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Old September 16th, 2004, 07:16 PM   #121
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One of Cathay Pacific's key gateways in North America is Vancouver. Not only does it fly to Vancouver daily, flights continuing to Toronto and New York also stop there. Here is a CX 747 at Vancouver International Airport (YVR) :

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Old September 17th, 2004, 04:09 PM   #122
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HK's Cathay Pac to sell $118 mln bond - Basis Point.
16 September 2004
(c) 2004 Reuters Limited

HONG KONG, Sept 16 (Reuters) - Hong Kong's dominant airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. (0293.HK), will hold presentation for a S$200 million (US$118.5 million), five-year bonds in Singapore on Monday, debt market news service Basis Point said.

It quoted sources as saying on Thursday that DBS Bank would join Standard Chartered Bank as the lead managers for the proposed bond sale.

StanChart was recently heard sounding out the market for up to S$250 million bond at a coupon rate of 40 to 42 basis points over the Singapore dollar swap-offer rate, it said.

Cathay said in August that it may raise up to US$150 million through a Singapore dollar note issue to help expand its fleet.

Cathay plans to expand its fleet to 103 aircraft from 86 in three years. It has announced plans to lease one and buy seven used Boeing (BA.N) 747-400s. Four of these would be converted into freighters. Three of the aircraft would be bought from Singapore Airlines Ltd. (SIAL.SI).
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Old September 17th, 2004, 05:30 PM   #123
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The Wing - HK Airport

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Old September 17th, 2004, 08:22 PM   #124
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Cathay burns up fuel budget

Dennis Eng
368 words
15 September 2004
The Standard


The high price of oil may see Cathay Pacific Airways bust its fuel budget for the year, chief operating officer Philip Chen has warned.

In an internal company notice, Chen said that exorbitant oil prices would push Cathay's full-year fuel expenses beyond its initial HK$1 billion budget. He added that fuel costs for the first half have already exceeded that of the previous year by HK$400 million.

Fuel costs, which accounted for 17 per cent of the airline's total operating costs two years ago, climbed to 22 per cent in the first-half and 25 per cent in mid-August, he said.

Cathay Pacific was one of the airlines which won approval from Hong Kong's Civil Aviation Department to extend and increase a surcharge on air fares to offset high oil prices, which have hovered at more than US$40 (HK$312) a barrel for most of the year.

Analysts said airlines may choose to exploit higher air ticket prices even when jet fuel costs normalise, particularly in China where domestic oil prices are already regulated and carriers did not suffer as much as international airlines.

Jet fuel costs have only increased 5-6 per cent for China Eastern and China Southern Airlines in the first half compared with about 20 per cent in the international market.

Still, before the oil crisis, passengers travelling on China's carriers were typically paying for tickets discounted by 25 per cent from the reference price. Now, the discount is about 20 per cent.

Prices were reformed in China in April this year, leading to more expensive air travel as domestic airlines hiked ticket prices by about 10 per cent in one week.

``Prices were then reduced but not to previous levels,'' Merrill Lynch analyst Trina Chen said.

She attributed the price hike to the oil crisis, strong demand and market consolidation.

Dragonair admitted that while oil prices were affecting earnings it did not plan to raise ticket prices. ``Although the temporary fuel surcharge is only partially offsetting the impact, Dragonair has no plan to adjust the ticket fare at this time,'' said spokeswoman Floran Lee.

Source: The Standard.
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Old September 19th, 2004, 07:47 AM   #125
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The Star Online (Malaysia)
Saturday September 18, 2004
Airline food was never this good
Story by JESSIE TEH

It was raining when two other journalists and I landed at Hong Kong International Airport. But the rain was no dampener – certainly not when a Rolls-Royce was waiting to ferry us to our hotel.

It was smooth cruising along the North Lantau Expressway towards Kowloon, and some 45 minutes later, we arrived at The Peninsula, one of the world’s legendary hotels. The three-day trip, sponsored by Cathay Pacific Airways and The Peninsula, was for us to savour Cathay Pacific’s “Best Chinese Food In The Air” and to experience the modern comforts of The Peninsula.

We were shown to our rooms, and, boy, were they spacious! And high-tech, too. The bedside panels controlled not only the TV and lights, but even the curtains. At the touch of a button, the curtains parted, offering a stunning view of Victoria Harbour.

Our culinary journey began that evening on the hotel’s 26th floor, at The Peninsula Suite, the pride of the establishment. Fit for a king, the suite was designed to be the most spectacular in Hong Kong and one of the most luxurious in the world. While sipping cocktails and nibbling on canapés, we took in the spectacular harbour view.

Later, somewhat reluctant to leave such opulence, we were ushered to the Spring Moon Chinese Restaurant on the first floor. Dinner, hosted by director of public relations Lamey Chang, started off with an appetiser combination of Steamed Prawns with Egg-white Sauce, Lamb Chops with Leeks in Gravy, Sautéed Chicken and Cucumber with Chilli Paste, and Sliced Seabass with Preserved Vegetables. We rounded it all off with Bird’s Nest Soup with Diced Seafood and Beaten Egg.

These are the restaurant’s 30-odd exquisite dishes that are being served on virtually all Cathay Pacific flights in all classes until Oct 31.

Barely able to move after that sumptuous spread, we were hurried along to our next food stop – Gaddi’s, which is known for its gourmet French cuisine. There, we simply had to make room for the delightful Roasted Seabass Fillet on Sautéed Capers, Olives, Octopus and Broad Beans with Fettuccine and a Lemon Butter Sauce.

The next stop was Felix, located on the 28th floor. The fashionable restaurant was designed by renowned French architect-designer-inventor Philippe Starck. The focal point of the restaurant is The Long Table, which can be transformed from a cocktail/dining area into a catwalk for fashion shows or exhibitions. There, we enjoyed coffee and tea and relaxed in a fun and lively setting.

The next day, a 15-minute flightseeing tour by helicopter around Hong Kong had to be postponed to the following morning owing to the weather. Flights depart from The Peninsula’s rooftop helipad. The view from The Peninsula’s Aerospatiale Squirrel of Hong Kong’s metropolis, coastline and outlying islands was breathtaking.

After the high-flying experience, we bade farewell to The Peninsula. The ever-faithful Rolls Royce whisked us off to the airport where we were met by representatives from Cathay Pacific Catering Services (CPCS).

CPCS is located about 10 minutes’ drive away from the airport, and it allowed us to witness how airline food is prepared. So we donned face masks, coats, hair caps and shoe covers and thoroughly washed our hands before CPCS marketing and customers services manager Leslie Bailey took us around.

In the kitchens, which included Japanese, special meals and kosher sections, we were warned by the affable Bailey “not to stick our finger into any food”. It was obvious that hygiene was top priority. The kitchen staff were all garbed in masks, hair caps and white coats. The place resembled a laboratory more than a kitchen!

We couldn’t help being impressed with the care taken to prepare the meals and refreshment for airline passengers. I, for one, was especially impressed with the way the watermelons were soaked in water for two hours because the skin, as pointed out Bailey, “is very dirty”. Unfortunately, owing to the tight schedule, we didn’t get to sample the dishes that had been painstakingly laid out by the chefs.

From the clinically clean CPCS, we rushed back to the airport to lunch at The Haven, located at the The Wing’s first class lounge. It is one of two premium lounges at the airport. Lunch, hosted by Cathay Pacific’s corporate communication manager (overseas) May Lam-Kobayashi and corporate communication executive Julie Ho, comprised noodles and a buffet spread offering a range of Asian and European cuisines.

We couldn’t resist peeking into one of the five cabanas there. The cabana is a lavish spa room where passengers can refresh themselves before their flight and settle down for a soak in an enormous bathtub. Too bad we didn’t have time to indulge in a soak.

Soon it was time for goodbyes. On board, I heartily tucked into the fruits and beef brisket noodles, confident that they had been prepared with meticulous and tender loving care.

Website : http://thestar.com.my/services/print...p&sec=features
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Old September 20th, 2004, 08:17 PM   #126
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Cathay Pacific City @ HK Airport
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Old September 21st, 2004, 12:59 PM   #127
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what are these?
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Old September 22nd, 2004, 04:52 PM   #128
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22 September 2004
oneworld named world’s best airline alliance again



Tuesday, 21 September 2004, London: oneworld has been named the world’s Best Airline Alliance again by some of the most frequent of the world’s flyers.

It received its latest honour in the 2004 Business Traveller Awards. The magazine presents its trophies based on the findings of its annual poll of its readers, who include some of the most widely traveled passengers around the world.

It is the second time that oneworld has received this award in three years it has been presented. oneworld was also named the World's Leading Airline Alliance in the most recent World Travel Awards, and based on votes cast by 80,000 travel agencies professionals from more than 200 countries.

oneworld Managing Partner John McCulloch said: “This is a great vote of confidence from some of our key customers. It reflects the quality of our airline members, our lead in serving more countries and in offering more alliance fare products than our competitors, and our determination to deliver alliance customer service better than any one else.”

oneworld members virtually swept the board in the various airline categories. British Airways took seven prizes – as best airline overall and best for first class, business class, economy class, longhaul travel, shorthaul airline and frequent flyer programme. American Airlines was voted top North American airline. Members of rival alliances managed just two honours between them.

In the other leading industry awards this year - the 2004 OAG Airline of the Year and the 2004 SkyTrax Airline of the Year - its partner airlines gained more accolades than members of both its competitor alliances combined.

In the 2004 Airline Strategy Awards, run by the highly-regarded Airline Business magazine, oneworld carriers take four of the six awards. Members of other alliances did not receive a mention between them. The top prize, for Executive Leadership, is won a oneworld carrier for the third year running, keeping it in the alliance’s hands since the award’s inception. Airline Business’ US counterpart Air Transport World also presented more awards to the grouping’s partners than to members of other global alliances at its prize-giving ceremony in January, selecting Qantas as its overall Airline of the Year, with another special award for Aer Lingus.

oneworld – comprising Qantas, Cathay Pacific, Iberia, LAN, Finnair and Aer Lingus besides American Airlines and British Airways - is the most international of the global airline alliances, serving more countries than any of its rivals, a total of 135 territories. It also offers a wider range of alliance fare and sales products than all the competition combined.

Reflecting the quality of its partners, it was also the only alliance whose members ended last year with a collective profit.

The alliance is aimed at providing more services and value for its partners and their customers than any airline can achieve on its own. For passengers, this includes the opportunity to earn and redeem frequent flyer miles and points across the combined 575-destination oneworld network and, for top-tier customers, access to almost 400 airport lounges worldwide.

To encourage existing and new members of its airlines' frequent flyer programmes to explore more of its unrivalled network, the alliance is currently offering a special bonus of up to 15,000 miles or points, redeemable throughout the oneworld network. To participate, you need to fly on three oneworld airlines, using eligible fares, between 1 October and 31 November. See oneworld.com for details.

Its eight airlines and their affiliates carried more than 220 million passengers last year on a combined fleet of almost 2,000 aircraft, earning revenues of some US$50 billion.

Business Traveller’s is the only travel survey conducted by a UK-based publication which is independent, authoritative and which complies with the rules laid out by the Market Research Society.
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Old September 26th, 2004, 02:04 AM   #129
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Plane truth about seats
Testing `air' beds is an awakening Airlines upgrade business seating


ANNE DIMON
SPECIAL TO THE STAR
Toronto Star, Sept. 23, 2004

Cathay Pacific's food service carts are still clinking by at 9 p.m., which for those on London time isn't a problem. But it's 3 a.m. at my destination and I should be sleeping.

I've been in transit for the last 43 hours during a world-wind tour on six airlines, through eight time zones and across four continents to sample business-class beds, the new soft sell being used to win the loyalty of frequent flyers.

Right now my body is en route to Hong Kong, but my internal clock is stuck in the twilight zone.

Shuttling back and forth between time zones can do that to you. But to subject yourself to the shuttle of your own free will? Yes, that is insane.

Altitude, different time zones, cramped quarters and travel stress are just a few of the reasons airline passengers find it hard to get shut-eye. So, who offers the best airborne bed? This body took flight to find out.

Flying Singapore to Johannesburg, I'm lying in one of the most comfortable sleeper seats in business class today and I can't sleep a wink. Singapore Airlines, which began its non-stop service from Singapore to New York on June 28, bills its Space Bed as "the biggest business-class bed in the sky" and at 69 cm across, it's certainly the widest.

This bed-hopping airborne marathon began several days ago with the launch of British Airways Club World Sleeper Service from Toronto to London. BA's signature flat beds are laid out in a somewhat busy arrangement with some facing the back of the plane, others facing the front. Folding fans offer privacy between paired seats.

In addition to a pre-boarding buffet, the new Sleeper Service also includes a light Nightcap menu, a self-serve galley for the midnight munchies, and a promise to keep announcements to a minimum.

Passenger Michele Sweeting, senior vice president of design and procurement for Four Seasons Hotels & Resorts says she likes the pre-boarding meal service.

"It's less disruptive and you can go right to sleep and not be bothered."

Tucking myself in, I notice that the pillow is larger and the blanket heavier than last time I flew BA's World Club.

The multi-functional seat is indeed comfortable but when lowered to its flat position, you feel somewhat cramped and there's no space to keep personal items handy. Several hours later I wake to the sounds of breakfast being served to the 13 out of 36 Sleeper Service passengers who requested it earlier in the flight. Like me, others just wanted to sleep through the whole thing and enjoy breakfast, a shower and complimentary neck and shoulder massage later in BA's Arrivals Lounge.

Following a 35-hour layover at Heathrow, Cathay Pacific's 11-hour flight to Hong Kong departs at 7 p.m. London time and my eyelids are so heavy I can barely read.

I rolled down the almost-flat seat with the push of a few buttons and tucked myself in. Pillows are about the same size as those on British Airways but more comfortable. Of course, pillows like beds (and airline seats that stretch into beds) are subject to individual preferences and Cathay has taken that into consideration — pillows are silk on one side, cotton on the other.

Cathay's newly launched long-haul business-class cabin includes features such as programmable mood lighting, noise reducing headphones and a bar area for mingling with other business-class passengers. I didn't get to mingle because I was too busy sleeping.

Multi-functional seats have lumbar support and aisle-seat armrests can be raised or lowered. Space for personal stuff even includes a little shelf for shoes. I finally did dose off and thanks to the shoulder screens I'm not accidentally flinging a wayward arm into a neighbour's lap. Somewhere over the Mozambique Channel, the aroma of a dim sum breakfast stirs me to wakefulness. Twelve hours after landing in Johannesburg, when I finally board one of SAA's new A340-300s bound for New York, via Dakar, I'm beginning to feel what Africaaners might call a little "moggy." The time zone shuffle can do that to a body.

I could have curled up in the airline's comfortable seat and slept for the entire 16-hour flight but to combat jetlag I put myself on destination time (3:15 p.m.) and keep myself awake until we are back in flight following a refuelling stop in Dakar.

Smuggling into the deployed seat, which rolls down to a lie-flat position, I discover a massage feature that feels like the chair is deep breathing. A cozy duvet, comfortable pillow and a flexible, personal reading lamp instead of the usual overhead reading light all add to the sleep environment. It's almost six hours later when I finally wake.

With only 18 seats in KLM's spacious business-class cabin, it looks more like First Class and that's because it once was. While the cabin affords travellers the most amount of personal space, seats are older, not as multi-featured as the other airlines, but when the body is this tired you could sleep standing up.

My seatmate who has been sleeping for the duration of the trip finally awakes and I take the opportunity to pepper him with questions. Raphael, a diplomat who travels two to three times a month, says he enjoyed about five hours sleep last night and he's planning to head straight to work from the airport. Newer sleeper-seats are now available on several KLM trans-Atlantic, Boeing 777 flights into Amsterdam.

Following the one-hour-and-15-minute flight from Amsterdam to Frankfurt, and another 11 hours at the Frankfurt International Airport, I have now boarded the final leg of this marathon.

While BA lays claim to having the first truly flat bed to fly, and Singapore Airlines offers the "biggest" bed, Lufthansa boasts the "longest bed in its class." stretching out to two metres. While that might seem sufficient long for the average traveller, "for me all beds are too short," says O.J. Krueck, a Frankfurt-based government consultant who travels extensively.

"I don't find too much difference in the seats, but the headrests on Lufthansa add to my comfort."

In addition to headrests, the seat offers six independently adjustable features including retractable armrests for more elbow room. I also liked the hand-held master control unit which meant I could manoeuvre the seat and control the entertainment system from any seat position. It's not a unique feature, but you can also save and recall your favourite seat position with the touch of a button. Each Private Bed has a table doubling as a privacy screen, but British Airways' folding fans still offer the most privacy.

The promotional material says the seat has about 100 positions but I didn't bother counting. I was too comfortable having an afternoon nap.

Following roughly 60 hours in mid-air and testing out almost as many seat/bed positions, I can absolutely conclude that there is no such thing as the definitive "best" business-class sleeper bed. While British Airways offers the most sleep-friendly environment, they are the only airline to offer an orchestrated "sleep service."

Personally I had the longest uninterrupted sleep on South African Airlines but it was also the longest flight and 90 per cent of the time we flew in darkness. Singapore Airlines has the widest bed but sleep was difficult for reasons that had nothing to do with comfort.

Conclusively, the ability to sleep in-flight depends on much more than seat comfort or how flat the bed lies. Time and duration of the flight, your own body clock, frame of mind, personal sleep patterns and individual preferences all impact heavily on sleep quality and quantity at 38,000 feet.


Anne Dimon is a Toronto-based freelance writer whose trip was subsidized by the airlines mentioned in this piece.
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Old September 26th, 2004, 10:43 PM   #130
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Source : pBase

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Old September 27th, 2004, 04:11 AM   #131
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Cathay @ Manchester Airport



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Old September 28th, 2004, 12:35 AM   #132
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Old September 28th, 2004, 07:38 PM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Cathay @ Manchester Airport
Is this one of the new cargo planes of Cathay??
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Old September 30th, 2004, 07:51 PM   #134
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^ All that the photographer has provided is that it is from Manchester this year and that it is a 'B- ME Cathay Pacific Cargo B747F'.
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Old September 30th, 2004, 08:08 PM   #135
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^ All that the photographer has provided is that it is from Manchester this year and that it is a 'B- ME Cathay Pacific Cargo B747F'.
I've never seen Cathay has a plain white cargo plane.
Cathay paints its cargo planes, too. So I was just wondering.
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Old October 2nd, 2004, 07:48 PM   #136
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Cost of Rolls Royce Engines
Rolls-Royce to power eight additional aircraft for Cathay Pacific

14 April 2004 - Corporate Press Release

Rolls-Royce announced today (14 April) that its engines would power an additional eight aircraft for Cathay Pacific Airways.

Cathay Pacific has announced plans to purchase two Trent 800 powered Boeing 777s and three Trent 700 powered Airbus A330s. Delivery of these aircraft is scheduled to begin in April 2005 and August 2006 respectively. The value of the engine business to Rolls-Royce is $120 million.
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Old October 3rd, 2004, 12:13 AM   #137
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Timetables



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Old October 3rd, 2004, 05:02 AM   #138
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07 September 2004
Cathay Pacific opens premium lounge at Heathrow’s Terminal 3

Cathay Pacific Airways today formally opened its new First & Business Class lounge at Heathrow’s Terminal 3 which offers spa-quality facilities to premium passengers and top-tier frequent flier club members departing on any of the airline’s three daily non-stop flights to Hong Kong.

Based upon the design concepts of UK architect John Pawson, who created “The Wing,” Cathay Pacific’s award-winning lounge at Hong Kong International Airport, the London lounge offers a clam, relaxing style and quality of service matched only by the airline’s service inflight.

Bespoke walnut, crystal and marble finishes lend five-star elegance to a space that is suited for both work and relaxation. Personal Living Spaces with state-of-the-art business facilities are complemented by fine leather seating, showers, a wide choice of Asian and Western dishes in special dining areas, fine wine and beverages and a dedicated team of knowledgeable lounge staff.

The lounge also includes the five-metre “Long Table,” an iconic feature of Cathay Pacific’s premium lounges across its network. Softly illuminated rice paper-lined glass “landscaped” walls containing washed river pebbles and bamboo plants provide a hint of natural Asia elegance to the lounge environment.

Cathay Pacific Director and Chief Operating Officer Philip Chen said: “With 21 non-stop flights to Hong Kong every week, London is our key destination in Europe and the gateway to seamless connections across our network to destinations throughout Asia and onwards to Australia. Our new lounge underscores our commitment to provide passengers with a level of service quality and consistency that’s unmatched by any other airline.”

Food and drink:
As well as European cuisine, a range of Asian dishes such as dim sum or noodles is also on offer. The choice is frequently varied to ensure that even the regular traveller has something new to look forward to. Also available is a range of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Information on passenger preferences comes from a number of different sources, and specifications will be adjusted from time to time based on comments from passengers and observations from Cathay Pacific staff. The aim is to provide passengers with an ongoing variety of food and to periodically revise the menu accordingly.

Work Areas:
The new lounge offers Business travellers state-of-the-art technology enabling them to remain plugged into the office, including broadband, modem and wireless access along with payphones. Passengers can choose to use their own technology in the relaxed comfort of the seating area or the state of the art Internet desktops. Entertainment options range from surfing the Internet and sampling the reading materials, to viewing plasma TV screens offering cable, digital and terrestrial channels.

A “Personal Living Space ” (PLS) offers a comfortable place to work, email, or surf the Internet on IBM Netvistor computers with flat screen 15 inch desktops. The eight PLS stations in Business Class offer a 1.65m workspace. The five stations in First Class boast a two metre workspace finished in rich dark timber, surrounded by leather clad panels. All workstations are illuminated with individual ‘Mistral’ desk lamps from Studio Italia. Ample laptop connections and power points are provided, as well as broadband wireless access. Etched glass screens provide privacy, and coat hooks at each PLS are a thoughtful touch.

Passenger Services:
Specially trained Cathay Pacific staff are on hand to assist passengers with ticketing or reservations queries, business facilities or Marco Polo Club services. Flight Information Display Screens are located in the lounge to keep passengers informed about any changes to their flight schedules.

DESIGN ELEMENTS:
Manager, Product Sarah Blomfield says, “Our intent was to impart a sense of tranquillity and uncluttered design, keeping it simple, somewhat muted, but cool and contemporary in colour palette. Only the finest quality materials were used to create a comfortable but distinctive environment. Much of the beauty of the lounge is in the detail.”

She continues, “We used clean lines and natural toned colours for furniture and finishes to make the most of the linear space and create a calm and contemporary environment. The guiding concept behind the design was to create an escape away from the noise and bustle normally experienced at an airport. The layout is based on the concept that different areas are destinations in themselves yet should flow naturally from one to another. Areas have been planned to maximise the use of space and to serve their functional purpose – whether working, watching television, relaxing or dining”.

Lighting:
Lighting has been designed with a mixture of down lights and compact fluorescents to provide directional ambient and wash lighting. The principle of having flexible, controllable lighting, with energy saving control systems has been employed throughout. Table lamps in First Class are by Louis Poulsen and in Business Class are Glashutte Limburg.

Furniture & Flooring:
Furniture in Business Class includes two types of single lounge seats, plus the Eames low back aluminium task chairs in black leather. Custom made leather topped cube stools are situated at the Long Table. Lounge seating is arranged in groupings in different areas, punctuated with elm cube corner tables, stone inlaid coffee tables and round coffee tables.

In First Class, there is more emphasis on sofa seating, with similar coffee and corner tables in the lounge areas. The PLS feature Eames low back Soft Pad group tsa chairs, upholstered in black leather.

For both Business Class and First Class, contemporary-design Axminster rugs from the world-renowned Tai Ping Carpet Company define the seat groups.

Toilets & Showers:
There are three shower units for use by both First and Business passengers. Finishes include Riverstone and slate in the shower areas, and an attendant is on hand to provide fresh towels and other amenities on demand.

The Future:
Cathay Pacific believes that passengers’ ever increasing expectations will always guide the development of lounge facilities, and keeping a close eye on their expectations and preferences is a key activity. Lounge facilities and the way in which the environment is controlled are likely to be driven by technological advances in the next few years - the advent of wireless access in lounges is a good example of how things have changed in just a couple of years. Changes in hospitality design and social trends will also obviously play a key role in the design of lounges for the future.


Notes to Editors
*Lounge Awards

August 2002, The Wing was named The World’s Best Airline Lounge.

2004 Skytrax survey voted Cathay Pacific’s lounges as the best in the world. Cathay also received top ratings for both Best First Class Lounge and Best Business Class Lounge in the same survey.

Cathay Pacific was named “Best of the Best” in the Top Service Award in a Next Magazine’s readers poll (one of Hong Kong’s most widely circulated weekly general interest magazines).

Cathay Pacific receives Top Service Gold Award – Next Magazine.

The Wing was also recently named first in a Forbes magazine list of The World’s Ten Best Airport Lounges.

**Lounge Entry Criteria:
First Class Lounge is open to the following:

First Class passengers of all oneworld alliance airlines

The Marco Polo Club Diamond Card members when travelling on Cathay Pacific flights

Cargo Clan Elite members

All Emerald status members of oneworld alliance airlines Frequent Flyer Programmes when the next onward flight is with a oneworld member airline.
Business Class Lounge is open to:

Business Class passengers of all oneworld alliance airlines.

The Marco Polo Club Diamond Card members when travelling with other carriers

The Marco Polo Club Gold and Silver Card members when travelling on Cathay Pacific flights

The Marco Polo Club Gold Card members when travelling Cathay long haul in any class into Hong Kong with same day connection to mainland China on any carrier

Cargo Clan Elite members

All Sapphire status members of oneworld alliance airlines Frequent Flyer Programmes when the next onward flight is with a oneworld members airline.
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Old October 4th, 2004, 12:36 AM   #139
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Want a plasma TV with your duty-free vodka, sir?

Simon Parry
3 October 2004
South China Morning Post

Hong Kong people used to be content to leave their passion for shopping behind for a couple of hours as they flew away on holiday.

But now they are getting down to some serious purchasing as soon as the seat-belt light goes out.

As well as the usual cartons of cigarettes and bottles of whisky, Cathay Pacific passengers are ordering everything from $5,000 home-theatre systems to $26,800 massage chairs and even $40,000 plasma-screen TVs as they cruise at 10,000 metres.

The big-ticket items, delivered to a passenger's home in time for the end of their holiday, have proved such a hit since their launch in July that tomorrow the airline will further expand the range of duty-free goods you could not possibly fit into your hand luggage.

The in-flight sales boom is boosting Cathay's revenue by $120 million a year and the number of items on sale in-flight has risen from 74 in 1994, with top prices of a few hundred dollars, to 174 today with a combined value of well over $100,000.

Cathay chief operating officer Philip Chen Nan-lok told airline employees at a recent briefing that spending on in-flight duty-free items was on a "steady upward trend" and was already bringing in more than $10 million a month.

The average passenger now spends $11 on duty-free purchases and Cathay aims to persuade its customers to part with even more money by increasing the selection and dishing out air miles with purchases from this month.

Special crews dedicated to in-flight sales are being introduced on shorter routes to South Korea and Taiwan to ensure that rushed cabin crew do not miss out on any orders, and a website is to be launched to let passengers browse through what is on offer before they fly.

Cathay Pacific declined requests for interviews about the expansion of its in-flight sales, but a marketing expert said the airline appeared to be following the lead of other carriers such as America's United Airlines by cashing in on a captive consumer base.

"The aim is to take advantage of impulse purchasing - and impulse purchasing is likely to go up after a couple of drinks," said Professor Gerald Gorn of the University of Science and Technology.

"The audience is literally captive on the plane. This should result in more exposure to catalogue items than under more normal circumstances."

The expansion of the range might affect duty-free sales at the airport, Professor Gorn said, but he pointed out: "Some of these larger items aren't available at the airport and not all passengers have enough time before their flight to do duty-free shopping.

"And in any case it wouldn't matter to the airline if it cannibalised duty-free sales at the airport. What they sell is putting money in their pockets."

The role model for Cathay's expansion may be United, which on its US domestic flights has an extensive sales catalogue featuring goods from different companies. There are phones on board for passengers to place free calls for home delivery.

Floran Lee, spokeswoman for short-haul specialist Dragonair, which has a $1,100 digital camera as its priciest electronic item for sale, said the airline was also expanding its range. This month it launched a separate in-flight magazine for duty-free sales.

"In keeping with market tastes, we are looking to expand the items available from traditional ones such as cosmetics and jewellery, to small electronic devices such as digital cameras, and health products such as calorie-burning monitors and pedometers," she said.
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Old October 6th, 2004, 05:03 AM   #140
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Copyright 2004 South China Morning Post Ltd.
October 5, 2004

Air miles ahead in customer care Cathay Pacific has designed a system to link all aspects of communication
Danyll Wills

Ever had this happen to you when dealing with customer service? You give your name, define the problem and then get passed on to someone else. You start all over.

Maybe you have e-mailed customer service, but when you call no one seems to have read your e-mail.

This may be unpleasant when dealing with a phone company, but is completely unacceptable if you are about to get on a plane.

"We try to present a single view to the customer. We do not want people constantly reintroducing themselves all the time. Recognition and differentiation are very important," Cathay Pacific Airways general manager of loyalty programmes Dominic Purvis said.

At Hong Kong's flagship carrier, customer inquiries - whether a fax, phone call or e-mail - are handled with a "unified messaging system" and consolidated into one customer profile.

Every time a passenger comes into contact with Cathay, the customer service representative is already clued in.

It is just one way the company is using technology to better serve customers. "A full suite for us cannot be just telephones. There are four major touch points for us: reservation, check-in, in-flight service and loyalty services," Mr Purvis said.

"Many of our interactions take place in different ways: face to face, telephone, Web, e-mail or SMS."

To Mr Purvis, it is not technology that is important, but how technology is deployed to better serve passengers.

"Managing our relationship with our customers does not require technology. We have tried to interact with our customers for more than 30 years with programmes such as Asia Miles and the Marco Polo Club for example, and we find it is our people who make the difference," he said.

Cathay has a database of about 2.3 million people who fly with the airline on a regular basis. It contains answers to questions such as how customers prefer to be contacted, where they live and what language they use.

But the airline is careful not to intrude on privacy.

"All these are questions we need to know the answers to but we must be extremely careful about how we get this information and how we use it," Mr Purvis said.

It may be that Chloe Jones was born in Beijing and prefers to speak Putonghua, while her British husband prefers English. If the flight attendants know this, they can better serve them. But if they congratulate Mr Jones on his daughter's recent graduation, he may not be too happy that a complete stranger has that kind of knowledge about his personal life.

Anna Or, head of Cathay's customer relationship management programme, said the airline had begun looking at data mining, data warehousing and other forms of analysing data on customers in 1996.

But it was difficult finding any software or solution that fitted its needs. Most of the large vendors were targeting their software at telecommunications companies and financial institutions.

Cathay decided to build its own solution. "In 1996, we wanted to make use of the information we had on our customers. In particular, we introduced more targeted marketing and improved our service. We were able to do this because we based it on the customer's preferences and history with the company," Ms Or said.

By 2001, however, the technology had changed.

"We started looking at who is using what. We looked at Oracle, PeopleSoft and many of the other big names. They were targeting telecoms, financial institutions, but there was nothing for airlines. Many of them said things like: 'It's a full suite' and the like. But it really wasn't," she said.

A telecommunications company, for example, knows its customers are going to call for some kind of help, but they will be relatively stationary.

For Cathay, the customer by definition is on the move. Few vendors had solutions which recognised this aspect of the airline's business.

Cathay has the manpower and resources to build its own systems and it does so with the help of others, such as IBM's Global Services Organisation. Nevertheless, it is a complex process and requires everybody - from top management to partners - to understand the issues.

Mr Purvis did not see an easy solution in sight.

"The legacy systems we - and everybody else - have put in place do not put the customer first," Mr Purvis said.

"Before deciding to invest in new technology, it was vital to re-examine the way we interact with our customers.

"Part of the technology review we did was to look at what exists and what should exist."

Ms Or said that the vendors were beginning to change a little.

"We are seeing some signs that the vendors are looking at the airlines," she said.
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