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Greater Manchester Transport Projects Transport Matters For Greater Manchester and Surrounding Areas



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Old May 25th, 2006, 11:03 PM   #61
Uncle Remus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metrolink


* A new through train service will link to Manchester Airport to Carlisle and Scotland
This will be a logical extension of the existing two-hourly Manchester - Scotland service operatated by Virgin XC. however it is dependent upon the new third platform at Manchester Airport (partly funded by Northern Way) which has gone out to tender (I think).

There is also the possibility of this route being transfered over to TPE in the future.
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Old May 27th, 2006, 03:33 PM   #62
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Id love to see through London - Manchester - Bolton - Preston - Carlisle - Glasgow trains, if only the line was electrified between Manchester and Preston.
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Old May 27th, 2006, 03:46 PM   #63
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With Salford Quays and Salford Uni due to take off very shortly (fingers crossed anyway), is there any logic in expanding Salford Cresent into a major station, on the same lines as Stockport and Bolton, where Virgin would be welcome?

At the minute its just a shed, with two platforms. I think the problem is where it is, but further around the corner of the line is Middlewood Locks, so maybe if it was moved round there, it would be a more viable an option.

Just a thought anyway
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Old May 27th, 2006, 07:57 PM   #64
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Id love to see the Castlefield Curve completed and a major station built on the junction of the 3 lines, that would be nice to see.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 12:07 AM   #65
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M60 is now cone/sign free.

Traffic jams/tail backs both ways this afternoon.

The 10 lane stretch looks awesome. Gets me to work in 15 minutes.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:37 AM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrb
M60 is now cone/sign free.

Traffic jams/tail backs both ways this afternoon.

The 10 lane stretch looks awesome. Gets me to work in 15 minutes.

Went through it about 5 or 6 times today, very odd, lots of people doing 50MPH unsure as to wether there were any speed cameras (OK so the flash on my camera going off several times by "accident" didn't help matters )
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:41 AM   #67
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I dont get it.
Does jcb mean that all restrictions have been lifted but there were tailbacks anyway?
Thats doesnt bode well does it?
12 lanes anyone?
If so it only goes to prove that you can build more lanes but it doesnt cut congestion.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:41 AM   #68
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Heard about the new lights filter system they've put on some of the slips onto the M60, apparently its all the rage in the states, makes the traffic on the main motorway lanes flow a bit more freely, we'll see about that!
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Old June 14th, 2006, 11:14 AM   #69
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edit..

was posted in the airport thread where it belonged
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Old June 14th, 2006, 06:35 PM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rolybling
Heard about the new lights filter system they've put on some of the slips onto the M60, apparently its all the rage in the states, makes the traffic on the main motorway lanes flow a bit more freely, we'll see about that!
Trying my best not to be pedantic Roly but they've been using traffic light signals at busy freeway entrance ramps in many North American cities for the past 30 years! Toronto was one of the first places to introduce them. You would have to say that they do actually work, as they are only 'deployed' during the rush (ha ha) hours. You also have to bear in mind that big-city traffic gridlock in N.A. is far more congested than just about anywhere in the world. The UK is a doddle compared, trust me. Imho, the sensible placement of roundabouts are a massive help to the steady movement of heavy traffic in the UK. I don't know why they don't install them here, it's not like we don't have the space is it?
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Old June 14th, 2006, 06:43 PM   #71
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They have them on Junction 1 of the M55 in Preston. Again, only turned on during rush hour.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 07:17 PM   #72
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There have had them on J9 (Walsall) of the M6 for ages.
Nowt new.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:01 PM   #73
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Theyve put the price of my monthly bus pass up £2 to £49 just 2 months after changing it from a monthly pass to a 28 day pass (which in effect added an extra month to the year so an extra £50 a year) :-(
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Old June 18th, 2006, 11:45 PM   #74
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A57(M) Mancunian Way

The Mancunian Way, nearly 2 miles in length included the first section of truly urban motorway to be constructed in the Region.

It is a lateral road along the southern fringe of the central area of the City of Manchester. Its primary purpose was to carry the traffic, much of it commercial, moving between the industrial areas on the east side of the conurbation through to Manchester Docks and Trafford Park. Formerly, most of this traffic had to pass through the centre of the City and, in consequence, caused considerable congestion.

A further important function of the road was to act as a distributor between the heavily trafficked main radial roads south of the City centre.

It was the intention that it would form part of a comprehensive network of urban motorways envisaged in the SELNEC (South East Lancashire and North East Cheshire) Highway Plan of 1962.

The early proposals for the route were formulated in 1959, following traffic surveys carried out by the then City Engineer and Surveyor. It was decided that the road would have to be elevated on the section from west of Medlock Street to just east of Sackville Street, a length of approximately 1400 yards. This was the only practicable way of providing the necessary grade separation at the closely spaced intersections of the motorway with Medlock Street, Cambridge Street, Oxford Road and Brook Street, all of which are important radial routes.

The City Council was the Highway Authority for the scheme and the design of the ground level roads, service diversions, drainage and landscaping was carried out by the City Engineer and Surveyor. G Maunsell & Partners, Consulting Engineers, were appointed to undertake the design of the elevated structure and the supervision of the construction of all the works.

The statutory procedures for the other motorways in the Region were undertaken in accordance with the requirements of the various Highways Acts applicable at the time. In contrast, the Corporation promoted a Parliamentary Bill to authorise the construction of the Mancunian Way and this received Royal Assent in 1961.

The project was carried out in two stages. Work on the first stage, which involved the construction of a 950 yard length of all-purpose length of dual carriageway east of A6, started in November 1963. It was opened to traffic in November 1965.


The second stage, between A6 and the A56 was designed as a motorway and construction commenced in December 1964. It included the elevated section, which is a prestressed concrete structure 3232 feet 6 inches long between the end abutments. Of the thirty two spans, twenty eight are each 105 feet long, two are 60 feet to accommodate ground level features and the eastern and western spans are 97 feet 6 inches and 75 feet respectively.

Between Cambridge Street and Brook Street the layout changes from dual two-lane to dual three-lane carriageways. With a lane width of 11 feet, the overall width of the eastern part of the structure is 79 feet and elsewhere, 61 feet. Ramped connections from the local road system are provided at Cambridge Street and Brook Street.

The main carriageways were designed for a speed of 40 mph and to have a minimum radius of 1500 feet and maximum superelevation of 1 in 35. The maximum gradient was to be 1 in 25, and 1 in 19 on the intermediate ramps where the minimum radius was 109 feet, both made necessary by the need to accommodate the basic geometry of the existing ground level road network.

The bedrock is predominantly Bunter Sandstone of Triassic age, but over a short length adjacent to the West Manchester Fault the bedrock is Manchester Marl of Permian age. The rock is overlain by glacial drift varying in depth from about 8 to 47 feet, the depth being greatest near the middle of the alignment.

The standard foundation consists of two reinforced concrete bored piles and a linking pile cap under each column. The two piles, placed transversely to the main centre line of the structure, provide a 'couple' to resist the high lateral moments due to eccentric live loading, bearing restraint, centrifugal and wind forces, while the smaller longitudinal moments from friction are counteracted by the piles in bending. The piles are between 3 feet and 4 feet 6 inches in diameter and are belled out in the solid sandstone bedrock. The maximum base diameter of 7 feet was used in the region of the West Manchester Fault, where the piles were founded in marl. Before each pile was cast the footing was visually inspected and in many cases in situ plate bearing tests made to confirm the suitability of the rock to withstand the design loading.

The reinforced concrete columns are of rectangular solid section, tapering on the longitudinal sides and vertical on the transverse faces. They are monolithic with the pile caps.

The main structural element is a hollow box spine beam with the top slab cantilivered out on both sides. Over 85% of the superstructure is constructed with precast concrete units of uniform cross section. The transition section between the two and three lane parts of the structure is formed with in-situ concrete, and includes the ramps which carry a single traffic lane.

In contrast to the Hammersmith Flyover, when three basic types of precast unit were used for the beams, cantilevers and deck slabs, the functions of all three were combined in a single unit. As a result, both the casting and erection were simpler and more economic.

The joints between the segments were of in-situ concrete of 3 inch nominal thickness to allow for irregularities in the casting of the units and some latitude in erection.

After positioning the units on staging and the completion of jointing, Freyssinet multi-strand prestressing cables were threaded through pre-formed ducts within the webs.

The extremities of the superstructure, including the intermediate ramps, are terminated in solid reinforced concrete end blocks which formed effective anchorages for the main prestressing cables.

An embossed copper waterproofing membrane was laid over the entire carriageway area followed by a 2¾ inch thick double layer of hot rolled asphalt surfacing.

The bridge over the River Medlock was constructed with a deck of standard precast prestressed beams spanning 38 feet 7 inches.

The eighteen pedestrian subways included in the scheme were designed as reinforced concrete box culverts with the walls finished in glazed tiles.

The second stage was opened to traffic in March 1967.

The traffic islands beneath the elevated section were extensively landscaped in order to provide attractive secluded rest areas for local residents. Areas flanking the road along its entire length received similar treatment.

The 'Mancunian Way' was officially opened by Mr Harold Wilson, on the 5th of May 1967, the second time a section of motorway in the Region had been opened by the Prime Minister in office.
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Old June 21st, 2006, 10:40 PM   #75
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Rail frequency between Manchester - Birmingham will increase to three trains per hour when the new Cross Country and West Midlands franchises start in Autumn 2007. As anticipated the Manchester - Scotland Cross Country service is likely to be transferred to TPE. It wouldn't suprise me if the soon to be surplus to requirements Adelante fleet will transfer to First TPE and First Scotrail.

New West Midlands Franchise
Quote:
introduction of a new hourly Birmingham – Manchester semi-fast service operated by Desiro trains. This is proposed to call at Wolverhampton, Penkridge (peak hours only), Stafford, Stone, Stoke-on-Trent, Congleton, Macclesfield, Prestbury, Adlington, Poynton, Bramhall, Cheadle Hulme and Stockport. Calls may also be possible at certain stations between Birmingham and Wolverhampton, and at Kidsgrove. This service may take the place of certain current Macclesfield – Manchester local services
in order to avoid duplication.
New Cross Country Franchise
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Cross Country currently operate a number of services between Manchester and Scotland. It is proposed that these services will cease and the rolling stock will be used to operate services between North Wales and London. However, it is proposed that Trans Pennine Express (TPE) extend their existing services from Manchester Airport to the North West on to Glasgow and Edinburgh. The frequency of these services will be not less than that operated by Cross Country today and the journey times will be similar.
It is proposed to speed up the services between Manchester and Birmingham to give shorter journey times between these two key cities. These services will stop at Stockport, Wilmslow, Crewe and Wolverhampton on one service in each hour and to Stockport, Macclesfield, Stoke and Wolverhampton on the other service each hour. Other stations will be served by a new West Midlands service between Birmingham and Manchester and by the existing service between Birmingham and Liverpool. It is expected that Stafford will still be served by New Cross Country in the peak.
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 10:55 AM   #76
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All good news.
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 09:41 PM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrb
M60 is now cone/sign free.

Traffic jams/tail backs both ways this afternoon.

The 10 lane stretch looks awesome. Gets me to work in 15 minutes.
Good for you JRB!
It's a shame they don't spend time and money working on a sustainable trasport system so that the 25% of Mancs without access to a car can get to work as well. It takes me over an hour to travel five miles to work, if we had Metrolink sorted it would take me 15 minutes to get to work as well.
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 09:43 PM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Miles Platting
Trying my best not to be pedantic Roly but they've been using traffic light signals at busy freeway entrance ramps in many North American cities for the past 30 years!
Like I said, they're all the rage in the States
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 11:44 PM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rolybling
Like I said, they're all the rage in the States
No Roly baby, they were 'all the rage' 30 freakin' years ago!

They are what you would now call a normal, everyday, common or garden variety, expected, regular part of our big-city urban freeway experience.

For the past several years, 'dedicated car-pool lanes' (two or more occupants) could be me a more appropriate candidate for being 'all the rage'.

Like I said, there is a much bigger need for these measures on this side of the pond.
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Old June 23rd, 2006, 12:06 AM   #80
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I know I know, I've been there and seen them, me saying "all the rage" wasn't meant like its a new thing there, I'm glad they are introducing them more here though, like Longford said there's some on the M6 J9 or 10, it's good they have put some on the M60, about bleeding time, they should work wonders.
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