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Old January 26th, 2010, 06:26 PM   #1661
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New family member in CX fleet

Cathay Pacific B-KPO delivery flight to Hong Kong
January 25, 2010.
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Old January 27th, 2010, 05:18 PM   #1662
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Cathay Pacific enhances services to Seoul and Mumbai
27 January 2010
Press Release

Cathay Pacific Airways today announced enhancements to its services to Seoul and Mumbai, offering more convenience and increased connectivity for passengers travelling through the Hong Kong hub.

The airline will add four flights a week to Seoul with effect from 2 May and a further three flights a week from 1 July, taking the frequency back to the 2008 level of five flights a day to and from the city.

With effect from 28 March, the daily non-stop flights between Hong Kong and Mumbai will be retimed to depart Hong Kong at 21.50, offering improved connectivity from key markets such as the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. The evening flight also enables both business and leisure travellers to enjoy a full day in Hong Kong before departure.
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Old January 28th, 2010, 04:42 PM   #1663
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Cathay Pacific Expects Rise In 1st-Quarter Passenger Numbers
27 January 2010

HONG KONG (Dow Jones)--Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. (0293.HK) Chief Executive Tony Tyler said Wednesday he expects the airline's first-quarter passenger numbers to rise from a year earlier, boosted by an improved economy.

Tyler also said the airline is considering launching new routes, including to Moscow.

Cathay Pacific carried 1.6% fewer passengers in 2009, largely because air traffic declined in the first half as a result of the weak global economy.

Passengers numbers rebounded in the second half, and in December, the Hong Kong-based airline and its China-focused unit, Hong Kong Dragon Airlines Ltd., carried 5% more passengers than they did a year earlier.
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Old January 28th, 2010, 09:44 PM   #1664
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After a Bad Year, an Airline Picks Up Speed
January 29, 2010
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/29/bu.../29cathay.html


By BETTINA WASSENER
HONG KONG — On a scale of one to ten, six is not exactly great. But in the airline industry, a self-declared confidence level of six is almost gushingly positive. Especially when it comes from Tony Tyler, the chief executive of Cathay Pacific, one of the largest and most established airlines in Asia and a bellwether for the entire region.

“I have been down in the twos and threes, so that’s a big step forward,” Mr. Tyler said in an interview in his office at Cathay’s headquarters at the Hong Kong airport last week, looking considerably more relaxed than he has been for many, many months.

Since the beginning of the fourth quarter last year, he said, Cathay has seen premium passenger travel and cargo demand start to recover. “And we’re still seeing some fairly good signs in the first quarter of this year.”

Indeed, business has picked up so much that a program under which Cathay Pacific’s more than 18,000 employees were asked to take unpaid leave will most likely not be extended: “It’s a one-off,” Mr. Tyler said, in a clear sign to the airline’s still-worried staff that they would not have to forgo as much as four weeks of pay for a second year running.

Several of the other cost-cutting measures Cathay announced at the height of the global financial crisis last year have already been rolled back: a previously idled freight aircraft has recently returned to service, and a passenger plane that was to have been parked is still in action.

Many scaled-back routes and frequencies have been reinstated. Jidda, Saudi Arabia, was added to Cathay’s network last October, and direct flights to Milan start in March. “One or two other destinations,” including Moscow, are on Cathay’s radar.

The comments from Mr. Tyler, a towering but approachable 54-year-old who occasionally plays guitar in a band called Night Flight, add to a steady trickle of evidence that the airline industry, mauled by the global economic turmoil last year, is now finally on a steadier path.

Korean Air, the largest cargo carrier among the world’s commercial airlines, announced last week that it had returned to profit during the final quarter of 2009. Singapore Airlines, which like Cathay is highly oriented toward premium travel, last month said it was reinstating some flights and would add Munich to its network starting in March. The major U.S. carriers, including Delta Air Lines, Continental Airlines and Southwest Airlines, also have said they were seeing business pick up, albeit slowly.

Japan Air Lines, which filed for bankruptcy protection last week, is the most notable exception to the trend in Asia.

Much depends on how the global economy develops, cautioned Mr. Tyler, who 10 months ago announced the airline’s biggest annual loss, for 2008, and pushed back some major spending plans amid the turmoil.

Founded in 1946 and operating out of the financial hub of Hong Kong, Cathay Pacific caters to the world’s jet-setting banking community and Asia’s increasingly affluent travelers, with upscale service standards to match. So the collapse in business- and first-class travel — one premium passenger gives Cathay about as much revenue as five economy passengers — hit Cathay Pacific especially hard, as did a drop in freight traffic.

Now, it seems, those same areas are set to rebound especially strongly this year. Asian carriers like Cathay, Singapore Airlines and Korean Airlines are well positioned to benefit as growth in Asia, and China in particular, accelerates more sharply than any other region in the world, say analysts like Mark Webb at HSBC in Hong Kong.

As a result, Asia-Pacific carriers are expected to see their losses narrow considerably this year to $700 million, from $3.4 billion last year, the International Air Transport Association estimates.

“We talk to our customers, the big banks, the other big corporate accounts: they all seem to think that they are going to see much more traveling this year than last, so that helps build our confidence,” said Mr. Tyler, the Cathay chief.

So is the airline industry out of the woods? Industry watchers like Peter Harbison, chairman of the Center for Asia Pacific Aviation, a consulting firm in Sydney, do not think so. And Giovanni Bisignani, director general of I.A.T.A., said this week that “the worst is behind us, but it is not time to celebrate.”

For one thing, the world’s airlines are expected to lose a total of $5.6 billion this year, $4.5 billion of that in Europe and North America, according to I.A.T.A. forecasts. (That would still be an improvement the $11 billion loss in 2009.)

Uncertainty about fuel prices remains a perennial worry for the industry. Strikes by disgruntled staff loom at carriers like British Airways.

And while the global economy is now in recovery mode, some observers worry that another dip could still materialize. Mr. Tyler, too, cautioned that it remained unclear whether the current recovery was just a blip.

“We’ll get a better view after Chinese New Year, which is always a bit of a watershed,” he said, referring to a holiday that this year falls in mid-February.

Finally, low-cost, no-frills carriers — long an established player on the American and European air travel stage — are now gaining traction in Asia too.

Just under one in six passengers, or 15.7 percent of people flying, in the Asia-Pacific region were carried by low-cost carriers last year, up from 1.1 percent in 2001, according to the Center for Asia Pacific Aviation.

Despite the growing popularity of budget carriers, Mr. Tyler plans to keep Cathay Pacific firmly in the premium market. A recent review of Cathay’s business model has so far yielded only minor changes — tweaks to seating configurations to shrink some premium cabins, and changes to the network — rather than a full-scale strategy shift, he said.

This will dismay some analysts, who argue that Cathay should have long ago reacted more aggressively to the growing challenge of budget airlines, possibly by setting up its own no-frills offshoot. That strategy has been pursued by Singapore Airlines (with Tiger Airways, which staged a successful market listing last week) and Qantas of Australia (with Jetstar).

Some analysts say that budget carriers like AirAsia and Jetstar present little danger to Cathay Pacific. Mr. Webb, the HSBC analyst, said Cathay could take on low-cost carriers through competitive fares.

“Full-service carriers like Cathay in Asia tend to be much more efficient than those elsewhere, meaning the differences between their fares and those offered by low-cost competitors are not as big as in other regions of the world,” he said. “In addition, the greater distances flown in Asia-Pacific mean the likes of Cathay deploy larger, wide-body planes, which are cheaper to operate, per passenger, than the narrow-body aircraft that the low-cost carriers tend to fly.”

So for now, at least, Cathay is sticking firmly with its strategy: “We don’t intend to pull out of the first-class market,” Mr. Tyler said. “We’re not a no-frills carrier, were a frills carrier.”

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Old January 29th, 2010, 03:57 AM   #1665
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A big question continues to linger with the derivatives hedging. This is somewhat correlated with the pick-up in passengers yet fuel prices will likely outpace the recovery. Given Cathay was quite badly burned with fuel hedging, I wonder how they can cope with keeping the fuel hedging gains/losses in check?
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Old January 29th, 2010, 10:11 PM   #1666
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Does anyone know whether CX is going to resume the extra FRA flight (was operated with A343)? Loads are quite high since there's only 2 daily B744 flights left (1x LH, 1x CX). CDG also saw the cancellation of this extra flight, but it was resumed and shall be extended to daily (or even is). But for FRA, there hasn't been any announcement yet.
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Old February 1st, 2010, 04:17 PM   #1667
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Exclusive: Cathay considers scheduled flights to Haneda
01/11/2010


http://www.airwaysaviationnews.com/1...to-haneda.html


Exclusive: Cathay considers scheduled flights to Haneda
01/11/2010

Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific is considering plans to launch scheduled flights to Tokyo Haneda Airport along with its existing flight services to Tokyo Narita International Airport, Airways Aviation News has learned.

According to Airways Aviation News' source who is close to the Hong Kong flag carrier, that the evaluation plan has been in place "for some time".

However, the plan now seems "to be dependent on the availability of slots at Tokyo Haneda Airport", the source confirms.

Cathay Pacific spokeswoman Carolyn Leung neither confirms nor denies the plan, saying "as always, we will make proper announcements on any new services or frequency changes to our network at appropriate time".

Image Courtesy of Cathay Pacific
All Nippon Airways (ANA) and Japan Airlines (JAL) currently serve the route, while Cathay Pacific has operated charter flights to Tokyo Haneda Airport last Christmas, which proved to be very popular.

Flights to Hong Kong currently have 8 slots at Tokyo Haneda Airport.

With the 4th runway at Haneda opening in October 2010, daytime slots will be increased by 104,000 while a further 40,000 slots will be provided to night and morning operations.

The Haneda Airport will have a total of 447,000 slots, of which 70,000 of them will be allocated for international flights, according to the Japanese government's plan, although not all the new slots will be released at once.

Launching flights to Tokyo Haneda Airport from Hong Kong provides much more convenient services for both leisure and business travellers, since the flights to Tokyo Haneda will depart Hong Kong around mid-night, plus the 4-hour duration of the flight and a time difference of 1 hour, the passengers will land at Tokyo Haneda at around 5 a.m. Tokyo local time.

This maximizes the time usage for both leisure and business travellers, and such flights on All Nippon Airways (ANA) and Japan Airlines (JAL) are proving to be "extremely popular", according to Airways Aviation News' another source, who works in the Japanese tourism industry.

Moreover, offering these extremely popular flights not only provide a much-needed opportunity for Cathay Pacific to increase its profitability, it may be helpful for its oneworld partner Japan Airlines (JAL) as Cathay Pacific has a wider global coverage which can feed its passengers onto JAL's one in Haneda.

Tokyo Narita International Airport and Tokyo Haneda Airport are located 75 km and 15 km away from downtown Tokyo, respectively, and international flights have been handled at the former airport for decades, creating operational challenges for JAL and ANA and headache for the connecting passengers who have to travel from Narita to Haneda by train or bus in order to catch Japanese domestic flights.

Having said that, Cathay Pacific will maintain its operations at Tokyo Narita since "Narita will still be an air transport hub", Airways Aviation News' source says.

Airways Aviation News believes a decision "is likely to be made within this year", dependent on the availability of slots at Haneda.

Airways Aviation News had reported that Cathay may launch flights to Milan, Chicago and Hong Kong-Moscow-Manchester route ("Exclusive: Cathay may announce new flights to Moscow, Milan", 9th Nov 09), of which plans to launch flights to Milan were confirmed shortly afterwards ("Cathay confirms plan to launch Milan flight", 4th Dec 09).

Image Owned by Airways Aviation News
Separately, Cathay Pacific has confirmed that it has delayed the parking of a 747-400 as air travel demand rebounds.

"We have decided to postpone the parking of a 747-400. We will decide whether to take it out of service or keep it flying in the next couple [of] months. So, just 5 passenger aircraft are now parked. We (CX and KA) plan to take delivery of 7 passenger aircraft this year (subject to change)," Cathay Pacific spokeswoman Carolyn Leung clarifies.

Following the change, Cathay Pacific has now parked 4 A340-300s, 1 B747-400 and 5 B747-400 BCFs (excluding 1 wet-leased to AHK).

"[There's] no plan to add freighter capacity or reactivate parked freighters (747-400BCFs) at the moment," Leung said.

Cathay is due to receive 5 B777-300ERs and 2 A330-300s this year.

Airways Aviation News still believes Cathay will eventually decide to park the 747-400 or even more 747-400s in order for passenger capacity to stay largely the same as last year's. In doing so, Cathay can better manage its yields.
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Old February 1st, 2010, 04:37 PM   #1668
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I thought they did fly to Haneda before?
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Old February 1st, 2010, 04:50 PM   #1669
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It's interesting to see 3 flights leaving HKG and head to Haneda around the same time,
but does it mean CX going to operate a morning inbound flight back to HK?
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 12:30 PM   #1670
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Cathay Pacific plans small capacity increase
1 February 2010

SINGAPORE, Feb 1 (Reuters) - Hong Kong carrier Cathay Pacific Airways is considering a small capacity increase this year, which it may add to if faced with stronger demand, its CEO said on Monday.

Tony Tyler said he was cautious about the outlook for the aviation sector and pointed to the growing importance of China for Cathay.

"We are planning a small increase in capacity this year and reinstating some of the frequencies that we dropped last year," Tyler said in an interview in Singapore, ahead of an airshow being held in the city.

"We are looking at low single-digit increase in capacity overall, both on the freight and passenger side. If demand picks up, we will have the ability to add flights."

The aviation industry suffered its worst ever year in 2009 as the global financial crisis hammered demand and would face a still tough environment in 2010, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) said last week.

Asked about a recovery in the airline sector overall, he said: "I'm cautiously optimistic. We saw a recovering trend in the last quarter of 2009 and some of the strength in both the premium passenger market and the cargo market have carried through into the first quarter of this year.

"That gives us rather more comfort than we had last year."

Cargo volume is a leading indicator of global trade, with China a crucial source of air freight for Cathay, Tyler said.

"Most of our cargo revenue is mainland China," he said.

"As far as the passenger side, greater China is clearly number one and the mainland China component of that is the fastest growing."

The airline reported a net profit of HK$812 million ($104.8 million) for January-June 2009, compared with a loss of HK$760 million a year earlier.

It booked fuel hedging gains of HK$2.1 billion, while turnover fell 27 percent to HK$30.9 billion. ($1 = HK$7.8)
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Old February 3rd, 2010, 03:32 AM   #1671
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An Asian airline shakes off a bad year
Cathay Pacific, regarded as regional bellwether, rolls back its cost-cutting

29 January 2010
International Herald Tribune

On a scale of one to ten, six is not exactly great. But in the airline industry, a self-declared confidence level of six is almost gushingly positive. Especially when it comes from Tony Tyler, the chief executive of Cathay Pacific, one of the largest and most established airlines in Asia and a bellwether for the entire region.

‘‘I have been down in the twos and threes, so that’s a big step forward,’’ Mr. Tyler said during an interview in his office at Cathay’s headquarters at the Hong Kong airport last week, looking considerably more relaxed than he had been for many, many months.

Since the beginning of the fourth quarter last year, he said, Cathay has seen premium passenger travel and cargo demand begin to recover. ‘‘And we’re still seeing some fairly good signs in the first quarter of this year.’’

Indeed, business has picked up so much that a program under which Cathay Pacific’s more than 18,000 employees were asked to take unpaid leave will most likely not be extended: ‘‘It’s a one-off,’’ Mr. Tyler said, a sign to the airline’s still-worried staff that they would not have to forgo as much as four weeks of pay for a second year running.

Several of the other cost-cutting measures Cathay announced at the height of the financial crisis last year have already been rolled back: a previously idled freight aircraft has recently returned to service, and a passenger plane that was to have been parked is still in action.

Many scaled-back routes and frequencies have been reinstated. Jidda was added to Cathay’s network last October, and direct flights to Milan start in March. ‘‘One or two other destinations,’’ including Moscow, are on Cathay’s radar.

The comments from Mr. Tyler, a towering but approachable 54-year-old who occasionally plays guitar in a band called Night Flight, add to a steady trickle of evidence that the airline industry, mauled by the global economic turmoil last year, is now finally on a steadier path.

Korean Air, the largest cargo carrier among commercial airlines, announced last week that it had returned to profit during the final quarter of 2009. Singapore Airlines, which like Cathay is highly oriented toward premium travel, last month said it was reinstating some flights and would add Munich to its network starting in March. The major U.S. carriers, including Delta Air Lines, Continental Airlines and Southwest Airlines, also have said they were seeing business pick up, albeit slowly.

Japan Airlines, which filed for bankruptcy protection last week, is the most notable exception to the trend in Asia.

Much depends on how the global economy develops, cautioned Mr. Tyler, who 10 months ago announced the airline’s biggest annual loss, for 2008, and pushed back some major spending plans amid the turmoil.

Founded in 1946 and operating out of the financial hub of Hong Kong, Cathay Pacific caters to the jet-setting banking community and increasingly affluent Asian travelers, with upscale service standards to match. So the collapse in business- and first-class travel — one premium passenger gives Cathay about as much revenue as five economy passengers — hit Cathay Pacific especially hard, as did a drop in freight traffic.

Now, it seems, those same areas are set to rebound especially strongly this year. Asian carriers like Cathay, Singapore Airlines and Korean Air are well positioned to benefit as growth in Asia, and China in particular, accelerates more sharply than any other region in the world, say analysts like Mark Webb at HSBC in Hong Kong.

As a result, Asia-Pacific carriers are expected to see their losses narrow considerably this year to $700 million, from $3.4 billion last year, the International Air Transport Association estimates.

‘‘We talk to our customers, the big banks, the other big corporate accounts: they all seem to think that they are going to see much more traveling this year than last, so that helps build our confidence,’’ said Mr. Tyler, the Cathay chief.

So is the airline industry out of the woods? Industry watchers like Peter Harbison, chairman of the Center for Asia Pacific Aviation, a consulting firm in Sydney, do not think so. And Giovanni Bisignani, director general of I.A.T.A., said this week that ‘‘the worst is behind us, but it is not time to celebrate.’’

For one thing, the world’s airlines are expected to have a combined loss of $5.6 billion this year, $4.5 billion of that in Europe and North America, according to I.A.T.A. forecasts. That would still be an improvement the $11 billion loss in 2009.

Uncertainty about fuel prices is a perennial worry for the industry. Strikes by disgruntled staff loom at carriers like British Airways.

And while the global economy is now in recovery mode, some observers worry that another dip could still materialize. Mr. Tyler, too, said that it remained unclear whether the current recovery was just a blip.

‘‘We’ll get a better view after Chinese New Year, which is always a bit of a watershed,’’ he said, referring to a holiday that this year falls in mid-February.

Finally, low-cost, no-frills carriers — long an established player on the American and European air travel stage — are now gaining traction in Asia.

Just under one in six passengers, or 15.7 percent of people flying, in the Asia-Pacific region were carried by low-cost carriers last year, up from 1.1 percent in 2001, according to the Center for Asia Pacific Aviation.

Despite the growing popularity of budget carriers, Mr. Tyler plans to keep Cathay Pacific firmly in the premium market. A recent review of Cathay’s business model has so far yielded only minor changes — tweaks to seating configurations to shrink some premium cabins, and changes to the network — rather than a full-scale strategy shift, he said.

Some analysts say that budget carriers like AirAsia and Jetstar Airways present little danger to Cathay Pacific. Mr. Webb, the HSBC analyst, said Cathay could take on low-cost carriers through competitive fares.

‘‘Full-service carriers like Cathay in Asia tend to be much more efficient than those elsewhere, meaning the differences between their fares and those offered by low-cost competitors are not as big as in other regions of the world,’’ he said. ‘‘In addition, the greater distances flown in Asia-Pacific mean the likes of Cathay deploy larger, wide-body planes, which are cheaper to operate, per passenger, than the narrow-body aircraft that the low-cost carriers tend to fly.’’

So for now, at least, Cathay is sticking with its strategy. ‘‘We don’t intend to pull out of the first-class market,’’ Mr. Tyler said. ‘‘We’re not a no-frills carrier, were a frills carrier.’’
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Old February 3rd, 2010, 06:16 AM   #1672
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國泰航空鏞記飛機餐翻叮更好味



飛機餐製作難度相當高,除咗要防止食物變壞外,又要食物翻熱後好味,但呢啲都難唔到鏞記酒家老闆甘健成。鏞記尋日再度與國泰航空合作推出中華美食飛機餐,甘老闆深明飛機餐要翻熱嘅缺點,於是想出一系列愈翻熱愈好味嘅靚鵝菜式,加上鏞記四款秘製醬汁,愈翻熱就愈入味,喺幾萬呎高空上都可以享受鏞記享譽國際嘅上等佳餚。


多款燒鵝菜式
甘老闆話,燒鵝翻熱後好難保持香口脆皮,所以佢特別想出五款飛機餐新菜式,包括陳皮鵝湯、紅棉(魚肚)陳皮湯、砂鍋梅子鵝、鵝肝腸滑雞煲仔飯及鹹菜鵝絲紮,再配合四種獨有秘製醬汁包括金豉汁、牛柳汁、宮保汁及沙茶汁,全部都愈煲愈惹味。此外,甘老闆仲將市面甚少售賣嘅「蝦子紮蹄」重新推出,將呢種具有幾十年歷史嘅傳統食品喺飛機上發揚光大。
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Old February 5th, 2010, 04:56 PM   #1673
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By Star Alliance from HKADB :

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Old February 8th, 2010, 10:41 AM   #1674
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The next stop is.........Moscow.

國泰:控制成本措施今年將繼續,季節性因素利好首季業務表現

1 月 27日 星期三 16:10 更新
經濟通通訊社27日專訊

國泰航空(00293)行政總裁湯彥麟出席一項公開活動後表示,預期今年的經營環境仍然困難,因此去年已推行的控制成本措施如無薪假期,今年仍會繼續,因為控制成本對公司經營仍十分重要。


他續指出,受季節性因素帶動,今年首季的業務表現將向好。由於去年的基數較低,整體而言今年的業務表現將較去年理想,但仍未能確定經濟進入強勁復甦。又表示,公司今年將會繼續拓展新航線,如莫斯科,以及加強香港作為樞紐。

至於今年的油價走勢,湯氏表示,不能對油價走勢作預測,但公司已經有對沖燃油價格的措施。由於公司屬於對油價敏感的行業,若油價大幅上升,對沖效果將會逐漸減少,甚至會錄得虧損。
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Old February 10th, 2010, 05:47 AM   #1675
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Local pilots fly off the handle at expat perks
The Standard
Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Cathay Pacific's local pilots are to boycott the Lunar New Year parade and other promotional activities by the airline in protest at what they claim is "unequal treatment."

Housing allowances for pilots are exclusive to expatriates regardless of whether they are Hong Kong permanent residents or not.

According to The Standard's sister newspaper Singtao Daily, housing allowances account for around 40 percent of the total income of expatriate pilots.

This means that while an expatriate can earn up to HK$110,000 a month, their local colleagues only get around HK$60,000.

Education subsidies are another area of complaint. This benefit is offered to all expatriates, but only to senior local pilots.

According to a source, who asked not to be named, the request by 300 local pilots for equal treatment has fallen on deaf ears.

"Cathay Pacific Airways keeps claiming Hong Kong is its home, but the claim is not in line with its employment policy," the source said.

The decision to boycott Sunday's Lunar New Year parade is backed by the Hong Kong Aircrew Officers Association, which represents locals and expatriates.

Cathay Pacific Airways has around 2,400 pilots, of whom 12 percent are local Chinese. The union represents around 70 percent of all pilots hired by the airline.

The group has also sought help from three legislators to determine whether the airline is in breach of racial discrimination laws or regulations.

It is also threatening to take the case to the Equal Opportunities Commission.

Cathay expressed disappointment at the boycott. The airline also rebutted allegations of racial discrimination, saying the company treats its employees equally regardless of nationality or race.

It said the offer of some fringe benefits was intended to attract pilots from overseas to fill vacancies which could not be filled by the local labor market.

"It would be unfair for local pilots to ask for the same housing allowances as those hired from overseas," an airline spokesperson said.
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Old February 11th, 2010, 05:47 AM   #1676
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Cathay Pacific plans to fly to Moscow
10 February 2010


Cathay Pacific Airways today announced plans to fly to Moscow, capital of the Russian Federation. The airline is in the process of applying to the relevant authorities and looks forward to finalising flight details as soon as the regulatory approvals are in place.

Cathay Pacific Chief Executive Tony Tyler said: “Moscow has been on our radar screen for some time now. This planned addition to our network underlines Cathay Pacific’s commitment to develop new markets, and our ongoing work to strengthen Hong Kong as one of the world’s leading international aviation hubs.

“We expect Moscow will develop quickly as a prime destination for business and leisure travellers from this part of the world.

“Our strong network will enable us to offer great connections for travellers from Moscow through the Hong Kong hub to our Southeast Asian destinations and to Mainland China with our sister airline Dragonair.

“Travel demand between the two cities is showing substantial growth thanks in no small part to the visa-free access enjoyed by passport holders of the HKSAR and the Russian Federation.”

Subject to regulatory approval, Cathay Pacific plans to operate a thrice-weekly service to Moscow with Airbus A340-300 aircraft in a two-class configuration featuring Cathay Pacific’s acclaimed long-haul Business Class product. The intended new service is planned to begin this summer.

Cathay Pacific currently has a code share arrangement with the Russian national carrier Aeroflot on the Hong Kong-Moscow
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Old February 11th, 2010, 07:39 PM   #1677
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By da83 from HKADB :



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Old February 14th, 2010, 05:46 PM   #1678
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Cathay Pacific January Passengers Up 0.4% On Year At 2.1 Mln
12 February 2010

HONG KONG (Dow Jones)--Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. (0293.HK) said Friday it carried 0.4% more passengers in January than a year earlier, while its cargo throughput rose 31%.

The Hong Kong-based airline and its China-focused unit, Hong Kong Dragon Airlines Ltd., carried 2.10 million passengers last month and cargo throughput totaled 132,586 metric tons.

Year-earlier figures weren't available.

The airline's passenger load factor, or the proportion of seats filled on each flight, rose 4.3 percentage points from a year earlier to 83.8%.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 07:18 AM   #1679
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Cathay flushed with success of `mission not so impossible'
19 February 2010
SCMP

Lai See has the highest respect for people and organisations with a pronounced sense of mission and purpose.

Remember late last year, when a number of Cathay Pacific flights were being plagued by mysterious toilet blockages on its Airbus fleet? In one extreme incident, a crowded passenger plane was forced to make an unscheduled landing in India because it had no working lavatories on board.

For those unfamiliar with aircraft toilets, here is the Hi-Tech Toilet Manual 101. They use a high-speed pipe mechanism that carries waste at up to 110 km/h into a holding tank. Reassuringly efficient, if they work!

Cathay decided to tackle the problem head on. It has made it its mission to make sure all aircraft departing Hong Kong are free of defects that affect passenger comfort. With a touch of military discipline, it has even code-named this aggressive effort Z-ADDs - zero acceptable deferred defects. Deadline: April 1.

Its "Mission Not So Impossible" is to ensure that no aircraft leaves the home hub with a faulty seat, toilet malfunction, inoperable inflight entertainment system or any other problem.

We just love it when people are so committed to their jobs. Steve Chadwick, general manager engineering technical, is definitely our hero.

In a memo to staff, he wrote: "We now have complete accountability within the team to ensure that our aircraft depart with cabins in good working order ... But this is a project that belongs to everyone in the airline and we call on cabin crew and other staff to help us by making sure every problem - no matter how small - is put in the log."

Lai See salutes you, Steve. "Yes, Sir!"
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Old February 24th, 2010, 05:28 PM   #1680
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HK Approves 8% Hike In Cathay Pacific Fuel Surcharges For March
22 February 2010

HONG KONG (Dow Jones)--The Hong Kong government said Monday it approved Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd.'s (0293.HK) application to raise fuel surcharges by 8% for the month of March, on higher global oil prices.

The revised charges will allow Hong Kong's dominant carrier to continue collecting fuel surcharges from passengers until the end of March, the Civil Aviation Department said.

The department said that apart from Cathay Pacific, it also approved requests to extend and raise charges from Singapore Airlines Ltd. (C6L.SG).

The government earlier said it will review passenger fuel surcharge applications from airlines on a monthly basis instead of a bimonthly basis, to enable airlines to quickly adjust their surcharges in tandem with changes in jet fuel prices.

Cathay Pacific's fuel surcharge for short-haul flights within Asia will rise to at HK$84 per journey from HK$78, and the surcharge for long-haul flights will rise to HK$390 from HK$362.
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