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Old June 4th, 2009, 08:44 AM   #1401
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Cathay Pacific CEO says cargo business stabilising

SINGAPORE, June 4 (Reuters) - Cathay Pacific Airways CEO Tony Tyler said on Thursday the airline's cargo business is stabilising, and it did not expect to encounter difficulty financing its aircraft orders.

"On the cargo side, things have stopped getting worse," he said at luncheon hosted by UBS in Singapore.

"We don't see a problem financing airplane orders," he added.

Tyler also reiterated that Cathay, Hong Kong's dominant airline, had no plans to do a rights issue to raise cash.
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Old June 4th, 2009, 11:16 AM   #1402
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國泰機票劈價逾半
3 June 2009
星島日報

金融海嘯令本港航運業的客貨運受到嚴重打擊。其中國泰航空五月份客貨運未見好轉,乘客量按年下跌百分之八,貨運量亦跌一成三,頭等及商務客量更急跌四成。部分前往新加坡、中國大陸,以及美加等地的機票,更須「劈價」一半吸客。而二至四月的貨運量,亦按年暴跌近兩成,但較一月兩成八的跌幅,已穩定下來,惟業界對前景未感樂觀。

中文大學航空政策研究中心昨舉行研討會,探討「經濟衰退對航運業帶來的挑戰」。國泰航空國際事務部經理劉穎連表示,五月客貨運表現未見好轉,期內客運量按年下跌百分之八,貨運量則跌一成三。

她指,近期油價再度攀升,增加航空業成本,反觀航運需求則持續下跌,頭等及商務客源更下跌三至四成,為了刺激客量,國泰亦跟隨同業調低票價,單以經濟客位為例,飛往新加坡或內地的機票,由以往的二、三千元,一度減至只需一千元;飛往美加的機票,以往每張要逾萬元,亦減至三、四千元,減幅超過一半。但她相信,再度「劈價」的機會很微。

機場貨運量跌約兩成

劉穎連對下半年業務表現,持審慎態度,但期望七至八月會好轉,但受到人類豬流感、油價等因素影響,前景仍難以預測。

貨運方面,亞洲空運中心策劃及服務科總經理李耀榮表示,本港機場處理的貨運量,去年十二月及今年一月,跌幅驚人,高達兩成八,但今年二至四月,跌幅已見穩定,但跌幅仍有逾一成九,但他指,暫難評估是否已到谷底,或經濟是否復甦。 記者 馬國揚
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Old June 5th, 2009, 10:56 AM   #1403
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Cathay Pacific Chief Executive says governments and regulators add burden to industry already in crisis
4 June 2009
Press Release

Cathay Pacific Airways Chief Executive Tony Tyler today said that governments and regulators are working to make life more complicated for an aviation industry that’s already reeling from one of the deepest and most-sustained business downturns in recent years. Speaking at the Asian Transport Luncheon Conference, organised by UBS in Singapore, Mr Tyler said the industry is an anachronism in the way it’s regulated, is scarred by inefficiencies and anomalies, and dogged by government interference.

“Historically the industry has been viewed by governments and regulators as a cash cow. But in the last 60 years, airlines generated US$32 billion in profit and US$11 trillion in revenues for an average margin of just over 0.3 per cent. Even at the peak of the cycle, margins were less than 3 per cent – some cash cow!” Mr Tyler said.

“Regulators and governments and stakeholders like airports don’t make it easy to improve on that. When they met in Brussels recently the Association of European Airlines branded regulation on the industry ‘unacceptably burdensome’ and that much of it was ‘costly and needless’. I couldn’t agree more – and it’s never more apparent than when the industry is wracked by crisis, as at present.”

Citing various examples of the way governments and regulators are making life unacceptably burdensome for the industry, Mr Tyler said that in Canada, parliamentary opposition is trying to push a bill through Federal Parliament in Ottawa that will provide passengers for compensation when a flight has been delayed or cancelled, when boarding has been denied and when an aircraft has remained on the ground for more than one hour.

“We have no problem with laws protecting passengers’ rights, but they must be fair and realistic, and should be drawn up in consultation with the stakeholders affected - such as airlines. In this case, there was no such consultation and some provisions of the proposed legislation just do not make sense. For example, for the issue of delays, it’s simply not realistic to ignore factors such as weather, air traffic control and airport congestion and lay the financial responsibility solely with airlines.”

Mr Tyler also referred to recently circulated US Government instructions and guidance to airlines on how to implement its revised regulations on the treatment of passengers with disabilities by airlines in both the US and overseas.

“There are 177 pages of guidance notes. Just think of the amount of communication and training for Cathay Pacific staff around the world that this requires. Rest assured if we get it wrong we’ll suffer from penalties and/or lawsuits,” Mr Tyler said. “The US objects to including airlines in the European Emissions Trading Scheme because of its extra-territorial application – and I agree. But what about the extra-territoriality of their own regulations?

“Some of the things we have to do are simply unrealistic. For instance, if a visually impaired person can’t read our website, so phones us instead, whoever answers the phone has to be able to give full and detailed information on every fare on our website. Just think for a moment about how practical that is going to be.

“And some of the 177 pages refer to rules about carrying service animals in the cabin. At least foreign carriers only have to carry dogs as ‘service animals’ - US carriers will also have to carry miniature horses or monkeys if the passenger needs them – even if only for psychiatric or emotional support.”

Mr Tyler pointed to other anomalies faced by the industry, including the way the UK Government has used the environment to excuse or justify massive increases in its air passenger duty (APD) beginning November this year. He also expressed disappointment with the way authorities in the US and EU are dragging their feet over a bid from three of Cathay Pacific’s oneworld partners – American Airlines, British Airways and Iberia - for worldwide antitrust immunity.

“We live in a world where politicians and bureaucrats sing the praises of competition.Yet some of their actions speak louder than words,” Mr Tyler said. “Rival global air alliances SkyTeam and Star Alliance have already enjoyed transatlantic antitrust immunity for some years, putting our oneworld alliance at a distinct disadvantage.

“If the oneworld carriers receive their clearance – as they should – it will mean stronger inter-alliance competition, more choice, more services and more benefits for customers. It’s completely illogical and unreasonable that they shouldn’t operate on the same playing field.”
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Old June 5th, 2009, 08:22 PM   #1404
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A world war II mateship, a visit to a Manila pub, a few beers later and Cathay Pacific hits the air
6 June 2009
The Northern Star

One of the world's best-known airlines has grown despite a turbulent history

Asia

THE first thing most would-be company owners do when musing over what to call their new outfit is to bring in the big guns of marketing, advertising, logo design and corporate law.

But back in 1946, two blokes who were to create what would become one of the world’s most successful airlines, had no interest in such normal business practicalities. Instead, one simply went to a Manila pub to get inspiration there, telling some foreign correspondent mates he drank with when visiting the Philippines that he wanted a name for an airline he was planning with a business partner in Hong Kong.

Over a philosophical glass or eight, the wordsmiths came up with Cathay Pacific –“Cathay” being the historic name for China, and “Pacific” because the partners wanted to one day fly to Australia.

And so an airline was born. Its owners, Roy Farrell, an American, and Sydney de Kantzow, an Australian, had known each other from their Second World War flying days in Asia. Each had a vision for an airline linking China, Asia and Australia.

In September 1946 they launched Cathay Pacific with a cheap surplus US Air Force Douglas DC-3 they dubbed ‘Betsy’.

It was an instant success, and an import-export company they set up to generate airfreight business equally so – particularly de Kantzow’s idea to fly fresh Sydney rock oysters to Hong Kong for luxury-strapped British expats.

To meet demand for seats and airfreight, the partners bought a second DC-3 within a few months, five more the following year and two Catalina flying boats to operate to the Portuguese colony of Macau off the coast of China. In their first six months they carried 3000 passengers and 15,000 kilograms of cargo between Asia and Australia alone.

But like most airlines, turbulence lay in wait for the fledgling Cathay Pacific and, in 1948, the British Governor of colonial Hong Kong dropped the bombshell that as ‘foreigners’ the partners could in fact not own more than 20 per cent of their own airline. They would need a British partner who would relieve them of 80 per cent.

John ‘Jock’ Swire, head of prominent Hong Kong trading company Butterfield and Swire, liked the idea, invested the required 80 per cent and assumed an active role in Cathay Pacific’s day-to-day operations.

Then in 1948, Cathay made unwanted history when the Catalina flying to Macau became the world’s first victim of air piracy: a group of Chinese gunmen hijacked the plane inflight, mistakenly believing there was a cargo of gold aboard. They shot the pilot and the plane crashed into China’s Pearl River estuary.

The only survivor of the 23 passengers and three crew was one of the hijackers, Wong Yu-man, who was held for three years but never charged as neither Portuguese Macau nor British Hong Kong had laws covering air piracy. On release from prison in 1951 Wong died in China in what one newspaper dryly observed ‘appeared a suitably contrived accident’.

As a result of the hijacking, Cathay Pacific became the world’s first airline to screen passengers and freight with metal detectors.

Another incident in 1972 once again focused world attention on Cathay Pacific. After one of its jet-engined Convairs crashed in Vietnam, Hong Kong police charged a Thai police officer with sabotage and murder, alleging he’d put a bomb in the bag of his wife whom he had insured heavily before putting her aboard with their child.

He was acquitted and no one else was ever charged.

Today Cathay Pacific Airways operates 97 passenger aircraft and 24 freighters to 120 destinations worldwide, employs 18,800 staff globally and carries about a million passengers a month.

Pretty good results from a beer in a bar, and one old DC-3 – which, incidentally, is on display at Hong Kong’s Science Museum having been sold by Cathay in 1955 and bought back 30 years later after being found still flying freight around the Australian Outback.
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Old June 5th, 2009, 10:46 PM   #1405
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Visit Hong Kong Now with Cathay Pacific for 10,600 baht

Cathay Pacific Airways introduces a brand new package, Visit Hong Kong Now Summer 2009. It’s an invitation to Hong Kong to enjoy shopping and exploring the exciting dining out opportunities offered by Hong Kong’s glamorous restaurant scene. The special package is available from now until 10 September 2009.

With a starting price of 10,600 baht, the Visit Hong Kong Now Summer 2009 package includes an economy class Bangkok-Hong Kong -Bangkok round trip ticket with Cathay Pacific, or Phuket-Hong Kong-Phuket with Dragonair, Hong Kong security charge and 3 days 2 nights’ hotel accommodation.And you can choose one of the following privilege offers:


1. Free seat-in-coach return airport-hotel option
2. Free return airport-hotel option by airport express link (AEL), available for hotels that provide AEL shuttle bus service only
3. One-day Ocean Park tour
4. 45 -minute Aqua Luna harbour cruise

For passengers wishing to stay at the five-star Peninsula Hong Kong Hotel, there is a special offer package price starting at 21,100 baht.

There is a special reduction of 2,000 baht exclusively for Visa Platinum card holders, if they book the package at Cathay Pacific Airways office from 1 June until 31 August 2009.
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Old June 6th, 2009, 07:47 AM   #1406
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By billmf from a Hong Kong discussion forum :



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Old June 8th, 2009, 11:46 AM   #1407
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Cathay seeks further delays in new plane deliveries -CEO

KUALA LUMPUR, June 8 (Reuters) - Cathay Pacific (0293.HK) said on Monday that it is seeking further deferrals on new aircraft orders amid a downturn in the airline industry. "We have already delayed some of our deliveries" said CEO Tony Tyler on the sidelines of an airline meeting in Kuala Lumpur, adding that the airline was in talks with "both manufacturers" about further delays.

Cathay has about $10.66 billion of new plane orders with European aircraft manufacturer Airbus (EAD.PA) and Boeing (BA.N).

Tyler said Cathay had no plans to further reduce capacity after making reductions earlier this year, and saw no signs of recovery in the business. (Reporting by Sara Webb; Editing by Christina Pantin)
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Old June 8th, 2009, 05:01 PM   #1408
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Cathay Pacific CEO: No Plans To Reduce Capacity Further
7 June 2009

KUALA LUMPUR (Dow Jones)--Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. (0293.HK) has no plans to cut more capacity, Chief Executive Tony Tyler said Monday, adding that the recent rise in fuel oil prices posed a new threat to the industry.

"It is a worry. The last thing we need when revenues are weak is the rising fuel prices," Tyler told reporters on the sidelines of the International Air Transport Association conference.

He said the airline had already announced significant capacity reduction in April and there are no plans to cut capacity further.

He, however said that some routes in the Middle East and Australia were "holding up well," but warned that the H1N1 influenza will have an impact on some of the routes, like Australia.
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Old June 9th, 2009, 04:45 PM   #1409
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Airline in cello row called insensitive to the arts
9 June 2009
South China Morning Post

An airline owned by one of Hong Kong's major corporate arts sponsors has been accused of insensitivity to the arts for trying to stop a renowned cellist from taking her instrument on an aircraft with her even though she had bought a seat for it.

Dragonair ground staff told Canadian Amanda Forsyth, principal cello with the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa, that she had to check in her treasured but bulky instrument as though it were a suitcase.

Forsyth argued with the staff for 40 minutes until a senior manager was brought in and she was able to take the cello aboard for a flight from Hong Kong to Shanghai.

Dragonair is a wholly owned subsidiary of Cathay Pacific, in turn a subsidiary of the Swire Group, which is principal patron of the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra in a three-year, HK$36 million sponsorship deal. Cathay Pacific is the official carrier for the Asian Youth Orchestra.

Musicians with bulky instruments commonly pay for a seat into which the instrument is strapped alongside the owner.

Dragonair staff told Forsyth she could not take hers into the cabin because the airline had not been advised in advance of the cello's dimensions. She came to the city last month to perform with her husband, violinist and conductor Pinchas Zukermen, and the Hong Kong Sinfonietta on May 22, then went to Shanghai for another concert.

She had earlier flown United Airlines from Canada with no problems.

The airline said individual travellers who wanted to carry bulky baggage such as a cello were required to make a request at least three working days before the travel date with specific information on weight and dimensions, and to book an extra seat.

But Hong Kong Sinfonietta general manager Lee Ho-yee said cellos were a "fairly standard size", with the only variations being the case size.

"Regardless of the measurement information, the airline was already informed that there would be a cello on board that plane."

She said that the ground staff had trouble making the decision and asked the couple to take another flight, but they rejected that suggestion as they were on tour and could not afford to lose the time.

It took more than 40 minutes for the ground staff to reach a senior manager who was able to allow Forsyth's cello on board, Ms Lee said.

"We understand that Forsyth was furious at this. This is such a shame for Hong Kong. They are very famous musicians, and anything could easily make international headlines. If our society does not have an understanding with, and supports the arts, how can you talk about building the West Kowloon Cultural District?"

Ms Lee said stringed instruments were particularly fragile. "If it's an antique one from the 17th or 18th century, it can easily cost over a million. But money is just one issue. It's not easy for a musician to find the right instrument. That's why musicians want to keep their instruments close to them and they will be heartbroken if anything bad happens to them."

She said the Sinfonietta had had no bad experiences with foreign airlines but there had been problems before with Dragonair. In 2007, when the troupe took the airline to Shanghai, the cellos were allowed on board only after one of the orchestra's board members talked to senior management of Cathay Pacific.

"But the crew argued with us for a long time on how to sit the cellos," she said. Musicians were upset by how airlines treated their instruments, insisting they be wrapped in blue bags like dead bodies. "They said [Cathay Pacific] had 'mummified' their cellos," Ms Lee said.

She said the Sinfonietta would only use foreign airlines this year.
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Old June 11th, 2009, 08:07 AM   #1410
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Cathay offsets oil rise with lower hedging loss
10 June 2009
South China Morning Post

Cathay Pacific Airways, the biggest Hong Kong-based carrier, was feeling less pain from rising oil prices, as the increases could be partially offset by a smaller fuel hedging loss, said chief executive Tony Tyler.

"As to the pricing range of the oil prices, we are not feeling badly at the moment. But if it continues to rise, we will start feeling the pain," Mr Tyler said on the sidelines of the International Air Transport Association (Iata) meeting in Kuala Lumpur yesterday. "The rise in oil price has been less negative to Cathay, as the unrealised fuel hedging loss is less."

Mr Tyler added that Cathay had sold put options on oil futures at US$70 to US$80 per barrel. Oil prices have gained more than 50 per cent this year and hit a seven-month high of US$70.32 per barrel last week.

Contracts for delivery next month were trading at about US$70 in New York and London yesterday.

Cathay lost HK1.9 billion in cash for the settlement of fuel hedging contracts in the first two months after booking HK$6.7 billion in unrealised hedging losses last year.

The company disclosed last month that it would change its fuel hedging method by gradually buying futures contracts directly from the market instead of engaging in "three-way hedging", buying and selling options on oil prices.

In the long run, Cathay would prefer a low-oil-price operating environment, as the cost for the unhedged part of oil consumption would be smaller, Mr Tyler said.

Commenting on the second half, Mr Tyler said demand was still very weak and he did not see any improvement in the cargo division.

"Perhaps it has stopped getting worse, but we haven't seen it getting better," he said, adding that there were perhaps signs of a bottoming out, "but we have to wait and see if that's the case."

Mr Tyler said Cathay could initially benefit from the potential tie-up between China Eastern Airlines Corp and Shanghai Airlines. Cathay runs more than 13 daily flights between Hong Kong and Shanghai.

"These two airlines are competing aggressively on the Shanghai-Hong Kong route. If they could be consolidated, the competition would be less intense," he said.

However, the tie-up would create a stronger rival in Shanghai, as their combined market share would reach 50 per cent, Mr Tyler said. "Cathay has been in some 60-something years of the toughest competition in the world {hellip} We are not afraid of any kind of competition."

As the first executive from a Hong Kong carrier to become the chairman of Iata in its 65 years, Mr Tyler said the most urgent task for him was to develop a carbon emission regime in Iata for the Copenhagen conference in six months. "It is so important to the airlines, as the conference will make the decision on how the airlines should take part in the reduction of carbon emission."

Cathay has launched a carbon offset programme for its passengers to use their mileage points to pay for the carbon emissions during their flight.
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Old June 11th, 2009, 09:10 AM   #1411
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Daydreaming isn't always a waste of time: aviation enthusiast James Lee Shing-hin was losing track of what his professor was saying when a novel idea struck him. That idea led to an award-winning design to cure a common, in-flight annoyance
11 June 2009
South China Morning Post

Two-and-a-half years ago, James Lee was in the middle of a popular lecture where students filled every seat and fought their way to put their hands on armrests. It puzzled him that despite the competition, everyone managed to rest their arms somewhere.

The student - who aspired to working in the aviation industry and is now a Cathay Pacific management trainee - instantly related the situation to an economy-class plane trip.

"When one person is using an armrest, the one sitting next to him wouldn't be able to use it. But he may not feel at ease to speak up."

An armrest that allows two people to place their arms on it simultaneously would solve the problem, he thought. And it was such a design that made him shine at the Crystal Cabin Award 2009, an international award in aircraft interior innovation.

Mr Lee's "Paperclip" Armrest Concept won him the Judges' Commendation Prize among competitors from 14 countries. As one can imagine with its name, the armrest is a bent double-level design that looks a bit like a paper-clip.

"The key to it is to preserve some space between the upper level of the armrest and the seat."

Why name the design a paper-clip? Mr Lee said it's something more than its shape. "A paper-clip is cheap but very useful {hellip} the armrest is low-tech and simple, but it can be very useful and installed in many settings, too."

On the day of the interview, Mr Lee and the reporter gave the armrest a try. It was set in between two office chairs and it worked well. Enough space for two, no fights required on flights nor in office - although it could get a bit too relaxing during office meetings.

There is no doubt that the 25-year-old loves aircraft. As to why he loves them, he offered a phrase commonly used to describe feelings of attraction between people: "When you love something it's not exactly a rational decision. It's a feeling."

His fascination for aviation began during his childhood. "I started loving it when I was four or five." The collector goes for aircraft models and aviation magazines. He became the president of the Aviation Club in secondary school, studied mechanical engineering at the University of Hong Kong, and pursued an aeronautics and astronautics master degree in Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Four of the 12 astronauts who walked on the moon during the Apollo programme were MIT alumni, but Mr Lee was unmoved by the university's space-race connections.

In his earlier studies in Hong Kong, he achieved good academic results and became one of the first batch of secondary-form-six students admitted by a university through the Early Admission Scheme. His father is a doctor, and naturally people around him looked forward to him pursuing his father's profession.

"I'm interested in biology. But I'm passionate for aviation," he explained. Passion was an important drive for one to try his best in his career, he thought.

That was why he gave up popular subjects such as law and medicine, which many others prefer. "Now I am working extra hard to do my best. To show I haven't chosen a wrong path."

Hong Kong is a materialistic world where many choose income over interest, to which he said: "Many students choose certain subjects because of their prestige or for securing a good job. Or they choose a programme that only ones with many As [in public examinations] can enter. It is very bad if they choose something they are not interested in."

Following your interests could have far-reaching consequences, he said. "Only when you like your career can you develop passion and creativity for it. Only then can a society utilise all your talents," he said.
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Old June 13th, 2009, 09:44 AM   #1412
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Win a Trip to Bali From Cathay Pacific and the Four Seasons Resort

SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Enter for your chance to win a pair of roundtrip economy class tickets to the exotic island of Bali and indulge in ultimate luxury with a three-night hotel stay at the Four Seasons Resort and a massage package for two.

Allow yourself to be pampered by Cathay Pacific and the Four Seasons Resort as you prepare to experience the diversity and culture of Bali. Begin the journey in Cathay Pacific’s revolutionary economy class seats which features fixed-shell seating allowing passengers to recline but not intrude into the person seated behind. Watch the latest films with an enhanced entertainment system on a personal television and enjoy a fine selection of international cuisine. Upon arrival in Bali, stay at the elegant Four Seasons Resort where a private villa with breathtaking views and a rejuvenating massage awaits. Enter for your chance to win at www.cathaypacific.com/us.*

For the ones who can’t wait for the results of the sweepstakes, the June Deal of the Month features roundtrip economy class air transportation to Bali from San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York (JFK) starting at a low fare of $1,041.

The Deal of the Month is a limited time offer and available online at www.cathaypacific.com/us. Valid for purchase by June 30 (or until deemed sold out) and depart for travel between Sep 1 through Nov 30. Fare is only eligible for Asia Miles. No minimum stay required although passenger may only stay a maximum of 30 days. Fares are non-reroutable, non-refundable and non-endorsable. Change fees apply. Additional rules and restrictions may apply. *No purchase necessary. Visit the website for complete sweepstakes terms and conditions.

About Cathay Pacific Airways

Headquartered in Hong Kong, Cathay Pacific Airways was named "Airline of the Year 2009" by the Skytrax World Airline Awards. From North America, Cathay Pacific offers daily nonstop service to Hong Kong from Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Toronto and Vancouver. The airline is a member of the oneworld™ alliance and a partner in Asia Miles, a leading Travel Reward program. For more information, visit: www.cathaypacific.com/us.
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Old June 13th, 2009, 09:45 AM   #1413
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Cathay Pacific May Passengers Down 7.5% On Year To 1.95 Mln

HONG KONG (Dow Jones)--Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. (0293.HK) said Thursday it carried 7.5% fewer passengers in May than it did a year earlier because of the swine flu outbreak and continued weakness in demand for business travel.

The Hong Kong-based airline and its China-focused unit, Hong Kong Dragon Airlines Ltd., carried 1.95 million passengers for the month. Its passenger load factor - or the proportion of seats filled on its flights - fell 1.6 percentage points to 75.8%.

Meanwhile, Cathay Pacific's cargo tonnage registered another month of double-digit decline, with shipments of 121,966 metric tons in May, down 13.3% from a year earlier.

The airline didn't provide year-earlier figures.

For the month, Cathay Pacific's passenger revenue, as measured in revenue passenger kilometers, fell 6.7% to 7.09 billion RPKs, while passenger capacity, as measured in available seat kilometers, fell 4.7% to 9.35 billion ASKs.
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Old June 14th, 2009, 01:55 PM   #1414
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Met the marketing head for Pakistan. She told me that their loads from KHI (and also rest of Pakistan) are anywhere from 70-100%, so I'm guessing an average of around 80%. Cathay's adding capacity to KHI by converting 2 of their (4) weekly A330s to regional 777's. Similar to the ones that go to DXB, meaning no sexy sliding seats.
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Old June 14th, 2009, 06:53 PM   #1415
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Dragonair to launch flights between Hong Kong, Guangzhou in September

HONG KONG, June 11 (Xinhua) -- Hong Kong-based Dragonair said it planned to launch flights between Guangzhou and Hong Kong on September 14, hoping to offer improved connectivity in and out of the Pear River Delta region, a manufacturing hub.

The twice daily service will depart from Hong Kong at 8:35 a.m. and 20:40 p.m., respectively. The flying time will be 50 minutes, Dragonair said Thursday.

The flights from Guangzhou to Hong Kong will depart each day at 10:15 a.m. and 22:25 p.m., respectively. The flying time will be one hour.

The service will be provided using Airbus A320 and A321.

Dragonair planned to launch the new service because air-to-air connections were still by far the most convenient way for international travelers to move in and out of the affluent and economically dynamic Pearl River Delta region, said Dragonair Chief Executive Officer Kenny Tang.

Subject to approval by authorities, sister airline Cathay Pacific will codeshare on the service to provide even more convenience for international travelers, he added.

A member of the Cathay Pacific Group, Dragonair is an affiliate member of Oneworld. It now operates a fleet of 30 passenger aircraft serving 29 regional destinations, including 17 cities on the Chinese mainland.
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Old June 14th, 2009, 08:50 PM   #1416
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An hour! It's only 110km in straight line. Probably half the travel time are circulations in departing and approaching at HKIA and GZ.
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Old June 15th, 2009, 05:10 AM   #1417
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
An hour! It's only 110km in straight line. Probably half the travel time are circulations in departing and approaching at HKIA and GZ.
Yes - I wonder what's the 'cruising altitude' for this route.

But I think this is more a competition measure against China Southern, who may be trying to funnel some of Hong Kong's traffic through Guangzhou. At this point this is not likely going to be a serious competitive threat for international passengers - China Southern has limited international connectivity. But instead of having Cathay's premium international passengers fly Star Alliance into Beijing and have them transfer domestic there, at least now they can fly to Hong Kong and transfer onto a Guangzhou flight under the same roof.
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Old June 15th, 2009, 04:48 PM   #1418
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Yes - I wonder what's the 'cruising altitude' for this route.

But I think this is more a competition measure against China Southern, who may be trying to funnel some of Hong Kong's traffic through Guangzhou. At this point this is not likely going to be a serious competitive threat for international passengers - China Southern has limited international connectivity. But instead of having Cathay's premium international passengers fly Star Alliance into Beijing and have them transfer domestic there, at least now they can fly to Hong Kong and transfer onto a Guangzhou flight under the same roof.
I would imagine it has to reach to normal cruise altitude before flying north over Macao/SZ/ZH airspace, then it soon flies into the GZ's approach and descend.

And I see the same thing, it is more a international transfer flight for travellers between GZ and rest of the world. It's absolutely pointless to fly between only the two cities, unless you have nothing better to do with plenty of cash. It easily take four hours total journey time for going to the airport, check-in 45 minutes in advance, flight time, and travel to the city from the airport. It takes only 2 hours by trains, and 3 by buses from city centre to city centre.
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Old June 16th, 2009, 03:50 PM   #1419
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Cargo hold of issues for Iata's new pilot Tony Tyler faces tough job as airline group's chief
16 June 2009
South China Morning Post

To celebrate his becoming chairman of the global airline club last week, Cathay Pacific Airways chief executive Tony Tyler set out not so much a stall but a whole department store of complaints about the problems that the aviation industry faces.

It was a typically Tyler feisty effort, full of rambling good sense along with a few self-serving comments on behalf of airlines.

His speech, in Singapore just before he took up the post of chairman of the International Air Transport Association, deserves a wider audience. Does it offer hope that he may use his year in office to try to bring the airlines together to do something practical to improve the sickly business?

With the world's airlines facing losses of US$9 billion this year, some of Mr Tyler's home truths are telling, particularly his attack on stifling, greedy, often nonsensical government regulations.

Mr Tyler's biggest immediate test is whether he can persuade airlines and governments to come on board with a sensible scheme to make aviation pay for its greenhouse gas emissions. Major airlines such as Cathay and British Airways are pressing for a workable global greenhouse gas tax.

Admittedly, they are partly motivated by fear that unless they can get agreement, individual governments will impose more expensive piecemeal taxes. The European Union is showing the way, with planned taxes that will hit non-European airlines such as Cathay heavily.

Poorer countries are pressing to raise US$10 billion from a tax on long-haul flights. Britain is imposing heavy taxes on all flights, but the money goes to general revenue, not to protect the environment, "a Brown tax, not a green one", Mr Tyler mocked.

Willie Walsh, chief executive of British Airways, conceded that the airlines had spent too much time with transport ministers and within the International Civil Aviation Organisation, a United Nations body, rather than talking to environment ministers. A lot is expected of Mr Tyler, not least because he is based in Hong Kong, and China, along with Brazil and India, has been showing its new political and economic clout.

But there are really too many issues calling for his attention. One is to lobby the European Union to stop delaying and accomplish the Single European Sky, bringing together all the air traffic systems. This would save airlines 12 per cent in fuel costs and the choking planet an equivalent amount of greenhouse gases.

Then there is an ever-growing plethora of rules and regulations. The United States, Mr Tyler noted, had just issued 177 pages of guidance notes on dealing with passengers with disabilities. Foreign airlines only have to carry dogs as service animals in the cabin for disabled passengers, but US airlines must be prepared to carry miniature horses, monkeys or even ducks if passengers need them for psychiatric or emotional support.

Some countries are planning to fine airlines or demand compensation for passengers in the case of delays, and Mr Tyler protested that this was hardly fair if weather, such as typhoons in Hong Kong or snowstorms in New York, was responsible.

But one of the reasons why demands for compensation have been made is that airlines treat passengers cavalierly. I was once stuck on board a United Airlines flight for almost nine hours before the flight was cancelled, without compensation.

Mr Tyler claimed that wider recognition for the oneworld alliance would give passengers the greater competition of three alliances to choose from. But how is three a better choice than 10 or 20?

Airlines have colluded with governments in setting base fares at unrealistically high prices. Only fools and business executives on expenses pay them. But they are a useful base for excess luggage or for imposing a whole range of extra charges and impositions on special fares. These have led to a baffling range of booking classes from A to Z for the three (or four, if there is premium economy) real classes of service on board.

Yes, Mr Tyler is right that airlines face tough times, especially with oil prices rising again. But honesty should require him to face up to the airlines' warts as well as those of governments and regulators.
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Old June 19th, 2009, 03:23 PM   #1420
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Cathay Pacific USA Flights Provide Convenient Connections to Dragonair’s New Twice Daily Guangzhou Service


Hong Kong Enhances Status as Premier Guangzhou/Pearl River Delta Gateway

SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Beginning September 14, 2009, North American passengers traveling to Guangzhou will be able to make the entire journey by air thanks to new service being launched by Cathay Pacific’s sister airline, Dragonair.

Cathay Pacific’s flights from the United States will provide easy connections to the new Dragonair flights via its hub at Hong Kong International Airport.

“The Pearl River Delta – and Guangzhou in particular – continues to be an increasingly important destination for North American businesspeople,” said Dennis Owen, Cathay Pacific’s vice president – Marketing, Americas. “With our sister airline, Dragonair, soon offering twice daily service to Guangzhou, our passengers will be able to connect directly to the Pearl River Delta by air.”

Part of the Cathay Pacific Group, Dragonair will operate the new services to Guangzhou (airport code CAN) using Airbus A320 and A321 aircraft. Both airplanes feature Business Class and Economy Class seating. The flight schedule for the new service is as follows (all times local):

Flight Route Departs Arrives Frequency
KA782 HKG-CAN 8:35a 9:25a Daily
KA783 CAN-HKG 10:15a 11:15a Daily
KA786 HKG-CAN 8:40p 9:30p Daily
KA789 CAN-HKG 10:25p 11:25p Daily

Overnight USA flights inbound to Hong Kong will provide convenient connections to Guangzhou via the morning departure. Conversely, the first departure from Guangzhou will connect nicely with the afternoon departures back to North America. Additional connections are available via the evening flights.

Subject to government approval, Cathay Pacific will codeshare on these new services.

The new flights will be Dragonair’s first flights into the Pearl River Delta. Dragonair serves an extensive China network offering additional flights to popular Southeast Asian destinations such as Hanoi, Vietnam, and Phuket, Thailand. Dragonair was voted Best Regional Airline: Southeast Asia in Skytrax’s World Airline Survey.
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