000. Again, each road assigned a senior officer to work with the group.

CTCO is based in the Metra Dispatching Center just south of Chicago's Union Station. Activity for every line in the area is displayed on screens at the Metra building. CTCO can see the traffic volume just as the dispatcher sees it. This is not the command and control system, just an overview.

"We are at the heart of a coordinating group that is striving for greater fluidity through better personal interface at the local operations level," says Metra Chairman Jeffrey R. Ladd. "We are there because the competing freight railroads see us as neutral."

Scott Murry, formerly superintendent on NS, directs CTCO. Paul McVey of BNSF is assistant director. CTCO reports directly to the Chicago Planning Group. CTCO's charge is to watch the traffic flow directed toward Chicago and to start working on an integrated lineup pulled together on a website. For the first time, railroaders can see, from the industry level, the flows into Chicago as well as the inventory in Chicago and start taking preventive action if volume increases by directing traffic to different routes within the city.

If a single Class I or switching carrier was having difficulty due to incidents upstream in its network that could have a direct impact on Chicago as it broke loose, the group would take action. For example, if BNSF had a derailment and didn't send anything because the line was blocked for 48 hours, the railroad would have three days of business headed toward Chicago at one time. CTCO would manage those out of the ordinary flows.

This group also takes on initiatives where there are systemic problems. For example, if there is a problem with excessive train delays or re-crewing, then CTCO will sit down with the players associated with that specific area to work out long-term solutions. These might include service design changes or capital improvements for choke points.

The results of their efforts over the course of the past year-and-half, in association with the service design team and local operating officers, "have taken dwell time at the major yards in Chicago from 41 hours down to about 27," says Stengem. "Those are averages for the whole year. There are many days with dwell time less than 24 hours. That pretty much mirrors what the industry average is for major facilities. They've done a marvelous job in that area. Throughput crosstown was at 45 hours and is now averaging about 32. Again, that's a tremendous improvement."

Metra delays due to freight interference have decreased by 50% since CTCO's inception. "That's the result of the Chicago Planning Group's intense efforts at these bilateral meetings that have helped us clean up the service design offerings in Chicago," says Stengem. "In 1999, freight interference delays were about 30%. It's down to 14% right now."

CTCO also coordinates track work within the Chicago terminal. For example, if BNSF is doing work on one main, CSXT and NS don't take out another main and restrict flow. CTCO has an integrated maintenance plan for Chicago that only allows one corridor or one track in a corridor to be down at a time.

The Chicago Planning Group worked on the development of a computer model of the Chicago Gateway, believed to be the most complex railroad model in the world. Included in the model are Chicago's 893 miles of track, 125 interlockings, 57 separate yards, 4,600 control points (either a switch or a speed zone change), and all operating characteristics. The model includes 14,000 cars per day pointed toward Chicago, as well as more than 700 passenger trains and 500 freight trains.

"We can use this model to make changes in Chicago because we can look at the situation from a physical characteristic perspective," says Stengem. "We overlay our transportation plan, then let the model resolve the best operation for us. That way, we're not pushing problems from one corridor to another. We can see the downstream effects before we implement the change. It will help us identify the corridors where we need to make service design and physical plant changes."

Rest of article
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 07:59 AM   #11
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Chicago, does actually probably win this, for once...
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 08:26 AM   #12
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The only possible contender against Chicago would be HK/Shenzhen in China. The metro area moves a quarter of all Chinese imports and exports, which is over $400 billion of merchandise annually. And obviously the goods have to arrive via rail before being shipped. I wonder how this stacks up against Chicago's colossal shipments of agricultural products.

London and Tokyo are in island nations, and do not transport much freight via rail.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 08:28 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jue
The only possible contender against Chicago would be HK/Shenzhen in China. The metro area moves a quarter of all Chinese imports and exports, which is over $400 billion of merchandise annually. And obviously the goods have to arrive via rail before being shipped. I wonder how this stacks up against Chicago's colossal shipments of agricultural products.

London and Tokyo are in island nations, and do not transport much freight via rail.
That's the name that I was thinking of.

It probably would be HK/Shenzen.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 08:31 AM   #14
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ChicagoSkyline, this colossal hard-on you have for anything and everything Chicago is starting to make us look bad.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 08:31 AM   #15
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That is not certain. Hong Kong is the busiest intermodal transport hub in the world, but how rail figures into that title is obscure. Chicago moves a titanic amount of foodstuffs, i.e. much of the country's agricultural production. It's very impressive; hell, even the agricultural hubs like North Platte, Nebraska are gigantic.
Quote:
ChicagoSkyline, this colossal hard-on you have for anything and everything Chicago is starting to make us look bad.
Yeah, nobody appreciates jerking off to a city. :d
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 08:54 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hydrogen
ChicagoSkyline, this colossal hard-on you have for anything and everything Chicago is starting to make us look bad.
Hydrogen, please be productive regarding to the topic, no one asked for your feelings, thanks and appreciated!
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 01:14 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Facial
Chicago is probably the freight capital of the world.
I agree. The rail freight capital of the world must be in the USA because there are not very much freight on rail in Europe or Japan. Chicago is the biggest hub in USA...so, it's probabilly Chicago.

Maybe in the futur, Shangai, Peking or Bombay could become big hubs.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 01:50 PM   #18
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@ChicagoSkyline - you have fought so hard for this, so you deserve it - I say, when it comes to freight Chicago wins
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 01:56 PM   #19
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Yeah you were really were fighting in that railroad capital thread. But sure, freight-only, Chicago wins.
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 05:41 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eomer
I agree. The rail freight capital of the world must be in the USA because there are not very much freight on rail in Europe or Japan. Chicago is the biggest hub in USA...so, it's probabilly Chicago.

Maybe in the futur, Shangai, Peking or Bombay could become big hubs.
Beijing is not a port, and therefore had no business being a freight hub. Shanghai has the world's busiest port, but I can't seem to find the city's rail statistics.
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