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Old September 26th, 2007, 07:01 AM   #21
hkskyline
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Actually, I'd like to see how green roofs are implemented around the world. Bearing in mind planting large trees on roofs may not be suitable due to the lack of deep soils, grass and small potted plants is likely the way to go.
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Old September 26th, 2007, 04:35 PM   #22
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Haha this thread reminds me of Yes, Minister!
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Old September 26th, 2007, 04:59 PM   #23
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Philadelphia Housing Authority building 'green' project
20 August 2007

PHILADELPHIA (AP) - The city's housing authority plans to build its first totally "green" building, a $23.4 million project that officials said will be more efficient in its use of energy, water and other materials.

Nellie Reynolds Gardens, a 64-unit senior development under construction in North Philadelphia, will feature a "green" roof with natural vegetation.

The agency plans to install energy efficient appliances and fixtures, while also using environmentally friendly paints, primers and caulking to help preserve the building's air quality, according to the housing authority.

Executive Director Carl Greene said rising utility costs, combined with a desire to help the environment, prompted the agency to build the project.

"We know that every dollar we save on energy costs is a dollar we can invest in housing and neighborhoods," Greene said in a statement.
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Old September 27th, 2007, 06:35 PM   #24
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hkskyline, did u actually read my post before? Would like to receive some kinda attention
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Old September 27th, 2007, 06:55 PM   #25
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^ post 21.
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Old September 29th, 2007, 03:48 AM   #26
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Pittsburgh Convention Center has been certified with a Gold LEED rating by the U.S. Green Building Council.



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Old October 3rd, 2007, 07:38 AM   #27
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i've also heard green roof aren't all that environmental friendly when implemented in areas where rain water are scarce, an example is the GAP corporate hq in san bruno, it cost environment more for them to water the green roof than the positive effect it brings.

here is a picture:

so when designing green roof, the architect really needs to take the regions's climatic condition into account.

also when applying light-weight plants that are not
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Old October 17th, 2007, 09:02 AM   #28
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Definitely. Even for tropical areas, having a rainforest at the roof isn't feasible either. Can't imagine what will happen putting all that weight on the structure.
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Old October 17th, 2007, 06:14 PM   #29
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The new Vancouver Convention Centre will feature the largest green roof in Canada
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Old October 22nd, 2007, 04:49 PM   #30
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this green roof is part of a terrace of an apartments building in the centre of Athens.....it is one years old and it has even trees on...(look the olive tree in the pics)
It is 130 square metres....im seriously thinking to make the same in my terrace,the owner of this terrace has 3-5 degrees coller conditions at summer!!!!



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Old October 22nd, 2007, 05:02 PM   #31
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Old October 22nd, 2007, 07:37 PM   #32
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I think the thread title said green roofs, not 'rainforests larger than the amazon' roofs.
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Old November 15th, 2007, 03:33 PM   #33
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Environmentally friendly Clinton library builds 'green' roof
14 November 2007

LITTLE ROCK (AP) - Bill Clinton likes to brag about his presidential library and museum being a "green" building. Soon, he'll have a green roof to go with it.

Over the past two weeks, workers have been using a crane to hoist 90 species of plants and more than four truckloads of soil atop the former president's library and museum to transform what had been a plain looking roof into a garden surrounding Clinton's penthouse apartment.

Instead of an expanse of concrete, the glass and steel structure will be topped by the end of this month with, among other things, strawberries, ferns, switch grass and roses.

"This is just an area he can come in relax in and just enjoy the view," Clinton Foundation Facilities and Operations Director Debbie Shock said in an interview on the roof on a recent afternoon.

The changes may look pretty, but they're not only for aesthetics. The roof is capturing rainwater that would normally run off onto the soil and a hidden irrigation system cuts down on the amount of water that would be used on sprinklers.

It represents what Clinton -- who has used his nonprofit foundation to promote sustainable development and environmentally friendly building practices -- would like to see in buildings nationwide.

Clinton recently announced a program through his foundation aimed at helping homeowners and commercial building owners modernize their buildings to reduce energy use. The scene surrounding his private residence at the library provides a glimpse of what that may entail.

"When President Clinton built his library here, part of what he wanted was something that would serve as an example to others, both in design and architecture, but also in sustainability and its footprint and its coexistence with the city landscape," Clinton Foundation spokesman Jordan Johnson said. "The purpose was to walk the walk and talk the talk."

The $165 million library complex already had plenty to tout in terms of ecological features. The library, the first presidential library to earn an award from the U.S. Green Committee for environmental design, includes floors made from recycled rubber tires. Solar panels sit on another portion of the roof, and the parking lot features bicycle racks and charging stations for electric cars.

When it opened in 2004, the library earned a "silver" rating under the Leadership Energy Environmental Design, the benchmark for environmentally friendly buildings. Last week, it earned a "platinum" certification for ongoing works on its existing buildings.

On a recent afternoon, Shock and other foundation workers pointed out the benefit of replacing a traditional flat roof with a garden with a depth ranging from 3 inches to 9 inches.

"All of a sudden, instead of having a roof that water continually runs off of, now you've got a rain mat underneath here that will actually irrigate these plants. It actually becomes a control for your stormwater runoff," Shock said. "It's not only for enjoyment, but it's got a lot to do with the environment and how we control our stormwater runoff."

And if additional water is needed for the plants, the library will rely on an underground irrigation system that will use 90 percent less water than traditional sprinklers or hoses would use.

"There will never be any sprinklers up here," said Bruce Hayes, president of Sustainable Engineering Solutions, an Oregon-based firm that is installing the irrigation system. "It just comes up from the ground."

Shock said the garden won't become a virtual jungle, but will be maintained in an eco-friendly manner. That means no gas-powered lawnmowers or machines, and no chemicals.

"We're not using any pesticides. All of our fertilizers are organic," Shock said.

The gardening team also added a sentimental touch by planting the favorite flower of his mom, the late Virginia Kelley.

"His mom loved yellow roses, and he always gave her yellow roses for any holidays so we're giving back to him some yellow roses," Shock said.

Though most of the changes will be invisible to library visitors -- the garden and Clinton's private apartment are closed to the public -- Shock said she hopes to add exhibits detailing the roof's features and how they help the environment.

The rooftop garden will feature some herbs and vegetables, and Shock hopes to share the bounty with library visitors -- if not its sole resident.

"When the president's here, we'd love to have him throw in some green onions or some scallion in his scrambled eggs," Shock said. "But we're also hoping we can pick some and take it down to the cafe and let them use it and let our visitors experience a little bit from our green roof."

------

On the Net:

Clinton Foundation: http://www.clintonfoundation.org

Clinton Library: http://www.clintonlibrary.gov
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Old March 13th, 2008, 06:51 AM   #34
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In Chicago, a secret garden cools a concrete jungle

CHICAGO, March 13, 2008 (AFP) - Nestled atop Chicago's neoclassical city hall lies a secret garden hidden to all but those peering out of the windows of neighboring office towers.

Dozens more dot the rooftops of shops, restaurants, businesses and city-owned buildings in a patchwork of green aimed at cooling the concrete jungle.

Some four million square feet (370,000 square meters) of rooftop gardens have been planted on public and private buildings in the seven years since the first plants were placed atop city hall as part of a broader effort to reduce the Windy City's carbon footprint.

Inspired by similar programs in Europe, Chicago now has one of the most extensive rooftop garden programs in the world.

Corporate America is joining the trend and planting gardens atop a Chicago McDonald's restaurant as well as an Apple store, while other smaller businesses and landowners are converting to green roofs with the help of city grants.

"Chicago is at the head of the pack," said Amy Malik, regional director of the nonprofit group International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives.

Concrete surfaces -- especially those coated with dark tar -- both absorb and radiate heat which significantly increases a building's heating and cooling costs and contributes to raising urban air temperatures.

The cooling impact of the gardens is dramatic.

Thermal images taken of the city hall rooftop on a cloudy summer day found it was the same temperature as the air: 74 degrees F (22 degrees C). The black tar roof next door was a scalding 152 degrees F.

-- Benefits are 'more than just aesthetic' --

"There are more than just aesthetic benefits," said Chicago's Environment Commissioner Suzanne Malec-McKenna.

In addition to helping cool buildings, the plants also filter the air, reducing pollution and improving surrounding air quality.

The rooftops also "stress sewers less by gathering rain water and using it," and a green roof can also extend the life of a roof by protecting from the elements beating down on it, Malec-McKenna said in an interview.

Authorities do not generally open the 36 city-owned rooftop gardens to the public because of safety concerns.

But more than three dozen species of birds gather amid the 20,000 plants on the city hall garden alone.

It is a 20,000-square-foot oasis perched on top of an 11-story building in the heart of the central business district which hosts more than 150 species of plants, including purple comb flower, juniper and crabapple trees, bittersweet vine and sedum, a succulent, cactus-like plant ideal for green roofs because of its high tolerance for extreme temperatures and minimal need for water.

And honey from the beehives kept in two of the city gardens is sold to raise money for after-school programs.

"A market has been built around this," Malec-McKenna said. "The economics of building green roofs have gotten much better. Now we have more than two dozen contractors across the Chicago region who know how to do this."

Organic grocery store owner Paula Companio received a 5,000-dollar grant from the city in 2006 to grow produce on her roof which she hopes to eventually sell in her store below.

The 1,500-square-foot garden covers half of the roof on top of True Nature Foods and produces a small crop of onions, potatoes, herbs and tomatoes.

Companio estimates that her building has been 15 to 20 percent warmer in the winter, and "noticeably" cooler in the summer since the garden was planted.

"The experience became such a community project - everyone asked about it," she told AFP. "It showed people it's possible that they can do it too."
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Old March 15th, 2008, 01:24 PM   #35
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Green roofs are really nice .
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Old June 11th, 2008, 01:07 PM   #36
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Mexico City plants lawns on roofs to fight warming

MEXICO CITY, June 5 (Reuters) - Mexico City, one of the world's most polluted capitals, is planting rooftop gardens on public buildings as part of a program launched on Thursday to combat global warming.

The smog-choked metropolis plans to replace gas tanks, clothes lines and asphalt on 100,000 square feet (9,300 square metres) of publicly owned roof space each year with grass and bushes that will absorb carbon dioxide.

The city also plans to offer tax breaks for businesses or individuals who put gardens on top of their offices and apartment buildings.

The vast majority of buildings and homes in Mexico City have flat roofs, making the city an ideal candidate for the roof garden plan.

Left-wing Mayor Marcelo Ebrard has pledged $5.5 billion over five years to reduce greenhouse gases in Mexico City, home to some 20 million people and 4 million cars.

"These are not generic objectives or wishes -- we have a clear goal," Ebrard said at an event to inaugurate the environmental plan.

The aim is to cut carbon emissions by 4.4 million tonnes a year, still a fraction of the 643 million tonnes of gas Mexico produces nationwide each year, ranking it among the world's top polluters.

The mayor has encouraged cycling by providing bicycle paths and some car-free roads on weekends.

His program also aims to capture gas that bubbles up from overflowing landfills and calls for a new subway line and more express bus routes.

Putting plants on roofs soaks up some of the carbon dioxide belched out by cars and factories, one of the main causes of climate change, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says.

So far two buildings owned by the public transportation system have layered soil and grass seed over a mesh drainage system on their roofs.

On top of a school for the children of subway workers, gravel paths now wind through patches of grass and a small garden. Bushes grow around air vents and piping.

Maintenance workers say keeping the garden lush is hard under the pounding Mexican sun but worth the effort, even just for the schoolchildren who now climb up there to play.

"Most of the children don't have access to any green places, this is another world for them," said school administrator Juan Rivero as he surveyed his new urban oasis.

The city boasted blue skies and ample greenery as recently as the 1960s. But it has become clogged by traffic and dirtied by fumes as the population exploded.
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Old June 11th, 2008, 09:54 PM   #37
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That's nice, I guess, although I'd rather use roofs to produce energy whenever it's possible.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 05:52 PM   #38
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Cincinnati officials want 'green' roofs to replace shingles and tar atop buildings
2 October 2008

CINCINNATI (AP) - Officials want to see more green roofs on building tops in Cincinnati.

The City Council on Wednesday became the first in Ohio with a plan to channel grants and loans to residents and businesses to replace tar and shingles with vegetation.

Supporters of the idea want to see Cincinnati become a leader in green roofs, a European-born movement that has spread to only a few U.S. cities, including Chicago, Milwaukee and Seattle.

They say the greenery not only is pleasing aesthetically but reduces stormwater runoff, filters pollutants and cuts heating and cooling costs.

In Ohio, pastoral roofs grace the tops of the Toledo public library, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency building in Columbus and the Cleveland Environmental Center, home of the Greater Cleveland Green Building Coalition.

"We call it our civic plaza rooftop," Toledo library spokeswoman Rhonda Sewell.

It was installed in 2000.

"We were inspired by what we saw in Chicago during a public library conference," said Charlie Oswanski, who heads the library's facilities and operations. "It's performing very well -- very low maintenance, and it does benefit us in cooling and heating costs."

Chicago has scores of green roofs, including one atop City Hall. Other buildings elsewhere in the United States that are considered green roof pioneers include the Ford Motor Co. Rouge assembly plant in Dearborn, Mich., and the Convention Center of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City.

The plan approved Wednesday in Cincinnati is the first of its kind in Ohio, said Bob Monsarrat, manager of the environmental planning section of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, which directs certain federal grant funds toward such programs.

"We have wanted to support green infrastructure initiatives in the state directed toward improving water quality, so this was a fairly easy sell to us," Monsarrat said.

He said the handful of green roofs in Ohio have generally been on government buildings, while the Cincinnati program is mainly aimed at commercial buildings.

"It's very exciting," said Vicki Ciotti, director of the nonprofit Civic Garden Center, which plans to begin a roof garden early next year. She said the council's plan should jump-start a movement that has taken hold in a few cities but has generally been slow to grow.

"It's been slow just because it's such a new idea for us," Ciotti said. "They've been doing green roofs for years in Germany."

A report by the Green Roof Research Program at Michigan State University estimates that 12 percent of all flat-roofed buildings in Germany are covered with vegetation. It noted several barriers to widespread acceptance in the United States, including lack of government incentives or tax breaks.

"What the city of Cincinnati is doing is the largest effort I have heard of," Monsarrat said. "It will be interesting to watch that and see how it works."

About $5 million a year in below-market-rate loans through the U.S. EPA Clean Water State Revolving Fund will be available starting in 2009 for green roof projects, city officials estimate, along with an undetermined amount of grant money from other EPA funds.
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Old November 12th, 2008, 05:53 PM   #39
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Con Ed installs a 'green roof' on 1 of its New York City facilities to save energy
28 August 2008

NEW YORK (AP) - More than 21,000 plants atop a Con Edison facility in New York City are helping reduce the building's energy costs.

It is the utility's first "green roof," an energy-saving plant system designed to improve air quality and conserve energy.

Con Ed said Thursday that the plants keep its three-story training and conference facility in Long Island City, Queens, cooler by absorbing heat and reducing the need for air conditioning. It projects that the green roof will save the building up to 30 percent in energy costs.

The plants include 15 varieties of sedum, which can absorb rainwater and is resistant to pests.

Con Ed collaborated on the project with Columbia University scientists.

While the green roof is the first for Con Edison, one was installed at the Silvercup Studios in Long Island City in 2004.
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Old November 22nd, 2008, 04:57 PM   #40
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In rotterdam, authorities are thinking about a law that every new flat roof should have a garden on top.
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